Emergency call conflict: OB Town Council invites SD fire chief and lifeguard union leader to forum
Published - 04/24/17 - 03:24 PM | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
The Ocean Beach Town Council has invited San Diego Fire Department Chief Brian Fennessy and Ed Harris, leader of the San Diego Lifeguard Union, to the 7 p.m. April 26 meeting, at the Masonic Center, 1711 Sunset Cliffs Blvd., to speak on a recent policy change in the way that water distress calls are handled by the city. Jeff Hatfield, former lifeguard president, longtime Ocean Beach resident, and lifeguard dispatcher will also sit on the panel. As the city heads into the summer months, the goal of all public agencies is to keep residents and visitors safe at San Diego beaches, bays, and waterways. The new emergency procedure, which was implemented by the SDFD chief on Dec. 15, 2016, routes water distress calls not directly to the lifeguards, but first through 911 dispatch, and then to fire dispatch, before being transferred to the lifeguard unit. San Diego lifeguards contend that the change adds an unnecessary step, slowing down the lifeguards' emergency response time. Ed Harris stated: “Distressed persons witnessing a water emergency must now wait until their call is sent to all three emergency dispatch centers before a radio call is made to the only people who can help them. The change sends the call from police dispatch to fire dispatch. “Fire logs it in the computer and then notifies Lifeguard dispatch who finally makes a radio call to the nearest lifeguard. Each time a call is sent to a dispatch center, there is a delay. The Fire Chief has added a step that does not need to be added,” Harris said. The meeting will be dedicated in part to fostering a dialogue in regards to this important public safety issue. For more information, please contact the OBTC via email at info@obtowncouncil.org. The object and purpose of the Ocean Beach Town Council is to express the will and represent the welfare of the community of Ocean Beach by providing a forum for the discussion of community issues, communicating the views and needs of the community to the appropriate agencies, and promoting the general betterment and beautification of Ocean Beach. The OBTC hosts public meetings on the fourth Wednesday every month except November and December. Regular speakers include local leaders, political, business and law enforcement representatives, as well as members from all corners of the Ocean Beach community.
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April 22-29 is National Infant Immunization Week, and the County Health and Human Services Agency is reminding parents to make sure their children are up-to-date with immunizations.
April 22-29 is National Infant Immunization Week, and the County Health and Human Services Agency is reminding parents to make sure their children are up-to-date with immunizations.
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José A. Álvarez

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County reminds parents that it’s National Infant Immunization Week
by José A. Álvarez
Published - 04/24/17 - 02:27 PM | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
April 22-29 is National Infant Immunization Week, and the County Health and Human Services Agency is reminding parents to make sure their children are up-to-date with immunizations.
April 22-29 is National Infant Immunization Week, and the County Health and Human Services Agency is reminding parents to make sure their children are up-to-date with immunizations.
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Fourteen. This is the number of vaccines children should get over their first 18 months to avoid getting sick. April 22-29 is National Infant Immunization Week, and the County Health and Human Services Agency is reminding parents to make sure their children are up-to-date with immunizations. “Vaccines offer the best protection against disease,” said Wilma Wooten, M.D., M.P.H., county public health officer. “Parents should make sure their children start their shots on time and stay on schedule. Immunizations prevent disease, disability, and in the worst cases, death.” Parents should ask their doctor or clinic to check their child’s immunization record and make sure their baby is up-to-date. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends infants get shots at birth, 2, 4, 6, 12, 15, and 18 months of age to protect them against many diseases including measles, meningitis and whooping cough. Surveys indicate that vaccination coverage among San Diego County kindergarteners is near an all-time high. During the current school year, 1,059 of more than 46,000 local kindergartners were missing some or all recommended vaccines. However, about 45,000 babies are born every year and they should be immunized on time to stay healthy. Babies are not the only ones who should be vaccinated. Parents, older siblings, grandparents, and babysitters also need to be up to date. High immunization coverage levels mean fewer people get sick from vaccine-preventable diseases. “No child, adolescent, or adult should suffer from a vaccine-preventable disease,” said Wooten, adding that making sure children have all the recommended vaccines is part of Live Well San Diego, a vision for healthy, safe and thriving residents. “Immunizations are the best thing parents can do to protect their children from serious disease.” For more information on immunizations and the diseases they prevent, parents should contact their health care provider, visit www.sdiz.org or call the County Immunization Branch at (866) 358-2966.
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City homeless 'czar' Stacie Spector speaks at the Midway Community Planning Group meeting. / Photo by Dave Schwab
City homeless 'czar' Stacie Spector speaks at the Midway Community Planning Group meeting. / Photo by Dave Schwab
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