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    Mayor calls for new law to ban vehicle habitation; also plans to expand Safe Parking Program
    Mar 25, 2019 | 5077 views | 0 0 comments | 12 12 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Mayor Kevin L. Faulconer makes the announcement on March 25 in a parking lot off Mission Bay Drive. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Mayor Kevin L. Faulconer makes the announcement on March 25 in a parking lot off Mission Bay Drive. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    Mayor Kevin L. Faulconer announced on March 25, while standing in a parking lot off Mission Bay Drive with the bay in the background, that he will bring forward a new ordinance to ban the proliferation of people living in vehicles on residential streets and parking lots. At the same time, the City will expand the existing Safe Parking Program to provide safe and secure places where individuals can stay at night while they work toward a permanent housing solution. In response to hundreds of complaints from residents about cleanliness and illegal activity related to people living out of vehicles, Faulconer was joined by District 2 Councilmember Jen Campbell, Police Chief David Nisleit and community leaders to outline plans to once again make vehicle habitation illegal in the City of San Diego. “I applaud the mayor’s action today, which balances the need to provide more assistance and services to San Diegans living in their vehicles in need of a helping hand with the concerns about health and safety we’ve heard from our beach communities,” Campbell said. Faulconer plans to introduce the new ordinance at the April 17 Public Safety and Livable Neighborhoods committee meeting – ahead of the busiest time of year for beach communities, which are most heavily impacted by the influx of people living what some refer to as “van life.” The new law would replace a previous ordinance that the City Council repealed in response to a court ruling that deemed it too vague to enforce. The repeal left the City unable to ticket offenders. “If you are living out of your vehicle because you have nowhere else to go, we want to help you,” Faulconer said. “At the same time, residents and businesses have a right to clean and safe neighborhoods. We will not allow conduct that takes advantage of San Diego’s generosity and destroys the quality of life in our communities.” Last year, the City, in partnership with Jewish Family Service, expanded the Safe Parking Program in two parking lots in Kearny Mesa. Faulconer said he will add three additional lots in different parts of the City, with more than 100 new spaces for cars and recreational vehicles. Locations and operational specifics are being finalized. Every night, JFS operates a Safe Parking Program for unsheltered San Diegans living out of their vehicles, many of whom are experiencing homelessness for the first time. The program provides parking spaces for more than 100 cars, serving more than 200 adults and children. Services offered include basic needs assistance, employment, family wellness, school success, financial education, credit repair and housing navigation. Since the City expanded the program, more than 30 families have transitioned to long-term and permanent housing.
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    La Jolla Playhouse’s world premiere musical, ‘Diana,’ a crown jewel
    by LUCIA VITI
    Mar 23, 2019 | 10887 views | 0 0 comments | 6 6 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Jeanna de Waal as Lady Diana, Princess of Wales, and Roe Hartrampf as Prince Charles during a scene of La Jolla Playhouse’s musical ‘Diana.’
    Jeanna de Waal as Lady Diana, Princess of Wales, and Roe Hartrampf as Prince Charles during a scene of La Jolla Playhouse’s musical ‘Diana.’
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    Electrifying. Remarkable. Exciting. Entertaining. Wow! The La Jolla Playhouse world premiere of “Diana,” the musical, delivers in leaps and bounds. Artistic director Christopher Ashley along with an incredible backdrop of superb talent, knocks the Broadway bound endeavor out of the ballpark. “Diana” touches upon the world’s fascination with the royal family by glimpsing into the austerity of her majesty’s kingdom from behind the castle walls. Sequencing events of the “People’s Princess” from the bells of London’s St. Paul’s Cathedral to the black Mercedes sedan crashing into a pillar of the Pont d’Alma tunnel in Paris, “Diana” captivates with “epic” and “sweeping” musical forays. Composer David Bryan, writer-lyricist Joe DiPietro, choreographer Kelly Devine and musical director, arranger and conductor-keyboardist Ian Eisendrath – along with his nine-piece orchestra – lead four main characters in front of a talented ensemble. Costume designer William Ivey Long exposes Diana as the ultimate fashion icon by showcasing her eye for style. Set designer David Zinn, lighting-designer Natasha Katz, and sound engineer Gareth Owen complete the nuts and bolts of staging and sound. “Diana’s” star, British actress Jeanna de Waal, leads counterparts Roe Hartrampf, as Prince Charles, Erin Davie as Camilla Parker-Bowles and Judy Kaye as Queen Elizabeth. De Waal, the first to test for the coveted role, left the powers that be a clear-cut message upon completion of her audition, “This is my role, don’t even think of anyone else.” “Diana” juxtaposes honesty with talent. Despite the makings of a fairy-tale, even she, the “Shy Di” who met with presidents, dignitaries, diplomats, religious leaders, rock stars and movie legends, was human. And ever so vulnerable. Dead at 36, the assistant kindergarten teacher who became the world’s most photographed woman, had 16 years earlier married Prince Charles, the most world’s most eligible bachelor destined to become the King of England. An estimated 750 million people watched the global television pageant while 600,000 spectators lined the streets of London. Thirteen years her senior, Prince Charles was however, in love with another woman – Camille Parker-Bowles. The married, ever-present Mrs. Parker-Bowles helped Charles – along with the Queen mother – to choose the young virgin from aristocratic blood. But unlike Diana, who devoted herself to being in love, Charles had a different agenda. When asked about loving the then 19-year old he infamously quipped, “whatever that means.” From the onset, Parker-Bowles never relinquished her role as mistress. The marriage, as Diana would famously quote years later, “became a bit crowded.” While the musical scores celebrate Diana’s life, there are no noted villains, just the perpetual angst that comes with any love triangle. The play lyrically depicts Diana’s once promised fairy tale as an existence punctuated with bouts of depression, attempted suicides, eating disorders and her own extra-marital affairs. Even her beloved sons William and Harry could not save the marriage, which ultimately ended in divorce. “Everyone, at some point during their childhood, is exposed to fairy tales – fantastical stories of dashing princes and plucky princesses overcoming curses and creatures to live happily ever after,” said Ashley. “Almost everyone, however grows to learn the difference between fiction and reality.” “Diana” elegantly segues into the Princess’s final chapter. No longer suffocating behind the castle walls, Diana reached out to those in need. Plastering her heart on her sleeve, the compassionate soul coddled infants infected with HIV/AIDS, caressed lepers and journeyed through landmines with amputee victims in Bosnia and Angola. Lady Diana, Princess of Wales, devoted herself to highlighting HIV/AIDS early in its crises when most shunned themselves away from a disease no one understood. Diana’s troubled marriage gave birth to a woman of accomplishment. Hounding paparazzi propelled the beauty into becoming a global phenomenon. Through “Diana,” we lay witness into pieces of her life, loves, charities and her untimely, tragic, death. “Having lived through the relentless media coverage of Diana’s marriage, divorce, death and remembrance, I’ve always been tremendously moved by her to power to stand up to the might of the monarchy,” said Ashley. “The institution survived – and even thrived – but it was undeniably altered by Diana. “Of course, Diana’s fairy tale didn’t end happily ever after. Perhaps that’s why, more than 20 years after her death, our culture remains fascinated by her story.” “Diana” runs through April 14 at the La Jolla Playhouse.
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    Cirque du Soleil’s VOLTA to open in April at Del Mar Fairgrounds
    Mar 23, 2019 | 729 views | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    The stunning costumes of VOLTA have been designed by Zaldy Goco, famous for his work with Lady Gaga, Michael Jackson, Britney Spears, and Gwen Stefany. / Photo by BenoitZ.Leroux
    The stunning costumes of VOLTA have been designed by Zaldy Goco, famous for his work with Lady Gaga, Michael Jackson, Britney Spears, and Gwen Stefany. / Photo by BenoitZ.Leroux
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    Energetic, urban and contemporary, VOLTA is a captivating voyage of discovery that showcases never-before-seen under the Big Top acrobatics in a visually striking world. / Photo by Matt Beard
    Energetic, urban and contemporary, VOLTA is a captivating voyage of discovery that showcases never-before-seen under the Big Top acrobatics in a visually striking world. / Photo by Matt Beard
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    Cirque du Soleil’s VOLTA will be presented under the Big Top at the Del Mar Fairgrounds from April 3 through May 5. The creators of VOLTA drew inspiration from the spirit of adventure that pervades the world of BMX, street sports and acrobatics. Whether they are on a bike, hopping from rooftop to rooftop, or double dutch rope skipping, urban sports enthusiasts constantly challenge themselves and defy convention. Sure to be a San Diego crowd pleaser, a full-blown BMX park is mounted on stage in front of the audience’s very eyes for the breathtaking BMX finale as riders invade the stage to deliver a jaw-dropping, fast and furious performance of nonstop acrobatics on wheels. The riders go up the jump boxes and perform air tricks before landing and leaping off the ramps again, crisscrossing and spinning their bikes in midair in a spirit of brotherhood. The show Energetic, urban and contemporary, VOLTA is a captivating voyage of discovery that showcases never-before-seen under the Big Top acrobatics in a visually striking world. Driven by a stirring melodic score and inspired in part by the adventurous spirit that fuels the culture of street sports, VOLTA is a story of transformation. It is about being true to oneself, fulfilling one’s true potential, and recognizing one’s own power to make it possible. Ultimate freedom comes with self-acceptance, and with the liberation of the judgement of others. The name VOLTA refers to a sudden about-face, a change in emotion or idea often used in poetry. It also speaks to the jolt of energy delivered through the show. BMX & street sports Because of the limited space under the Big Top – the VOLTA stage is exceptionally deep – the six massive ramps used in the breathtaking BMX act are of increasing size and slip one inside another, like Russian dolls, when stowed away. The ramps are made of thick, heavy-duty polycarbonate – a material used to make bulletproof glass – and are fully transparent so as not to block the view of spectators sitting in the front rows, who see riders through the ramp come at them at more than 30 km/h. And the material must be strong and resistant, because a rider landing on a ramp generates a force of 12 Gs: 12 times his weight. The costumes The stunning costumes of VOLTA have been designed by Zaldy Goco, famous for his work with Lady Gaga, Michael Jackson, Britney Spears, Gwen Stefany and for TV show “RuPaul’s Drag Race.” Tickets Tickets may be purchased cirquedusoleil.com/volta. There is also a VIP package – a cocktail reception with open bar and hors d’oeuvres inspired by the show, access to the best seats for greater comfort, complimentary parking and more. Cirque du Soleil VOLTA is Cirque du Soleil’s 41st original production since 1984, and its 18th show presented under the Big Top. The company has brought wonder and delight to more than 190 million spectators in more than 450 cities on six continents. Cirque du Soleil Entertainment Group has close to 4,000 employees, including 1,400 performing artists from close to 60 different countries.
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    Tragedy at Torrey Pines Gliderport as two paragliders die in collision
    by EMILY BLACKWOOD
    Mar 22, 2019 | 217 views | 0 0 comments | 7 7 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    A paraglider floats above Blacks Beach in Torrey Pines. / THOMAS MELVILLE / VILLAGE NEWS
    A paraglider floats above Blacks Beach in Torrey Pines. / THOMAS MELVILLE / VILLAGE NEWS
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    By all accounts, it was a pretty perfect day. The air was good, and there was plenty of space to fly, according to Torrey Pines Gliderport flight director Gabriel Jebb. No one could have imagined that it would be the backdrop for the Gliderport’s first death in more than 10 years, and its first midair collision to cause multiple deaths. It was a tragedy. One that, according to Jebb, "couldn’t have happened to two better guys.” On March 9, Glenn Johnny Peter Bengtsson, 43, of Carlsbad, and Raul Gonzalez Valerio, 61, of Laguna Hills, died after they crashed into each other and fell into a cliff. Both Bengtsson and Valerio were certified pilots who were well aware of rules regarding the distance to keep between each other. Valerio had fallen in love with paragliding after he retired and learned a couple of his buddies were doing it. He finished up his training at Torrey Pines a year ago, where he met Jebb.  “He had this incredible dynamic personality,” Jebb said. “The first day you met him, you liked him.” Valerio was known for being friends with everyone and could be found at Gliderport flying or even just hanging out with the pilots at least four days a week.  Bengtsson worked as a commercial pilot and was passionate about “aviation in any form.” Jebb met him back in January.  “His feeling was that once you started paragliding, flying a jet is like flying a car with more rules,” Jebb said. “Paragliding is about as close to being a bird as you can be." The San Diego Police, the San Diego Fire-Rescue Department, and the Medical Examiner's Office are still investigating. what exactly caused the collision, Jebb said the deaths of their good friends has not only been a tragedy but a wake-up call. Jebb said that as pilots, they try to learn from accidents like this one so that they can do their best to prevent it from happening again. In this case, he wants to encourage paragliders to really develop their situational awareness on things like fluctuation in the wind and how close they are to terrain and other pilots.  “There are inherent risks to the sport, but it’s no more dangerous than driving a car. But it can become incredibly dangerous when you stop paying attention. And unfortunately, I think that’s what happened.” Still, it is a relatively safe sport. According to ABC 10 News San Diego, the paragliding fatality rate is one in 100,000; the same statistic as automobile fatalities in the United States.  It was also reported that the staff at Torrey Pines Gliderport might host a memorial fly-in for Bengtsson and Valerio, but that date has not been set.
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    Senior Gleaners gather surplus food in San Diego to help feed the hungry
    by LUCIA VITI
    Mar 15, 2019 | 37358 views | 0 0 comments | 14 14 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    A crew of Senior Gleaners working the coast including the Cayetano pick in Mission Beach. / Photo by Daryush Bastani
    A crew of Senior Gleaners working the coast including the Cayetano pick in Mission Beach. / Photo by Daryush Bastani
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    Calling all active seniors in need of productivity and vegetable farmers and homeowners with backyards filled with fruit trees. San Diego’s Senior Gleaners are ready, super excited and able to glean surplus produce in an effort to feed the hungry. Celebrating 25 years as a nonprofit organization, this dedicated group of volunteers collects food that would otherwise be wasted. Members glean surplus produce from farms, fields, groves, and backyards. The group also collects damaged or outdated foods and products donated by grocers, food services, and even restaurants throughout San Diego County. Picking occurs almost every Tuesday morning, year-round. Grocery crews are scheduled four mornings a week to grocery stores the include Windmill Farms, Vons, Ralphs, Keils, even Outback Steakhouse. Crew sizes and detailed surplus varies. The coastal communities of La Jolla, Pacific Beach, Ocean Beach and Point Loma are abundant with produce. “With all of the negativity in today's world, gleaning, a tradition established by landowners who set aside portions of their harvested bounty to feed the poor, is positive and productive,” said Monte Turner, Senior Gleaner board president. “We help to feed the hungry, reduce waste and keep retirees active.” According to Turner, the Senior Gleaners collected more than 280,000 pounds of produce and distributed nearly 252 tons of food in 2018. And yet, San Diego continues to waste 500,000 tons of food annually while 500, 000 people live in poverty or are considered food insecure. “While not starving, many San Diegans don’t know where their next meal is coming from,” he said. “We don’t have a hunger problem, we have a food distribution problem. Rather than compost edible food or fill landfills with what becomes harmful methane gas, it makes more sense to support groups like ours who get food to the people who need it.” Turner spoke of the emotional satisfaction that he gets from gleaning. “I love being outside with friends picking fruit appreciated by people who frequent food pantries,” he said. “People often receive canned goods and unsold grocery food items but rarely fresh fruit. And San Diego is fruit country (oranges, tangerines, lemons, grapefruits, avocados apples, and pears are among the County’s produce surplus). “We often pass trees loaded with fruit and within a few weeks, the fruit is unsightly, rotting on the ground, attracting insects and feeding rats,” he continued. “To date, we’ve collected less than 10 percent of what’s available, leaving huge untapped resources.” Turner noted that it’s now standard practice for nationwide grocery chain stores to connect with groups like the Senior Gleaners to ensure that edible food is feeding the hungry, not landfills. “Food organizations like ours are being tapped into after a recently enacted state law that requires cities and counties to reduce the amount of organic, soon to be toxic material, to be dumped into landfills,” he said. Senior Gleaners supply small distribution groups – those not served by large food banks – which includes churches, senior centers, low-income housing units and food pantries. Volunteers are needed for gleaning and transporting at least 300 pounds of produce to Heaven's Windows, a satellite facility of the San Diego Food Bank and Feeding America. There is no minimum time requirement, however all volunteers must be 55 or older. Donors receive detailed receipts to claim tax deductions. The federal Good Samaritan Food Donation Act protects donors from liability for “damages incurred as the result of illness,” as long as the donor has not “acted with negligence or intentional misconduct.” The Senior Gleaners of San Diego County is a certified non-profit organization affiliated with the San Diego County Office of Aging and Independent Services/ Retired and Senior Volunteer Program, a nationwide program that encourages seniors to serve their community. For more information, visit seniorgleanerssdco.org.
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    News
    Volunteers needed for Ocean Beach Street Fair & Chili Cook-Off
    The Ocean Beach MainStreet Association is seeking applicants as volunteers at the 39th annual Ocean Beach Street Fair & Chili Cook-Off Festival, set for Saturday, June 23 from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Vol...
    Published - Wednesday, April 25
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    Ravive Health & Vitality clinic opens in Point Loma
    In a day when obesity is considered a worldwide epidemic, owner and director of Ravive Health & Vitality health clinic, Howard Flamm, is doing his part to make a difference. Seven years ago, Flamm ...
    Published - Wednesday, April 25
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    Sanitation driver in San Diego named best in the nation
    The National Waste & Recycling Association (NWRA) announced on April 24 the winner of the organization’s Driver of the Year Award, naming longtime City of San Diego driver, Roger Bronner, as the na...
    Published - Tuesday, April 24
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    La Perla Cocina Mexicana is a winning combination
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    Published - Tuesday, April 24
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    Bowling alley coming to Ocean Beach
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    Published - Tuesday, April 24
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    Opinion: San Diego loves its Gulls, but improvements could be made
    The San Diego Gulls recently completed their third season at the Valley View Casino Center, failing to make the American Hockey League playoffs for the first time after losing six of their last sev...
    Published - Tuesday, April 24
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    A sad tale for a mama hummingbird
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    Published - Tuesday, April 24
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    Point Loma artist Jon Koehler featured at ArtWalk
    Jon Koehler is a master craftsman of gigantic proportions. The designer, welder and fabricator, creates ginormous steel sculptures. Abstract and free-form patterns that stem from a barrage of “craz...
    Published - Tuesday, April 24
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    After five-year run and a pricey 2016 redesign, The Hake closes doors
    The axiom is that 50 percent of all businesses fail within the first five years. The latest evidence has visited the Village in the form of a troubling development in the neighborhood’s thriving re...
    Published - Monday, April 23
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    SDPD to begin bait bike program in Ocean Beach and Point Loma
    At a press conference at 12:45 p.m. at Veterans Plaza in Ocean Beach on Tuesday, April 24, District 2 Councilmember Lorie Zapf will be joined by San Diego Police Department’s Western Division, will...
    Published - Monday, April 23
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    Point Loma Playhouse to hold 10th anniversary gala
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    Published - Monday, April 23
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    Karl Strauss, Automatic Brewing, and SD Urban Timber release collaboration beer for Earth Day 
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    Published - Monday, April 23
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    Judge denies motion to dismiss Greatrex case
    A judge turned down a request Friday to dismiss the embezzlement case against Cindy Greatrex who is accused of stealing $67,935 from the La Jolla Park & Recreation Inc. Board while she was its pres...
    Published - Monday, April 23
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    Iron Pig Alehouse to hold benefit for Operation Greyhound
    Passion is what gets the staff at Iron Pig Alehouse to come to work every day. While serving delicious food and drinks is part of it, the restaurant takes pride in their involvement with the Pacifi...
    Published - Monday, April 23
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