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    What does Hubbs-SeaWorld Research Institute do? It’s scientists are studying impacts of global warming on animal systems
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Aug 25, 2019 | 1357 views | 0 0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Dr. Brent Stewart with king penguins in Antarctica.
    Dr. Brent Stewart with king penguins in Antarctica.
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    Going to and from Pacific Beach via Ingraham Street, you’ve probably passed Hubbs-SeaWorld Research Institute without hardly noticing it — or realizing what it does. While determining the cause of global warming is not Hubbs-SeaWorld Research Institute’s mission – that’s left to others like La Jolla’s Scripps Research Institution – but responding to the consequences of global warming, however, is what Hubbs-SeaWorld is all about. “We’re on the front end of trying to understand what the impacts of global warming are to wild populations and animal systems, and how we can help overcome that,” said Donald B. Kent, Hubbs-SeaWorld Research Institute president/CEO. “We’re not about predicting doomsday. We’re trying to avoid doomsday by saying, ‘This is what we need to do.’” Added Kent: “We’re studying the impacts of (global warming) on our food supply. Can we farm the sea if we can’t catch any more fish? What happens if we have heat domes in harvest season? Or if it rains too much and crops are destroyed?” Headquartered at Perez Cove in Mission Bay, with a smaller facility in Florida, the nonprofit scientific research foundation is committed to providing innovative scientific solutions to challenges facing ocean health. The goal is to conserve and renew marine life ensuring a healthier planet.  The institute began in 1963 when SeaWorld co-founder Milton C. Shedd, an avid fisherman and conservationist, recognized the importance of developing and nurturing scientific nonprofit research with the intent “to return to the sea some measure of the benefits derived from it.” The research foundation was later rededicated as Hubbs-SeaWorld Research Institute honoring Dr. Carl Leavitt Hubbs and his inspiring achievements in ocean science and education. From 1944 to 1969, Hubbs taught biology at SIO and at UC San Diego in La Jolla. Hubbs did research in commercial and recreational fishing, observing changes in fish population patterns that depend on the fluctuation in Pacific Ocean temperatures.  Hubbs-SeaWorld Research Institute’s four main study areas are: Sustainable seafood (aquaculture), restoring depleted fish populations; animal behavior (bioacoustics), sound impacts on animal behavior; wildlife populations (ecology); and ocean health (physiology). Kent recently led a tour through Hubbs-SeaWorld Research Institute and showed off its labs, tanks and research facilities. We met Ann Bowles, a senior research scientist, who was busy with numerous projects, including studying the impact of plane noise on endangered bird species such as the least Bell’s vireo, and the California gnatcatcher at Camp Pendleton. “For many years we’ve been concerned about the effects of aircraft noise on birds with the addition of helicopters at Camp Pendleton,” said Bowles. “We measured the quality of the bird’s habitat, kept track of temperatures, things not done in the past. It turns out that stuff (habitat quality) explained their reproductive success, not noise (impact), which was subtle.” “We try not to be advocates for anything other than good science,” said Kent, showing huge vats in the back of Hubbs-SeaWorld Research Institute where experiments are being conducted on farming of edible fish species like halibut, yellowtail tuna and white sea bass. “These are self-cleaning tanks that we put fish eggs in and harvest,” said Kent. “In 50 to 60 days, we can harvest 150,000 juveniles out of a tank like this.” Fish harvests can be enhanced by adjusting elements like night/day and water temperature. Noted Kent: “We want to learn what kind of diets can we use to grow fish that don’t use fish meal? Can we use trimming left over from filleting? Or use soybeans or soy as an alternative? We’re experimenting with that now.” Admitted Kent, “I’m very worried about how we’re going to feed ourselves in the future.” Noting that “everything in life is trial and error,” Kent said, “We’ve learned a lot based on things that didn’t work. When something works, you try to refine it a little bit more.” Ongoing experiments at Hubbs-SeaWorld Research Institute could prove to be one answer to “farming” the world’s oceans and safeguarding the planet’s food supplies. “The idea is to find a diet that feeds fish more cheaply, while still maintaining the health and quality of the product,” Kent said. “If wild fish costs $12 a pound, and cultured fish is $5 a pound, more people can buy it and enjoy a healthy meal.” Concluded Kent: “That’s what we focus on. Can we grow a fish that is less expensive than catching a fish? Can we offset global warming producing different kinds of protein products that are safe for the environment?”
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    Mission Bay Cluster gets back to school
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Aug 23, 2019 | 3709 views | 0 0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    The cluster’s six schools — MBHS, Barnard Mandarin Magnet Elementary, Crown Point Junior Music Academy, Pacific Beach Elementary, Pacific Beach Middle and Kate Sessions — all resume instruction Monday, Aug. 26.
    The cluster’s six schools — MBHS, Barnard Mandarin Magnet Elementary, Crown Point Junior Music Academy, Pacific Beach Elementary, Pacific Beach Middle and Kate Sessions — all resume instruction Monday, Aug. 26.
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    Returning Mission Bay Cluster students are going to see lots of change and improvement as both Mission Bay High and Pacific Beach Middle schools are undergoing major refits, while schools cluster wide get new air conditioning. The cluster’s six schools — MBHS, Barnard Mandarin Magnet Elementary, Crown Point Junior Music Academy, Pacific Beach Elementary, Pacific Beach Middle and Kate Sessions — all resume instruction Monday, Aug. 26. Mission Bay High “Schools districtwide are going through whole site modernization: It’s exciting times,” said Ernie Remillard, principal of the high school built in 1953. “The other big components (at MBHS) are a whole new engineering building, new game design space for college career technical education, new carpet and paint in many of our classrooms, upgrades to the cafeteria, some exterior work and an auxiliary gym, all finishing up in October.” Remillard added the 65-year-old school’s sewer lines and other infrastructure are gradually being replaced. Bathrooms are also being updated and being made ADA-compliant.  “Our IB program, the ability of our kids to take college-level classes on our campus, continues to grow and flourish,” added Remillard. “Our athletics, choral group and music program are all second to none.” Pacific Beach Middle This summer, Pacific Beach Middle’s site modernization began with demolition of an old building and construction of a new two-story classroom building and three new classrooms in the existing library media center. Principal Kimberly Meng noted building deconstruction took place this summer to avoid distractions this fall. Touring the refurbished counseling center, Meng noted, “The white walls are dry erase. This is a beautiful new space.” Communications, safety and security have all been upgraded at PBMS. “We got a new fire alarm and phone system with an intercom to every classroom, and a new PA system, both inside and out, for emergencies,” Meng said. “All our locks are now accessed only by staff with key cards that are electronically scanned. The school is locked all day, and the only way you can get in or out is through your key card.” Barnard Mandarin Magnet Elementary Students from Barnard’s graduating class traveled to China this summer, culminating their six years in a Mandarin immersion language program. Besides exploring Chinese culture, the trip provided a prime opportunity for students to show off their language skills acquired at Barnard. PB Elementary  Listing what the school has to celebrate this year, principal Denise Goulart said: “Higher test scores, a return of extraordinary programs, and quality instructors, which make PBES an amazing place to grow and learn. We are in our second year of a Science Technology Engineering Arts and Math (STEAM) grant, where students learn the importance of design thinking and innovation. PBES welcomes Debra Peacock, our new education specialist, and Miguel Cortes, our new phys ed coach. We can’t wait to start the new school year.” Crown Point Junior Music Academy “At Crown Point, we believe that music opens minds,” said principal Armando Lopez. “Our students can not only receive instruction in all content areas, but enhanced music instruction as well. Our free Suzuki Violin Program is a unique program that involves not only the students, but the parents.” Added Lopez: “We capped off last year with tremendous concerts at our school. Additionally, we showcased our students in a multicultural fair with music, singing, dancing and arts and crafts from countries including Japan, Taiwan, Poland, Croatia, India and Italy. We look forward to offering our full curriculum, including our newly implemented STEAM program starting in transitional kindergarten.” Kate Sessions Kate Sessions Elementary blends local students, those living in military housing and special-education students choosing the school because of its programs. “Our vision is to become a world-class school where we create learning experiences that foster student inquiry by promoting critical thinking, problem-solving and developing moral integrity,” states the school’s website. “Our Parent-Teacher Organization supports our academic program by funding a vocal music teacher, art teacher and a librarian. We offer Spanish language instruction for all grades kindergarten through fifth grade, and computer literacy classes for grades 3-5. Our Gifted and Talented Education programs are infused with International Baccalaureate elements that bring the real world into the classroom.” The first Mission Bay Cluster meeting is Sept. 5 at MBHS Library. Future Bucs Night is Oct. 18 at MBHS stadium. At the Feb. 6 MB Cluster meeting, there will be a presentation/discussion about all of the STEM opportunities at PB schools in MBHS’s brand new engineering building. PBMS is under construction and anticipates finishing in winter of 2021.
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    Junior Lifeguards learn the ropes in Mission Beach
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Aug 22, 2019 | 7920 views | 0 0 comments | 9 9 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Junior Lifeguards train during a session on Mission Beach.
    Junior Lifeguards train during a session on Mission Beach.
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    Student intern Ava Smith, coordinator Doug Smith, and intern coordinator Kylie Vogel.
    Student intern Ava Smith, coordinator Doug Smith, and intern coordinator Kylie Vogel.
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    On Aug. 15, aspiring teen lifeguards learned what it’s like to actually work in the field, being schooled by Junior Lifeguard interns at Mission Beach on first-aid and water-rescue techniques.  That day, lifeguard hopefuls, in a bootcamp-style setting, got the chance to shadow Junior Lifeguard interns for a day of mentorship and learning. The Junior Lifeguard Program teaches youth ages 7 to 17 important life and safety skills, including water-rescue techniques, first aid and CPR.  It was a dress rehearsal for Junior Lifeguard Internship Program participants, many of whom will go on to become seasonal and professional lifeguards with San Diego Fire Department or other agencies. Starting out at Santa Clara Recreation Center, the day combined fun, camaraderie and hard work for 26 teen junior lifeguard interns. This year’s intern field, for the first time, was more female than male, 19 women and seven men. “We like to empower these females and give them the confidence that they really can do this job,” said San Diego Junior Lifeguard intern coordinator Lauren Leisk.   “We give them individualized lifeguard training on rescue swimming and first aid, the things they’re going to need when they try out to become lifeguards.” Added Leisk, “We go over to the beach and train them on how to rescue someone with their fins and rescue boards, train them on water observation, and on how to properly package someone on a backboard, how to splint someone off with a broken arm.” Interns are hired and paid to support City lifeguard staff during the program’s two, four-week summer aquatic education sessions. Aug. 15 was especially significant for at least one of this year’s female interns, Ava Smith from Northern California. She failed on her first attempt at becoming a Junior Lifeguard intern, but returned for a second try and succeeded. “It’s my dream job,” said Smith, adding she was “absolutely devastated,” after falling short the first time. Asked why she wants to be a lifeguard, Smith answered: “Being able to make a difference and save people’s lives. Being an intern is kind of a sneak peak at that.” Smith ran 12 miles and swam four miles that day. Other program interns had run six miles and swam two. “It’s not fun in the moment when you’re doing push ups or running a mile, but when you look back at it, you have such fond memories,” Smith said. During the day, lifeguard interns ran relay races on the beach. They also swam out in pairs to marked ocean buoys, with one swimmer “rescuing” the other and bringing them ashore. “The Junior Lifeguard Program is a unique learning opportunity for young men and women in San Diego, and our interns are an expression of that,” said Lifeguard chief James Gartland. “Junior lifeguards look up to interns and find inspiration in knowing that hard work and dedication will often yield personal growth and leadership roles.” The Junior Lifeguard Program is funded by the City of San Diego with support from the Prevent Drowning Foundation of San Diego.
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    Mission Beach woman cleans and crusades against littering at beach
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Aug 21, 2019 | 8753 views | 8 8 comments | 9 9 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Just some of the trash Cathy Ives picks up daily at Mission Beach. / Courtesy photo
    Just some of the trash Cathy Ives picks up daily at Mission Beach. / Courtesy photo
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    Cathy Ives is mad as hell and she’s not going to take it anymore. What she’s upset about is trash and irresponsible behavior at Mission Beach. “I am done with the amount of drinking on the beach,” said Ives, who cleans up beach trash daily from the jetty to Belmont Park oceanfront. “Friday morning I picked up more than 100 glass beer bottles. Sunday I picked up more than 50 glass beer bottles at Belmont Park. And there were five to seven illegal fires still burning, strewn with liquor bottles, glass, aluminum and plastic. It is too much.” Noting glass bottles of any kind are forbidden everywhere on the beach any time, Ives added bottles and trash from fires are just a part of overall beach pollution. Ives tried reporting beach clean-up issues on the City’s Get It Done App, but was not satisfied with the response.“They (city) said it needs to go to the police,” she said. “But there’s no place to put it, I reported it under illegal dumping, and they (police) said it needs to go someplace else.” Ives was told at a Mission Beach Town Council meeting by a police representative that SDPD does not have the resources to do beach cleanup. Ives has been complaining to various government agencies about beach cleanup problems for the past 18 months and continues to document the issues providing photos. “I have a whole Facebook album just devoted to this,” she said. Ives is requesting that the City enforce its laws requiring: • No drinking on the beach; • No smoking on the beach; • No glass bottles on the beach; • No fires directly on sand on the beach; • Enforcement of littering laws. “Public safety is our top priority,” said José Ysea, supervising public information officer for City of San Diego. “During the summer months, the City of San Diego beefs up police and lifeguard presence in our beach areas. With 17 miles of coastline our personnel work diligently to enforce all laws and rules along our beaches and bays. “As in any of our other communities, we not only encourage, but rely on the public to be our eyes and ears when they see or hear something wrong. If they witness anyone in distress or see a dangerous situation, we ask that they call 9-1-1 immediately,” Ysea said. “If they have non-emergency issues, we ask that they use our Get-it-Done app available on Android and Apple devices, as well as at sandiego.gov/getitdone,” Ysea said. “As part of Mayor Kevin Faulconer’s CleanSD initiative, we now have clean-up crews working 24 hours a day, seven days a week. This has sped up our response time for reports relating to trash and debris.” Ives has some recommendations for how beach enforcement should be improved.  “The number one thing is better signage,” Ives said. “I am advocating they enforce the ordinances and put up big signs saying, ‘No drinking, no glass. no styrofoam.’” Ives also cautioned that Mission Beach is not being patrolled at the right times. “The police need to start patrolling on the sand from the jetty to north Mission Beach from 11 p.m. to 4 a.m., not 6 a.m.,” she argued. “That is ‘not’ when the action is happening. They should be giving tickets, fines. Pointing out styrofoam is now banned because it’s not biodegradable, Ives noted the material is winding up in boogie boards nonetheless. “There is no enforcement,” she said. “Stores should have stopped selling those, as well as styrofoam ice chests.” Concerning plastic straws, which state law is gradually phasing out requiring them to be requested in restaurants, Ives noted, “There are more straws on the beach now than ever.” Concerning fires, Ives said: “It’s illegal to put them directly in the sand. They need to be in a portable device or in a fire pit. Due to the still-warm fires, I have had to ‘encircle' the fires with bottles or toys.There is nobody to put out the illegal still-burning fires.” Ives noted the jetty has 10 illegal fire pits strewn with trash. “I can't even tell you how bad Bonita Point is,” she said. “Between the people sleeping in cars, the drunks sleeping on the beach … it is awful.” Ives added the Mission Beach jetty has become especially troublesome. “Rats are out in full force at the jetty,” she warned. “You got rid of the cats that killed the rats. Do you know that hepatitis A can be spread this way?” Worst of all, said Ives: “There is broken glass everywhere – on the beach, in the parking lots, in the picnic areas, on the boardwalk. Another resident in less than a week picked up more than 200 pounds of glass, mainly beer bottles in less than a mile. He has been living here for years and states it is the worst he has ever seen.” Added Ives: “The trashcans are filled with glass bottles. The tide line is strewn with glass bottles and cigarettes, food wrappers, and clothing. I’ve washed more than 900 beach towels, some from hotels, and blankets left on the beach and donated them, as well as 115 beach toys, all left behind.” Responding to clean-up complaints from Mission Beach residents, District 2 Councilmember Dr. Jen Campbell said: “Keeping our beaches clean is a prime concern for my office. We’ve been in contact with Environmental Services to ensure that the additional Clean SD money that was approved this year in the city’s budget is focused on our beaches and boardwalks.”
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    Carolina peter
    |
    August 24, 2019
    Hello everyone I'm Carolina peter and am here to share the wonderful work Dr tunde did for me. After 4 years in marriage with my husband with 2 kids, my husband started acting weird and going out with other women and showed me cold love, on several occasions he threatens to divorce me if I dare question him about his affair with other women, I was totally devastated and confused until a old friend of mine told me about a spell caster on the internet called Dr. tunde who help people with relationship and marriage problem by the powers of love spells, at first I doubted if such thing ever exists but decided to give it a try, when I contact him, he helped me cast a love spell and within 48hours my husband come back to me and started apologizing, now he has stopped going out with other women and his with me for good and for real. Contact this great love spell caster for your relationship or marriage problem to be solved today via email: babatundesolutioncentre1@gmail.com or call or whatsapp: 2348143581382 Also specialize in treating all kinds of illness, HERPES VIRUS, HEPATITIS B, CANCER, BRAIN DISEASE, INFERTILITY, DIABETES AND MORE.

    Lee Silber
    |
    August 22, 2019
    Thank you Cathy for all you are doing. It's appreciated.
    Roberto787
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    August 22, 2019
    SD used to be a beautiful city, America's finest city. What happened? Though I miss it sometimes, I'm very happy to have moved to another city/state. I do not see any improvement in the near future. Every time I visit, it seems it's getting worse. From the trash, homeless population, ridiculous parking fees. It reminds me of Waikiki, HI where it's populated by tourists, not the locals. Sad really.
    Hector Sanchez
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    August 22, 2019
    That's fine...stay wherever you are at and we'll gladly stay here.
    GNK1096
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    August 22, 2019
    Having grown up in MB from 63-77, MB is FAR cleaner now then it was back then. Still needs work, and good on Cathy Ives for trying to make it even better.
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    August 22, 2019
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    Petals by the Beach uses donation to spread kindness through flowers
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Aug 20, 2019 | 3111 views | 0 0 comments | 10 10 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Some of the recipients of free flowers at Petals by the Beach.
    Some of the recipients of free flowers at Petals by the Beach.
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    Some of the recipients of free flowers at Petals by the Beach.
    Some of the recipients of free flowers at Petals by the Beach.
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    A beach florist got an unusual contribution and request recently: $500 from a Pacific Beach woman to pass out flowers to random passers-by. “We have never seen such generosity and kindness,” enthused Melissa Cummings, co-owner, along with her mom, of Petals by the Beach at 1470 Garnet Ave. “She wanted to spread kindness to the people of her community, to show that there are still kind people out there despite our world problems. It was enough to pay for flowers every day for two weeks. That was pretty cool.” The donation came from Pacific Beach resident Thera Storm, who is a grief counselor. Storm said the recent back-to-back mass shootings in Texas and Ohio, that left at least 31 people dead, prompted her to do something extraordinary. “After those two shootings within 13 hours of each other, I noticed the reaction on Facebook was just so scary and negative,” said Storm. “The next morning I sat down and thought, ‘What could I do that’s positive?’ Then I had the idea of donating money to a local flower shop.” Storm was almost afraid of the reaction she’d get from Cummings, whom she didn’t know, when she approached her with her unorthodox plan.  But Storm shouldn’t have worried. “She donated a generous amount at our shop for us to pass out flowers to complete strangers,” said Cummings. “She wasn’t paying it forward. In her words, ‘She wanted to spread kindness to the masses.’” Cummings took Storm’s money and honored her request. “For two weeks I’ve been passing out flowers every day to random people walking by of all different ages,” Cummings said, adding she wasn’t embarrassed about it.  “I just said, ‘We had a customer recently donate a significant amount of money, and we’re spreading kindness and happiness.’” The reaction to Storm’s flower donation has been uplifting. “People said that is so nice, we need more of that,” said Cummings, adding, “A few people even cried. I began taking pictures (of recipients) and putting them on our Facebook and Instagram pages.” “I feel like I had a very small, passive role,” said Storm of her gesture. “All of the work has been done by Melissa.” It’s Storm's practice to take 10 percent of every paycheck and stash it away to do something special at a later date.  Asked if being a grief counselor factors into her humanitarianism, Storm said, “I’m just very aware that tomorrow isn’t guaranteed. And to have that moment of randomly being blessed with some flowers, that just helps folks who are sad. “I love helping people and watching them feel like I removed a backpack of bricks from them. I love flowers. Flowers was a nice gesture. I just hope they have a positive impact on people.”
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