News and community briefs for Ocean Beach and Point Loma
Published - 05/29/17 - 07:05 AM | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Schooners sail near Point Loma in San Diego Bay. / Photo by Thomas Melville
Schooners sail near Point Loma in San Diego Bay. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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Volunteers needed for Ocean Beach Street Fair Don't miss a most fun volunteer opportunity in Ocean Beach – the annual Street Fair and Chili Cook-Off Festival on Saturday, June 24. Volunteer registration is open, and Ocean Beach MainStreet Association is recruiting for lots of great positions. Check out the details and register at www.OceanBeachSanDiego.com. Volunteering is even more fun with friends, so spread the word! Luxury condos coming to Rosecrans St. Bellamar, a collection of 16 two-bedroom master flats, is coming to 1180 Rosecrans St. in Point Loma replacing Blockbuster Video, Ipanema Watch & Jewelry and Gus's Subs. Developer Rudy Medina said July is now the target date for completion of the housing project, which recently raised its roof prior to drywall construction. Designed by Martinez Cutri Architects, many of Bellamar's units exceed 2,000 square feet in size and are being priced in the low $1.1 million-range. It's a price the project's website claims “will be significantly lower than similar-sized units in the immediate area.” Bellamar features skyline and harbor views and has luxurious and sustainable amenities including an electric car charging station, rooftop deck and barbecue area. The housing project is in the heart of Point Loma Village and “Little Portugal.” For more information, visit bellamarpointloma.com. Concerning the eight jacaranda trees Point Loma Association planted and nurtured for so many years before construction began on the project site, developers are assuring that, when new landscaping goes in, it will include nine or 10 maturing jacaranda trees. The PLA member memorial plaques, rescued as construction began, have also been relocated. The new jacarandas will offer more locations for PLA families to memorialize the names of loved ones if they choose. I-5 ramp closures The northbound I-5 off-ramp at Balboa Avenue will be temporarily closed Friday, June 2 at 7 p.m. through Monday, June 5 at 5 a.m. Crews will install infrastructure to support a new railroad bridge on Balboa Avenue/Garnet Avenue. Changeable Message Signs will be placed in advance of the closure detouring motorists to take the northbound I-5 exit at Clairemont Drive/Mission Bay Drive. Additionally, between 6 and 8:30 a.m. on Sunday, June 4, motorists will encounter a series of intermittent traffic closures up to 10 minutes on northbound and southbound I-5 near Balboa Avenue. The rolling closures are needed to relocate electric distribution lines across the freeway. Ocean Beach Town Council logo contest The Ocean Beach Town Council is holding a logo design contest through June 5. They are looking for locals to submit logo designs that represent Ocean Beach’s unique community. The winner will receive a $250 Visa gift card, and their design will be on all OBTC materials. To submit a design, send it to info@obtowncouncil.org in vector format. OB signs remembered Ocean Beach Historical Society presenter Claudia Jack has an extensive Ocean Beach sign collection of the community's  most memorable and funny signs. She saved many signs that were on the way to being trashed or destroyed. Jack will also talk briefly on the importance of community volunteerism at 7 p.m. Thursday, June 15 at Point Loma United Methodist Church, 1984 Sunset Cliffs Blvd. Don’t miss this flash from the past as words and images trigger your memories of OB’s unique and colorful history. Peninsula Singers spring concert The Peninsula Singers will present “Inspirational Music” at its spring concert on Friday, June 9 from 7 to 8:15 p.m. at All Souls Episcopal Church, 1475 Catalina Blvd. Tickets are $15 for adults, $12 for students, seniors and military.  Children age 10 and under may attend for free. For more information or to purchase tickets, visit www.peninsulasingerssandiego.org. Music includes American spirituals, pieces from “Fiddler on the Roof,” “The Sound of Music,” and “Carousel”; and other uplifting popular and classical music selections. Peninsula Singers is a Community Choir based in Point Loma under the direction of Sarah Suhonen and accompanied by Stewart Simon on piano. The choir has performed at many venues throughout the community including the Point Loma Village Cultural Faire, Point Loma High School, several local libraries, and December Nights in Balboa Park. Established in 2003, Peninsula Singers is a committee of the nonprofit Ocean Beach Community Foundation. OB photo contest The Ocean Beach Town Council has started a "Share Your OB" photo contest. To enter just tag your best photos of OB with #shareyourOB and post on Instagram or Facebook. Winner receives bragging rights and is entered in a monthly drawing for some cool swag. Each Saturday, a new winner will be announced. So get out there and #shareyourOB.
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Women's Museum to unveil One Hundred Years of One Hundred Handbags exhibit
Published - 05/28/17 - 12:05 PM | 0 0 comments | 9 9 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Fashion, utility, lifestyle...handbags are intrinsically connected to how women live in modern society. This exhibit explores how women’s lives have shaped the fashion of handbags through a collection of one hundred handbags ranging from the 1850s to the 1950s. Peer into the style choices of a flapper, a pioneer, and a Victorian socialite and discover the origins of one of women’s most beloved accessory.
Fashion, utility, lifestyle...handbags are intrinsically connected to how women live in modern society. This exhibit explores how women’s lives have shaped the fashion of handbags through a collection of one hundred handbags ranging from the 1850s to the 1950s. Peer into the style choices of a flapper, a pioneer, and a Victorian socialite and discover the origins of one of women’s most beloved accessory.
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The Women's Museum of California (www.womensmuseumca.org) welcomes the public to explore a new fashion history exhibit in the museum gallery, One Hundred Years of One Hundred Handbags, running June 2 to July 2. This exhibit explores how women's lives have shaped the fashion of handbags through a collection of one hundred handbags ranging from the 1850s to the 1950s. The collection on display showcases the various forms women's purses have taken throughout the years. On June 2, alongside the new exhibit will be the revamped Historical Clothing Show, a staple of the Women's Museum's educational programming. This show presents a variety of women's clothing that showcases the history of fashion over the past 200 years. The fashion Show is open to public at 7 p.m. outside Barracks 16 in Liberty Station. This exhibit was made possible by a generous donation to the Women's Museum of 101 purses from Jean Nemer's private collection. She was former executive director of the Riverside YWCA and the March of Dimes. Nemer started collecting vintage purses 40 years ago and concentrated mostly on beaded and mesh bags from the early 1900's. "I have always loved the workmanship of these antique bags and tried to find out as much as I could about their origins. They are works of art owned and carried by women with interesting lives." Nemer is pleased to donate her collection to the Women's Museum, including two vintage bags owned by her grandmother Anna Larsen of Chicago. Friday, June 2 Exhibit opens at 5 p.m. Fashion Show starts at 7 p.m. Free to public – opening night
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Ocean Beach Woman’s Club – Laying a new foundation
Published - 05/27/17 - 07:35 AM | 0 0 comments | 11 11 recommendations | email to a friend | print
High surf destroys the Flatiron building on the corner of Newport and Abbott. / PHOTO COURTESY OF OCEAN BEACH HISTORICAL SOCIETY
High surf destroys the Flatiron building on the corner of Newport and Abbott. / PHOTO COURTESY OF OCEAN BEACH HISTORICAL SOCIETY
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(This article is the second in a series about the Ocean Beach Woman’s Club and the contributions they made, and continue to make, in the community for more than 93 years. Please consider helping their fundraising effort for new floors, which are in a state of disrepair. Donate via GoFundMe – search for Ocean Beach Woman’s Club – visit their Facebook page or email at updates@oceanbeachwomansclub.org. Your donation is tax deductible and will help them continue their philanthropic work in Ocean Beach.) We knew that when we volunteered to help develop this article series it would be fascinating to go through all the historical archives. However while pouring over meeting notes (many in beautiful, handwritten cursive), newspaper clippings, scrapbooks and photographs, nothing quite prepared us for this sentence written in February of 1944. “But, oh reader of the future…” It impressed upon us how these women were thinking of the collective us then, now and in the future. They expected the meticulous documentation of the work they did to be preserved and read again. Like us, they were concerned for their country, their community and their families. At that moment in time, that sentence was written to us. We were those future readers. It had a profound affect–and literally brought tears to our eyes. Cheers to the historians! And now, for some history… Location, location, location. When first established in 1924, the club met at homes, churches, halls and lodges. One common location was referred to as the Alligator Rock Lodge at Bacon and Coronado streets. Flatiron Building In April of 1927, the club leased the 200-foot-long Flatiron building located near Abbott and Newport. They met there for 14 years. In 1939 they suffered through a high tide flood that forced them to move out temporarily. Then in October 1941, tides destroyed the entire building. Homeless, the club then met at various locations, including the old Apple Tree Grocery location (CVS now), which they rented for $25 a month, and Wallace Hall in the Episcopal Church. They also purchased a location on Del Monte, as well as on the 4800 block of Newport, ultimately looking for a place they could call home. New home! In 1944 Mrs. Jean Rittenhouse deeded a plot of land at our current location of Bacon and Muir. The deed had strict stipulations “… given with the understanding that these lots are to be used as the site for a club house for the OBWC and should that organization abandon the property, fail to pay the taxes when due, attempt to sell the lots, or remove the proposed club house to any other location … the lots will immediately revert to the ownership of Jean Annette Rittenhouse or her heirs or assigns.” Now all they needed was a structure. A bungalow, once used as a Congregational Church and as a school room for Ocean Beach Elementary came up for auction. Armed with a mission, representatives for the club went to the auction. Bidding started at $10, and was ultimately purchased for $1,350. The meeting notes read, “But, mark well, reader of the future, this was another important day in the history of the Ocean Beach Woman’s Club. It marked the purchase of the School Bungalow for $1,350.” The building was moved onto the lot at our current location, and continues to serve us now. It’s important also to note that this all happened during WW II – a time when the primary focus of the OBWC was providing food, shelter, companionship and warmth to the servicemen patrolling our shores. The Service Men’s Club. More on that next issue. Submitted by the Ocean Beach Woman’s Club Floor Campaign Committee.
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Western-themed fair offers something for all, and also octopus on a stick
by SAVANAH DUFFY
Published - 05/27/17 - 07:07 AM | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
The fair will run from 4 p.m. on June 2 through July 4, with countless entertainment options, delicious and unique food creations, engaging craft areas, contests and exhibits. / Photo by Thomas Melville
The fair will run from 4 p.m. on June 2 through July 4, with countless entertainment options, delicious and unique food creations, engaging craft areas, contests and exhibits. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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Chicken Charlie's famous Krispy Kreme donut chicken sandwich with vanilla ice cream and Fruity Pebbles sprinkled on top. / Photo by Savanah Duffy
Chicken Charlie's famous Krispy Kreme donut chicken sandwich with vanilla ice cream and Fruity Pebbles sprinkled on top. / Photo by Savanah Duffy
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The burger is the Maui Cowboy from Tasti Burgers. / Photo by Savanah Duffy
The burger is the Maui Cowboy from Tasti Burgers. / Photo by Savanah Duffy
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A horse-shaped sculpture formed out of succulents, part of the Garden Show. / Photo by Savanah Duffy
A horse-shaped sculpture formed out of succulents, part of the Garden Show. / Photo by Savanah Duffy
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Whether you grew up on a farm and you can ride a horse like Hopalong Cassidy, or you don’t know the difference between a Clydesdale and a Shetland pony, San Diego County Fair’s “Where the West is Fun” promises a wide variety of fun and food that is guaranteed to appeal to all visitors. Presented by Albertsons and Vons, the fair will run from 4 p.m. on June 2 through July 4, with countless entertainment options, delicious and unique food creations, engaging craft areas, contests and exhibits. For a distinctly western feel, this year’s fair will include a speakeasy decorated as an opium den. To get in, hunt down a Jade Peacock card at one of the three bars on the fairgrounds and follow instructions from there, says the speakeasy bartender Tracy Brighouse. But anyone who has ever been to the San Diego County Fair knows that eating is just as important as drinking, if not more so. Tasti Burgers and Tasti Chips are back with their newest burger, the Maui Cowboy: A delicious combination of all-natural beef and spam (to add a Hawaiian flair, says owner Lori Southerlend), with veggies, jalapeños and chipotle mayo to add an extra kick to this cowboy burger. Reno’s Fish and Chips and Pignotti’s Pasta are trying out some new things this year as well. Both are family businesses owned by Ken McKnight, his wife Cathy and their son Taylor. Reno’s Fish and Chips will be featuring octopus on a stick, which McKnight assures customers has been gutted and cleaned. McKnight credits the idea of octopus on a stick to Cathy. According to McKnight, this latest seafood addition has been receiving positive feedback. “It looks kind of weird,” McKnight says, but adds, “It’s [about] how it tastes, and everyone seems to like it.” In addition to octopus on a stick, Reno’s will still be serving their classic fish and chips, shark tacos and shrimp tacos. The Pignotti’s Pasta stand is switching things up by adding fried ravioli to their menu, the first time the business has ever sold fried food. Customers can choose between cheese ravioli on a stick or buffalo chicken on a stick, with marinara, alfredo or ranch sauce. In addition to keeping visitors well-fed, the fair’s Whole Life Festival will occur on July 1 to promote healthy lifestyles and natural living. Included in this festival is The Expert in Life Program, which according to volunteer staff member Pam Reed, includes lessons on the art of deep meditation and self-empowerment, taught by Erhard Vogel, Ph.D., one of the most highly-acclaimed meditation teachers in the world, according to the Nataraja Meditation and Yoga Center. Also included is the San Diego-based company Organifi, which is best known for selling their green juice made of 11 different gently dehydrated superfoods that supplies the body with a natural energy and contributes to good health all throughout the body, says Kori-ann Kobayashi, director of events and expo. As always, the fair welcomes everyone with open arms with various multicultural festivals. The Asian Festival will be composed of cultures from China, India, Hawaii and more. The new addition to the Asian Festival is an Asian art exhibit at 17 Hands Restaurant and Bar, along with Sake flights at the Paddock Tavern. The Mariachi Festival takes place on June 11, newly featuring tequila sampling and a piñata for the public to take a swing at. Another trek through the fair starts off with the Flower Show in O’Brien Hall, one of the fair’s most eye-catching exhibits. Here you’ll find yourself in Pauline’s Prairie Home, based on The “Little House on the Prairie” series, put together by Flower Show coordinator Betty Patterson-del Sol. The hall will exhibit flowers, floral arrangement and specimen contests. There will even be Ikebana floral design for the Asian Fair on June 3, and the master from Japan will be giving a demonstration on the outdoor stage on June 4 to instruct guests on the art of flower arrangements. A sensory garden is a new addition to the O’Brien flower exhibit this year, allowing guests a hands-on experience with the plants. “You can feel it, you can rub it, you can smash it, you can see how those flower act,” says Patterson-del Sol. If you’re in the VIP section on Father’s Day June 18, you can stop at the Charity Wings Art and Craft Center to make beer box visors and other beer bottle crafts with your son or daughter. If you’re not in the VIP section, check out some of the other crafts. Food, drink, music, exhibits, festivals and competitions are just the start of what this year’s San Diego Fair has to offer. For more information, visit sdfair.com. San Diego County Fair Where: Del Mar Fairgrounds. When: 4 p.m. on June 2 through July 4. Info: sdfair.com
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San Diego Quality of Life report shows little progress toward sustainability efforts
by JONATHAN LO
Published - 05/27/17 - 07:06 AM | 0 0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Last week, the Center for Sustainable Energy’s Equinox Project presented its eighth edition of the San Diego Regional Quality of Life Dashboard. The yearly report tracks San Diego’s progress in its sustainability efforts. For this year, six economic and environmental indicators show a positive trend, six more changed negatively, and three remained neutral – overall, not much has changed. The six fields that showed improvement from 2015 are climate action plans, electrified transportation, employment, renewable energy, and residential electricity and water use. The six that regressed were landfill waste disposal, beach water quality, housing affordability, traffic, entrepreneurship, and air quality. The last three indicators, which showed neutral change, were park access, transportation choices, and cross-border metrics. Xavier Leonard, the director of civic engagement for the San Diego Foundation, focused on how water is significant to the San Diego region. “Water is the lifeblood of any regional economy and the businesses that make up our three major industries: tourism, innovation, and military all rely on clean and stable water supplies,” Leonard said. Under emergency drought declaration, San Diego residential water consumption dropped by a whopping 15 percent in one year, the lowest level in at least 17 years. Cody Hooven, chief sustainability officer for the City of San Diego, declared that the City of San Diego believes that economy and environment are vitally tied together. With the data provided by the dashboard the city and other leaders can more make informed decisions on policy and climate action plans moving forward. Moreover, Hoover noted that even though entrepreneurship has decreased over the past year, innovation, especially in the clean tech industry, has made great strides and unemployment rates are continuing on a downward trend, with the highest rates of job growth in real estate and construction. Mayor Serge Dedina of Imperial Beach passionately spoke on the issue of maintaining the beaches. “Beaches are more than just a beach, they are our most important open space. What we are learning when these beaches are closed is that we cut off the fabric of our community life here in San Diego. We are the beach. The beach is the engine of our happiness and our quality of life,” Dedina said. Water quality closures at the beach this year have increased by 14 percent, from 81 days to 92 days, mainly because of rain. Mission Bay and Imperial Beach were the hardest hit areas. Dedina emphasized that restoration efforts in creeks and rivers are critical in maintaining the quality of life for beaches. “It’s one region, one coast, one ocean, working together,” Dedina said. Colin Parent, policy counsel at Circulate San Diego City Councilmember of La Mesa, stressed the importance of tracking transportation. “Transportation is an important quality of life factor but it also represents the single largest contributor of greenhouse gasses of any sector in the region,” he said. Parent praised the fact that a substantially higher number of electric vehicles were purchased this year. This benefits air quality as well as quality of life but Parent recognized there is much more to work on. “While vehicle miles traveled have not increased, we have seen an increase in the amount of time people are spending travelling.” This means more cars are spending time stuck on the highway burning fossil fuels and emitting greenhouse gasses. “We’ve also had similar problems with the share of people who take transit or ride bikes to work,” continued Councilman Parent. “We have about a four percent mode share in the region and that’s substantially less than other jurisdictions.” Mitch Mitchell, with SDG&E, said, “In San Diego we sometimes get lost in the blue skies and the beaches and the bays and we think we have everything here. But when you stop and look at the dashboard it shows you there is room for improvement, there are other efforts we can make to better quality of life.” According to Mitchell, SDG&E is highly interested in clean air. San Diego had more unhealthy air days in 2016 than 2015, partially because of a growing economy. As a response, SDG&E invested resources into renewable energy. Currently, 43 percent of energy from SDG&E is from renewable sources, with a future goal of 50 percent. SDG&E’s secondary focus is on transportation. Mitchell echoed Councilman Parent’s arguments and further added, “The area we are struggling most, the area with the greatest impact on air quality, is transportation. Forty to fifty percent of our air quality problems are caused by emissions.” SDG&E has been vocal for the past two years about the need for more electric vehicles as well as converting diesel trucks to natural gas. Mitchell also lamented on the lack of charging stations for electric vehicles. He believes that if people see more available charging stations in public areas, they will be encouraged to purchase and use electric vehicles. All speakers agreed on one point: the Quality of Life Dashboard is an incredible tool to help groups target and plan for pressing quality of life issues in the San Diego region. This year the report is available online, which provides ease of access for anyone who wants to inform themselves as well as use the data to make decisions. Moreover, this allows data to be updated quickly as soon as new information is uncovered. To see the data yourself and to find more information, visit SDQualityOfLife.org
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