City offices closed, trash pickup changes for Memorial Day
Published - 05/25/18 - 09:39 AM | 428 views | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend | print
All City of San Diego administrative offices will be closed on Monday, May 28, 2018 in observance of the Memorial Day holiday. • There will be a one-day delay in curbside trash, recyclables and yard waste for customers served by the Environmental Services Department. For example: Monday’s collection will occur on Tuesday, and so on, with Friday’s collection occurring on Saturday. Normal collection will resume on Monday, June 4. • This schedule is for residents serviced by the City of San Diego only. Residents in other cities should check with their waste hauler for holiday service schedules. • The City’s Miramar Landfill will be on its normal schedule from 7 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. (Self-haul customers not allowed after 4 p.m.) • Chollas Lake will be open from 6:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. • San Vicente Reservoir will be open a half-hour before sunrise to sunset. • Golf courses and starter booths will be open normal hours. Holiday rates will apply. • All public buildings in Balboa Park will be closed including: Balboa Park Activity Center, Botanical Building, Casa del Prado, Municipal Gym and War Memorial Building.  • Mission Trails Regional Park Visitor Center will be open. • The Robb Field Skate Park, Rancho Peñasquitos Skate Park, Linda Vista Skate Park, Carmel Valley Skate Park, Bill and Maxine Wilson Skate Park and the Charles L. Lewis III Memorial Skate Park will be open during regular hours.  • Parking meters, time restrictions for parking on streets and yellow zones within the city of San Diego will not be enforced. Red, white and blue zones are still enforced every day. Parking rules on Port property and in different cities may vary so please read signage provided. Specific closures within the city on Monday, May 28: • All administrative offices; • All libraries; • All City recreation centers and pools; • Tecolote Nature Center; • Open Space and Maintenance Assessment District Offices; • The Testing, Employment Information Center and Background/Fingerprinting offices within the Personnel Department; • The Family Justice Center - Individuals needing help with domestic violence should call 9-1-1 and/or the Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-888-385-4657. Public Safety: • Police and Fire emergency crews will not be impacted. • Station 38 (Citywide emergency dispatch center) will be on duty.
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Midway group opposes Soccer City development plan
by DAVE SCHWAB
Published - 05/25/18 - 08:57 AM | 467 views | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend | print
After hearing a consultant’s pitch, Midway Community Planning Group in May unanimously opposed the Soccer City November ballot initiative. Two competing ballot proposals to redevelop Qualcomm Stadium in Mission Valley, Soccer City and SDSU West, will face off in the Nov. 6 election. SDSU West calls for a new 35,000-seat Aztecs football stadium, a river park, campus expansion and research center.  Soccer City by FS Investors includes a 22,000-seat stadium to draw a Major League Soccer expansion team (32,000 for Aztecs football) plus a river park, retail and SDSU expansion. Each proposal needs a simple majority to be approved. If both are approved, the one with the highest vote total passes. If neither measure receives a majority, the issue will go back to square one and the City Council. Consultant Joe LaCava said Soccer City private developers are seizing the opportunity to redevelop the former Chargers stadium site via a citizen’s initiative process, which he characterized as an end around, citing three reasons for opposition. “It was written behind closed doors,” argued LaCava. “There are numerous loopholes in it that developers don’t have to deliver on. They did not negotiate in good faith with SDSU.” LaCava contended the citizen’s initiative process qualifying Soccer City on the ballot also bypasses the City Council and local planning review. “We’re asking your plan group to take a stance,” he said. In the citizens' initiative process, citizens draft a legislative bill or constitutional amendment, which they then propose by petition. If the petition receives sufficient popular support, the measure is then placed on the ballot and can be enacted into law by a direct vote of citizens. MCPG chair Cathy Kenton concurred that citizen’s initiative process to put controversial matters on an election ballot could serve as a bad example for Midway, given the community is in the midst of a community plan update. “This is a really critical time for us with the [possible redevelopment] of the sports arena area and SPAWAR,” she said. Community planner Kurt Sullivan questioned the appropriateness of opposing the citizens’ initiative process “until the plan group knows more about it.” The group nonetheless unanimously voted to oppose Soccer City. In other action:  MCPG unanimously turned thumbs down on a proposal made to consolidate the city’s 43 planning groups into a handful of larger, regionally-based groups. “It’s not appropriate for the whole structure of planning groups to be dismantled, and for them to be consolidated,” said MCPG board member Judy Holiday. The group unanimously voted against the planning group consolidation proposal. City planner Vickie White briefing the group on the Midway Community Plan update noting the final decision to approve the plan update or not will be made by the full City Council on June 26. City officials briefed the plan group on progress being made on review of an impact fee study for the Midway area. A list with 100 or more projects involved in the study was passed out to the MCPG board.
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Spin & Go outdoors at Liberty Station
by LUCIA VITI
Published - 05/25/18 - 08:03 AM | 339 views | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend | print
A Spin & Go instructor leads a class.
A Spin & Go instructor leads a class.
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Spin & Go, a “pop-up” outdoor stationery cycling class, now graces Liberty Station every Wednesday at 5:30 p.m. While embracing the adventure of the outdoors, Spin & Go captures the energy of stationery cycling, a class that now dominates the world of group exercise. The concept is simple. Participants of all athletic levels sign up for a 45-minute flywheel ride at the pop-up location. Spin & Go sets up, cleans up, and provides an incredible ride with a dynamic, certified instructor. Owners Corey Butts and Oz Blackaller both agree, “Spin & Go is the outdoor evolution of an indoor cycling studio.” The transportable class is noted to combine an “exciting atmosphere that encourages camaraderie,” with the beauty of an outdoor environment. “A brick-and-mortar studio is no match for the beauty of the outdoors,” said Butts. Brother-in-laws by marriage to twin sisters, Butts and Blackaller collectively share years of fitness and business experience. Touting a bachelor of science degree in health science and kinesiology, Butts lauds two decades of working within the realm of athletics. The self-described “educator and motivator” continues to serve within the genres of personal and athletic performance training, his outdoor boot-camp classes entitled BMORFIT, as well as cycle and yoga instruction. “As an educator and motivator, I challenge clients to achieve their fitness goals in a safe and effective way,” he said. Sporting a bachelor of science degree in business management, Blackaller, a human resource professional, is also a licensed yoga instructor who leads private and group yoga classes. Blackaller combined his business acumen with his talent for health, wellness and “excellence in customer service,” to instigate a “shared entrepreneurial mindset and interest in fitness,” with Butts to bring Spin & Go to fruition. “Corey and I believe in the strength of the team,” he said. “Corey’s fitness background combined with my business acumen was the perfect complement for opening a business we felt good about. Our business model was based on thinking outside the box. “We’ve set ourselves apart from the competition. We believe in uniqueness. Our brand is an alternative way to get people fit in a great venue like Liberty Station. Fitness as part of one’s daily routine is key to a healthy and balanced lifestyle,” he said. As a seasoned fitness veteran, Butts acknowledged “how convenience and location” effects one’s ability to adhere to an exercise schedule. Determined to capitalize on San Diego’s climate and “beautiful outdoor spaces,” Butts and Blackaller describe Spin & Go as an effective outdoor workout that can further enrich and “improve San Diegan’s health and quality of life.” Studies indicate that outdoor athletic activity increases one’s enthusiasm to exercise. Simply stated, exercising outdoors – in any capacity – encourages participants to exercise more. Direct exposure to sunlight is also noted to directly – and positively – affect mood. “Scientific research backs the benefits of exercising outdoors,” continued Butts. “Working out outside changes your mood and revitalizes your energy. And fresh air is better for breathing.” “I love being an instructor for Spin and Go!” said Natalie Siegler. “Teaching an outdoor cycle class is awesome and fun. And it’s a great workout. Students really enjoy cycling in the fresh air and not worrying about their safety, as they would be riding on roads.” In addition to public venue spins, Spin & Go offers “spin ups,” classes designed for corporations to use for “team-building, employee retention and recruiting.” Classes are set up at the location chosen by the client. “Spin & Go is a unique fitness program that brings outdoor cycling classes to beautiful parks and venues near you,” Butts said. “Simply sign up for a class in your area and cycle your way to health!” “I believe having a fitness regime included in everyday life is important, to ensure both mind and body are fit so that we achieve more balance in our lives,” concluded Blackaller. Participants can sign up through the website. Classes may be purchased individually for $20 or a package of 20 for $349. Corporate client packages are priced according to services.
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I Love A Clean San Diego, students and volunteers create ‘Waves of Change’
Published - 05/25/18 - 08:00 AM | 1991 views | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend | print
After the cleanup, the group formed a stunning aerial art image of the sun setting over ocean waves and the words “Waves of Change.”
After the cleanup, the group formed a stunning aerial art image of the sun setting over ocean waves and the words “Waves of Change.”
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On May 24, I Love A Clean San Diego (ILACSD) empowered 1,049 elementary school students, teachers, and volunteers to be a wave of change at Mission Beach for the 25th Annual Kids’ Ocean Day. During the four-hour event, students and volunteers channeled their appreciation for our ocean into action to protect it. With a litter cleanup along Mission Beach and Bay, students and volunteers significantly improved the health and beauty of San Diego’s natural environment, preventing debris from entering the ocean and harming sensitive marine wildlife. After the cleanup, the group formed a stunning aerial art image of the sun setting over ocean waves and the words “Waves of Change.” All the students who participated in Kids’ Ocean Day attend local Title I schools and otherwise may not have the means to go to the beach. For 140 students, this event was their first beach experience. The event’s youth participants represented Buena Vista Elementary, Ericson Elementary, Field Elementary, Porter Elementary, Joyner Elementary, San Marcos Elementary, Mission Elementary, and Los Peñasquitos Elementary. The event culminated with the creation of a piece of living art – an aerial art image that spelled out “Waves of Change” along South Mission Beach. This powerful, captivating image called for San Diegans to take action for the oceans. With eight million metric tons of plastic waste entering the world’s oceans each year, a cleaner future will only be possible by prioritizing conservation over convenience and decreasing our consumption and disposal of single-use plastic items. By drawing attention to the issue of plastic pollution, the young participants hope this message inspires all San Diegans to make changes that benefit our environment. Kids’ Ocean Day was made possible through the generous support of many partners, including California’s Coastal Commission’s Whale Tale grant program and the Protect Our Coast and Oceans Fund, Qualcomm Foundation, Cox Communications, Jack in the Box, Bumble Bee Seafoods, Alta Environmental, Wells Fargo, CRC CARES, U.S. Bank, ViaSat, Kohl’s, Einstein Bagels, Starbucks, and Outside the Lens. Volunteer support for the event included individual community members and teams representing Kohl’s, Wells Fargo, HandsOn San Diego, Sony, Shake Shack, Pacific Beach Women’s Club, and many more. Kids’ Ocean Day is one of hundreds of cleanups hosted by ILACSD. In 2017, ILACSD mobilized over 31,000 volunteers who removed nearly 400,000 pounds of debris from San Diego County. Join ILACSD for their next cleanup on Saturday, June 9 at Rainbow County Park. For more information about how to get involved, please visit CleanSD.org.
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‘Hair’ to let the sun shine in at Ocean Beach Playhouse
Published - 05/25/18 - 07:45 AM | 338 views | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend | print
“Hair: The American Tribal Love-Rock Musical,” a cult-favorite story of a group of New York hippies struggling to balance their lives against the Vietnam War’s public toll and the upheaval within the sexual revolution of the ’60s, will run at the playhouse from June 1 to July 1.
“Hair: The American Tribal Love-Rock Musical,” a cult-favorite story of a group of New York hippies struggling to balance their lives against the Vietnam War’s public toll and the upheaval within the sexual revolution of the ’60s, will run at the playhouse from June 1 to July 1.
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If one city knows anything about letting the sun shine in, it’s San Diego – and beginning in June, the OB Playhouse and Theatre Company gets a chance to prove it a half-century after the Broadway debut of a namesake production. “Hair: The American Tribal Love-Rock Musical,” a cult-favorite story of a group of New York hippies struggling to balance their lives against the Vietnam War’s public toll and the upheaval within the sexual revolution of the ’60s, will run at the playhouse from June 1 to July 1. The Gerome Ragni and James Rado story centers on group leader Claude, his roommates Berger and Sheila and his considerable angst as he decides whether to resist the draft or to succumb to the pressures of conservative America and serve in Vietnam.   “Hair,” whose signature tunes include “Aquarius” and “Let the Sun Shine In,” premiered in 1967 off-Broadway, moving to Broadway the following year. It’s generally considered the last entry among the so-called Golden Age musicals, which had their inception in 1948 with “Oklahoma!” It caused a considerable media stir amid its vehement antiwar tone and its acclaimed nude scene, which lasted only 20 seconds under dim lighting and nonetheless prompted threats of censorship. Participation in the scene was voluntary, and the interval also became the butt of pop-culture humor. “I was gonna go see it,” the late Groucho Marx quipped, “and then I called up the theater. They said the tickets were $11 apiece. I told them I’d call them back, went into my bathroom, took off all my clothes and looked at myself in the full-length mirror. Then I called the theater and said, ‘Forget it.’” In 1969, “Hair” was nominated for the best director and best musical Tony Awards. In 2008, the show won a Tony for best revival of a musical.  The OB Playhouse and Theatre Company is administered by executive director Bill Connard and his artistic director wife Jennie, who took over the space in 2016. The controversial “Avenue Q” is among its recent mounts; it will stage “The Rocky Horror Show” in October.  The venue is at 4944 Newport Ave. For more, see obtheatrecompany.com or call 619-795-9305.
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