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    La Jolla news and community briefs
    Oct 20, 2017 | 14167 views | 0 0 comments | 7 7 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    A research vessel launches from Scripps Pier on Oct. 17. / PHOTO BY BLAKE BUNCH
    A research vessel launches from Scripps Pier on Oct. 17. / PHOTO BY BLAKE BUNCH
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    UC San Diego names five athletes to Hall of Fame The University of California San Diego Department of Intercollegiate Athletics inducted four new members into its Hall of Fame during a ceremony Sunday at the Great Hall on campus. The fifth induction class includes Derek Armstrong (men's soccer coach, 1982-2007), Dana Chaiken (softball, 1988-1991), Rosanna Delurgio (swimming and diving, 2002-2005), and Tim Rapp (men's basketball, 1987-1991). "Our Hall of Fame exists to provide a place where we look for, and find, true inspiration," said UC San Diego director of athletics Earl Edwards. "Today, it is our great honor to welcome [the Class of 2017] into the UC San Diego Hall of Fame. They represent for us the very best of what we all can be if we just try. Their achievements speak for themselves, their successes and motivations are clear. " The 2017 inductees span the years of 1982 through 2005. Armstrong is the second coach to become a UC San Diego Hall of Famer. Chaiken is the first softball player to go in, while Delurgio is the fifth swimmer and Rapp is the second basketball standout to be named to the Hall of Fame. The foursome brings the total number of Hall of Fame members to 27. Hemlock Society celebrates 30th anniversary Celebrating its 30th anniversary, the Hemlock Society of San Diego will hold an all-day conference, Achieving a Peaceful Death: What We Have Learned in Thirty Years, on Saturday, Nov. 4, from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Sheraton La Jolla. Since its founding in 1980, the Hemlock Society has always explored other than traditional end-of-life models. Conference attendees will learn all about them: what methods are available in this country and what are being used worldwide. They will also learn about the possible alternatives to living with dementia. Boy Scout Troop 506 open house All boys and girls 10-17 years old are invited to the Boy Scout Troop 506 Open House, held on Oct. 30 at 6:30 p.m. at the La Jolla United Methodist Church, 6063 La Jolla Blvd. Troop 506 is a great place for all boys looking for outdoor adventure, service to others and fellowship. For more information, visit www.lajollatroop506.com or contact scoutmaster, Jacques Naviaux, at jacquesnaviaux@yahoo.com. SD Bar Foundation hosts ‘An Evening in La Jolla’ The San Diego County Bar Foundation’s (SDCBF) 20th annual “An Evening in La Jolla,” the signature fundraising event for the San Diego legal community, has raised $120,000, providing much needed legal resources to foster children and at-risk youth, the sick and disabled, the elderly, immigrants, domestic violence victims, and more. The Sept. 23 event at the Birch Aquarium gathered more than 350 legal and business professionals from the San Diego community. Judges, lawyers and legal supporters socialized while enjoying an array of food stations, a full champagne bar, and a live band. Attendees learned the impactful story and accomplishments of the California Veterans Legal Task Force, one of SDCBF’s Indigent Criminal Defense Fund recipients. To get involved with the San Diego County Bar Foundation, donate or learn more, visit www.sdcbf.org. Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure Susan G. Komen San Diego’s 21st annual Race for the Cure is the county’s largest 5K and 1-mile walk/run. It will be held on Sunday, Nov. 5 at 8 a.m. in Balboa Park. When government-funded programs or private insurance is unable to fulfill the community’s need, Komen San Diego steps in to fill the gaps for breast cancer patients. With the money raised from the Race for the Cure, Komen San Diego is able to cover costs for diagnostic mammograms, biopsies, ultrasounds, research, meal delivery, temporary financial aid, patient navigation, breast health education and advocacy.  Herringbone partners with James Beard House In early October, founding chef Brian Malarkey and the Herringbone culinary team brought the ocean, land, and sea to one of the James Beard Foundation's most notable events – A Beard House Dinner in New York City. In honor of this prestigious event, Herringbone La Jolla will be hosting a special, one-night-only tribute dinner on Wednesday, Oct. 25 at 7 p.m., with a menu featuring the five courses Malarkey and his team served at the New York City event. Each course will be accompanied by a vintage varietal handpicked for each location. For more information, visit www.herringboneeats.com or call 858-459-0221. David Sedaris at UC San Diego ‘ArtPower’ One of America’s preeminent humor writers, David Sedaris, returns to ArtPower presented by UC San Diego on Thursday, Nov. 16, at 8 p.m. An ArtPower fan favorite for many years, best-selling author Sedaris returns with fresh writing and biting social critiques that make him a master of satire. He has recently released two new books: a collection of his diaries titled “Theft by Finding: Diaries (1977–2002)” (May 2017) and “David Sedaris Diaries: A Visual Compendium.” (October 2017). The event will be held at the Balboa Theatre, located at 868 Fourth Ave. in downtown San Diego. Tickets cost $40–55. To order tickets, visit  www.sandiegotheatres.org/david-sedaris.
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    A conversation with world-renowned oceanographer, Walter Munk
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Oct 16, 2017 | 13010 views | 0 0 comments | 16 16 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Walter Munk will turn 100 on Thursday, Oct. 19. / PHOTO CONTRIBUTED
    Walter Munk will turn 100 on Thursday, Oct. 19. / PHOTO CONTRIBUTED
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    Walter Heinrich Munk was born on Oct. 19, 1917. He is a physical oceanographer and professor of geophysics emeritus at Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla. He is one of the world's foremost authorities on winds, waves and other projects. Munk's distinguished list of accomplishments includes: Being the first person to show why one side of the moon always faces the Earth; pioneering research on the relationship between winds and ocean circulation; investigating irregularities in the Earth's rotation and their impacts on the planet; description of ocean wave behavior while investigating ocean tides; and furthering the study of global warming via the relation between changes in ocean temperature, sea level, and the transfer of mass between continental ice and the ocean. Munk's research into tides helped guide the Allies in selecting where and when to land in Normandy on D-Day. On Oct. 18, a day before his centennial birthday, La Jolla Shores boardwalk was renamed Walter Munk Way honoring the esteemed scientist. Known as the “Einstein of the oceans,” Walter Munk has been entertained — and honored — by the Pope and dignitaries worldwide. He's returned the favor, having himself hosted international VIPs like the Dali Lama at his blufftop La Jolla home which he and his first wife, Judith, an architect, built themselves. Not surprisingly, the Munk homestead has an ocean view to die for. “I can't tell you how many times we've watched sunsets in my life,” recounts Walter about the “Munkdom” adding, “I've seen many green flashes in my 70 years here.” Munk has also had a manta ray named for him, which is the topic of a film screened recently at Arclight theaters as part of the International Film Festival titled “Spirit of Discovery.” La Jolla Village News recently caught up with the esteemed oceanographer in an hour-long, sit-down interview at his home office, which features a terracotta warrior given to him by the Chinese. In a Q & A session, Munk talked about his life, his work, global warming and the future of the planet. LJVN: We know a lot of your work today involves research into global warming. Have we passed the “tipping point,” the point of no return past which the Earth's warming cannot be reversed? Munk: We have not passed that. I think there is no question that human beings have caused climate change. LJVN: How do you slow down, reverse, climate change? Munk: We're doing it. A key is to go from fossil fuels to renewable energy. It's an enormous challenge. (Munk, who had enlisted in the Army as a foot soldier during World War II got “pressed” into service in research efforts to combat German submarines, which were taking a heavy total on the allies early in the war.) LJVN: You played a significant role in combatting German submarines in World War II. Munk: We didn't know how to find submarines. I would say today's problem (global warming) is equivalent to the submarine problem. LJVNL: How were subs detected? Munk: By everybody working together internationally to find that sonar (sound) could be used to detect them. LJVN: Are there signs presently of global warming manifesting itself? Munk: We've had lots of hurricanes this year. I don't understand whether or not that's just by chance, or related to climate change. What if it happens again next year? Would we have to do something (evacuating) about the whole East Coast? What do you do, move millions of Americans to Texas? What would be the answer to continuing to have the kind of hurricanes, or worse, that we had this year? Would we need to make part of America uninhabitable? LJVN: Tell us about your research on Arctic ice melt. Munk: The Arctic has both floating ice and land ice on Greenland. The floating ice is melting. It's going to be gone in the summer within a few years. That does not change sea level much. But the reflectivity of ice is much much bigger than that of water. So as you lose sea ice, the land ice will start melting (absorbing sunlight) more quickly. And the land ice on Greenland is equivalent to 9 millimeters (in sea level rise). In (coastal) La Jolla, 9 meters of sea level rise is not an attractive feature. Especially since the (La Jolla Shores) boardwalk is going to be named for me. What's going to happen to the Munk walk? LJVN: Did you always want to be an oceanographer? Munk: My grandfather was a Viennese banker. I was a poor student. I liked to ski. When I was age 15, my parents exiled me to a school in New York. My mother wanted me to be a banker but I hated it. She gave me some money and I bought a car and drove to the West Coast to visit a college. But I was so naïve, I didn't know that you had to apply. I thought you just had to show up (to be accepted). The dean was so amused, he said, “I'll let you stay for a month and take an exam.” For the first time in my life, I studied like mad and I passed the exam. (Later following a love interest down to San Diego, Munk, on the rebound, found a new love — Scripps Institution of Oceanography.) LJVN: What was Scripps like in the early days? Munk: I was the only student. We had 15 people there, including the director and the gardener. Everything was very small, down by the pier. LJVN: How many Scripps' employees today? Munk: 1,500. Isn't that something? LJVN: We understand you're still working every day. Munk: I've retarded, but not retired. I work from my home office and I go to Scripps two or three times a week. LJVN: We'd like to congratulate you on your 100th birthday. Munk: The nicest birthday present I could want, numerous letters from students of mine from all over the world saying I'd done something to help them, has already happened. That's all I could ask for. So I'm very happy. LJVN: What are your plans for the future? Munk: I've got a paper I'd like to finish, that I've been working on for the last 50 years off and on, about how the wind drives the ocean and the Gulf Stream. That's what I'm going to do. LJVN: To what do you attribute your success? Munk: I would never have had the career I've had without Judith and my second wife, Mary Coakley Munk. They both played such a significant part in my career, helping me getting work done. LJVN: What's it like to be one of the most prominent oceanographers on the planet? Munk: An oceanographer is just a big word for being a plumber.
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    La Jolla news and community briefs
    Oct 08, 2017 | 23085 views | 0 0 comments | 27 27 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    A view of La Jolla from Torrey Pines State Park. / PHOTO BY BLAKE BUNCH
    A view of La Jolla from Torrey Pines State Park. / PHOTO BY BLAKE BUNCH
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    Celebrate the Creeps of the Deep at Birch Aquarium Meet some of the creeps of the deep and get hands-on with Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego science at the eighteenth-annual Haunted Aquarium: Sea Monster Mash. Families are invited to dive into the spooky, slimy side of ocean science and enjoy a Halloween-themed evening of music, crafts, and close encounters with underwater creatures. On October 20 and 21, from 6 to 9 p.m., guests will experience eerie and unusual organisms from the Scripps Oceanographic Collections, see a super-sized squid dissection, and create their own seaweed slime to take home. Meet Scripps Oceanography scientists studying ocean creatures big and small and get an insider's look into what it takes to study different creatures of the deep. Inspired by the Infinity Cube, guests will make unique glowing crafts and learn more about bioluminescence from Scripps Oceanography experts.  Haunted Aquarium is a fun and educational Halloween celebration. Costumes are encouraged, especially if they have an ocean science theme. Billy Lee and the Swamp Critters will return for music and dancing, and Splash! Café by The French Gourmet will be open for ghoulish treats. Birch Aquarium is also calling on the community to “Reduce, Reuse, Repumpkin” and create spooktacular pumpkins out of recycled plastic containers. The plastic pumpkins can be made of any clean, reused plastic container and should be submitted to Birch Aquarium for a coupon to the Gift Shop. The Plastic Pumpkin Patch will be on display for Haunted Aquarium. Please visit the website for more details. Haunted Aquarium often sells out, so purchasing early is encouraged. Discounted presale tickets are available for $18.50 for the general public, $13.50 for Birch Aquarium members. Tickets will be available at the door for $20. Children ages 2 and under are free, and children under 16 must be accompanied by a paid adult. General admission tickets cannot be used for Haunted Aquarium. Annual memberships are also available. For more information or to purchase tickets, visit aquarium.ucsd.edu or call 858-534-FISH. Congregational Church of La Jolla welcomes Reverend Tim Seery as new spiritual leader The Montana native is settling into his new post. He will preside over his first official service as the congregation's new pastor Sunday, October 15th, when the church welcomes the community to its annual Blessing of the Animals celebration. A recent graduate of Harvard Divinity School, where he earned his Masters of Divinity (M.Div.), Reverend Seery holds a Bachelor's Degree in Comparative Religion from Harvard University.  He served as an Assistant Minister to two churches in the Boston area and most recently as a Chaplain at an assisted living residence.  His call to ministry came early in  life; Reverend Seery has been preaching since his childhood pastor first invited him to at age 15.  The reverend’s passions in ministry include a rich worship life, preaching, pastoral care, and working to enhance life together as community. A lifelong student of history, Reverend Seery is intrigued by Congregational Church of La Jolla's rich heritage, and inspired by its distinction as the oldest faith community in the La Jolla. Seery enjoys collecting antiquarian books, reading about and appreciating art and its history, and traveling through Asia and South America. To date, he has visited 35 countries and counting.  He has discovered that stretching himself to really experience another culture and to see how real people live across the world is probably the most formative part of his faith development and his experience of the Divine. Reverend Seery hopes that he can inspire his congregation to never quit learning, discovering, exploring and “putting themselves out there” to connect with others, create formative memories, and to go deeper with God.  Reverend Seery is inspired by open and affirming churches that proclaim a bold message of inclusion and radical love—much like Congregational Church of La Jolla. He is excited to make San Diego his new home, becoming reacquainted with the West Coast and pursuing his ministry in the relaxed and welcoming community of La Jolla. Reverend Seery (who likes to be called Tim) would be happy to discuss his hopes and aspirations for guiding Congregational Church of La Jolla into the formative years of its second century as an open and affirming faith community.  Man crushed by garbage truck on Herschel Ave. On Tuesday, Oct. 3, authorities released the name of a 22-year-old sanitation worker who was killed when an unoccupied trash truck rolled into him and pinned him against a wall in a La Jolla alley. David Strobridge of San Diego was moving a garbage bin in the access road off the 7600 block of Herschel Avenue when his work vehicle coasted forward and hit him shortly before 11 a.m. Monday, according to police and the county Medical Examiner's Office. Emergency crews freed Strobridge, and medics took him to Scripps Memorial Hospital in La Jolla, where he was pronounced dead. The state Division of Occupational Safety and Health, or Cal/OSHA, was called in to investigate the fatality, as is standard in serious work-related accidents. “Cal/OSHA was notified yesterday afternoon of a fatality incident involving a truck driver for Tayman Industries. The worker had exited the front-loading refuse truck without properly setting the brake and was pinched between the wall and the truck when the truck began to move forward. Tayman Industries is a private waste collection company and there is no affiliation with city garbage collection known or suspected at this time in relation to this incident.” Prince Albert II of Monaco to join Walter Munk 100th birthday celebration  On Oct. 26 at 11:30 a.m., UC San Diego will welcome His Serene Highness (H.S.H.) Prince Albert II of Monaco to campus for a Centennial Conversation with Walter Munk at the Robert Paine Scripps Forum for Science, Society and the Environment at Scripps Oceanography. The invitation-only event with H.S.H. Prince Albert II and Munk will be a dialogue on exploring the seas and the importance of oceanographic research. Often called the world’s greatest living oceanographer, Munk is known for inventing the science of wave forecasting with former Scripps director Harald Sverdrup, which helped Allied troops plan amphibious invasions. In 1943, Munk created the first wave prediction course and trained American military meteorologists at Scripps Oceanography, including those who would later predict conditions for World War II D-Day landings in Normandy. Munk also pioneered tide prediction, and many aspects of ocean acoustics, ocean circulation, and deep-sea tides. Recently, he has explored the relationship between changes in ocean temperature, sea level, and the ocean between ice sheets and the seafloor. Known for his endless curiosity, Munk still conducts research today. “We are honored to host His Serene Highness Prince Albert II at UC San Diego and thankful that he will join us in lauding Walter Munk as we celebrate his centennial birthday,” said UC San Diego Chancellor Pradeep K. Khosla. “The Principality of Monaco has a long history of oceanographic research and conservation. This commitment to scientific discovery and conservation are values we share at UC San Diego, and have been lifelong attributes of Walter Munk.”
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    Children's Pool Lifeguard Tower sees major issues, undergoes audit
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Oct 06, 2017 | 7394 views | 0 0 comments | 28 28 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Although the Children’s Pool Lifeguard Tower has experienced infrastructure difficulties, workers made sure to fly the flag at half-mast in honor of the victims of the tragic mass shooting in Las Vegas. / PHOTO BY BLAKE BUNCH
    Although the Children’s Pool Lifeguard Tower has experienced infrastructure difficulties, workers made sure to fly the flag at half-mast in honor of the victims of the tragic mass shooting in Las Vegas. / PHOTO BY BLAKE BUNCH
    slideshow
    Serious cost overruns and infrastructure maladies, including plumbing back-ups and alleged contamination by sewer gases, are among the problems afflicting Children's Pool Lifeguard Tower in La Jolla. One of three lifeguard towers built in La Jolla during the past decade, construction on the Children's Pool Tower began in early 2013. It was opened June 27.  Almost immediately, the tower's public restrooms began backing up and leaking into lifeguard showers and locker rooms, temporarily closing public toilets and forcing lifeguards to retreat into a temporary trailer. The project went through three seal moratoriums including an unexpected delay when seagulls were found nesting on the job site, preventing work resuming until the birds left.  And It didn't help that the old dilapidated tower it replaced, constructed in the '60s over an abandoned sewer pump station, was condemned by the health department as a threat before being razed in fall 2013. San Diego Lifeguard Union chief Ed Harris said many of the problems plaguing the site from the original tower linger — like the smell of sewer gas. And that, Harris said, doesn't factor in construction flaws, or the fact the project has far exceeded budget. “From a taxpayer's point of view, it's a tragedy,” claimed Harris. “It's more than a million dollars over budget.” The project was scheduled to be completed in 220 working days. It ended up taking three years to complete. The total estimated project cost of the Children's Pool Lifeguard Tower as of Jan. 27, was $4,324,773, 21 percent more than the projected budget of $3,591,481, city officials said. Those figures were taken from a Sept. 19 city audit report of the project contractor, Stronghold Engineering Inc. of Riverside. The city audit concluded lifeguard tower project costs, and the possibility for delays were underestimated characterizing early cost projections as “overly optimistic.” "The original Stronghold Engineering authorized contract amount was $2,707,127 with a project duration of 220 working days," said the audit." Over the life of the contract, change orders and contingency fund authorizations were used to charge more than $575,000 and add 281 working days to the Stronghold Engineering contract." Auditors pointed out the city “failed to anticipate delays caused by the harbor seal colony nearby. Disturbing or harassing the marine mammals is forbidden by federal law, especially during the marine mammal's Dec. 15-May 15 pupping season. Cost overruns were just one snafu, said Harris, who noted an Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) report alleging tower sewer gas contamination was filed. “Whenever you walk into the installation, you smell sewer gases from feces,” Harris said, adding, “[Union] told them to look into that sewer gas smell a year ago.” Harris added a subsequent inquiry into the source of the alleged smell revealed “the forced air unit was not sealed. That's been moving sewer gases and spreading them throughout the entire tower.” San Diego Fire-Rescue, in a letter to OSHA dated May 30 and signed by David Picone, battalion chief, health and safety officer, claims the problems outlined in the OSHA complaint, including tower smells, have been addressed and mitigated. “As part of the design of the building, the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) unit was placed in the same room as the sewage collection pit for the public restroom (allowed by building codes). Both the sewage and HVAC systems are intended to be independently sealed to prevent cross-contamination. Fire-Rescue took immediate and decisive action to investigate the claim. The health and safety of our workforce is a priority.” SDFR said the following mitigation steps were taken: • The city inspected the room where the sewage collection pit and HVAC are located and noticed the odor. •  The city tested the HVAC system drawing air fromm the room and circulating it throughout the tower. • The city contacted San Diego County Health and scheduled a test of the station's air quality to determine if there were any harmful contaminants. •  The HVAC was turned off with a “lock out tag out” process. •  A subsequent air-quality test of the facility detected no contaminants. • The city contacted the general contractor to determine the needed repairs to seal the sewage collection pit and seal the HVAC system. Audit details According to the audit of the La Jolla Children's Pool Lifeguard Station by the Office of the City Auditor, several issues led to cost increases and lengthy timelines for completion of Children's Pool Lifeguard Tower. The auditor's report determined “some of these issues could have been identified earlier in the design process and may have reduced the project's cost and duration.” The city said the lifeguard tower project was audited “Due to concerns over the construction of the lifeguard station, its total cost exceeding $4.3 million and that it took three years to complete. We recommend that Public Works, in conjunction with the asset-owning departments, should conduct scoping/partnering meetings early in the process to discuss lifeguard station program needs, special scope requests, and the impacts of codes and regulations on the project’s overall cost and schedule.  “Additionally, we recommend that Public Works should implement strict considerations for product and material applications applicable to the lifeguard station environmental and occupant requirements. Finally, we recommend that for facilities located in harsh environments such as a marine environment, Public Works should have a supplemental maintenance plan in place for high-risk materials and components.” The audit noted the Children's Pool project was complicated by construction being limited to 6 1/2 months out of the year due to the Dec. 15 to May 15 seal pupping season at the pool. The report also pointed out Public Works used a non-traditional method, design-build, for this project. Design-build is a delivery system used in construction to deliver a project by contracting with a single entity. This is used to minimize risks for the project owner and reduce the project's timeline by overlapping the design and construction phases of the project. Auditors concluded that “Costs exceeding the original contract amount of $2,707,127 was not due to a poorly bid or executed contract, but rather due to not factoring in design requests and upgrades well into the construction phase. Changes in design and special requests not only added to the cost but also prolonged the completion date."
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    Westfield breaks ground on new UTC development
    Oct 03, 2017 | 10434 views | 0 0 comments | 32 32 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    A rendering of the Westfield development. / PHOTO CONTRIBUTED
    A rendering of the Westfield development. / PHOTO CONTRIBUTED
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    Westfield has broken ground on construction of a new 23-story, upscale residential tower located on UTC’s southwest corner at the intersection of Nobel Drive and Lombard Place. Slated to open to residents in 2019, the tower will encompass 300 modern apartment homes that will be among the best appointed in the entire San Diego region. Each of the studios, one- bedroom, two-bedroom, and three-bedroom units will feature sleek interior design, high-end finishes, and elegant architectural motifs. Views from the residences will provide panoramas of the Pacific Ocean, La Jolla, and San Diego’s mountains. The tower will also include best-in-class amenities such as: - A beautifully landscaped one-half acre pool and amenity deck with junior Olympic- size pool and relaxing spa, outdoor kitchens, grills, cabanas, lounges, and fire pits. - Resort-inspired “sky lounge” on the 23rd floor with 360-degree views of the ocean and surrounding landscapes. The lounge offers private dining, top-shelf bar, and outdoor decks with fire tables. - A clubroom on the 3rd floor featuring indoor/outdoor entertaining space, access to outdoor and catering kitchens, as well as a media room, sports lounge, billiards and more. - Fitness center with outdoor fitness deck, yoga and spin classes, steam rooms, and spa. - Library, private workspace and conference room facilities equipped with top of the line audio/visual and IT infrastructure. They will also offer 24/7 concierge services along with private underground parking. "Being able to offer the chance to live in close proximity to great shopping, dining, entertainment, health and fitness, and workspaces, is very exciting,” said John Alderson, Westfield’s vice president of development in San Diego. “Westfield has been a dedicated champion of the UTC neighborhood for the past 40 years, and breaking ground on the new residential tower is an important milestone and the next step in our chapter as we continue to showcase the community. We’re looking forward to welcoming new residents to the neighborhood." The beginning of construction on the tower comes as the culmination of a five-year planning effort undertaken between Westfield and Greystar, the largest operator of apartments in the United States. In addition to serving as development and construction advisors on the project, Greystar will professionally manage the community once the tower opens to residents. Future residents of the tower will have access to all of the dining, shopping and other amenities available at Westfield UTC, which will complete the next phase of its renovation this fall. The property’s resort-inspired transformation includes the opening of a new two-level Nordstrom alongside on-trend fashion brands making their debut in the San Diego market, as well as exceptional new restaurants such as Din Tai Fung, Javier’s, The Winery Restaurant & Wine Bar La Jolla, Larsen’s Steakhouse, Great Maple, Smokeyard BBQ and Chop Shop, Napizza, Shake Shack, and True Food Kitchen. The residential tower and shopping center will also provide close proximity to mass transit, as in the future UTC will be home to a regional transit station for the new San Diego trolley line connecting Downtown San Diego with the La Jolla area. The residential development at UTC is Westfield’s first such project in the U.S. Westfield is examining opportunities to create 8,000 homes on land it currently owns across its global portfolio and, in addition to the commencement of construction at UTC in 2018, it also anticipates beginning work on a 1,200 apartment project at Stratford City in the U.K.
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    Published - Saturday, March 21
    full story
    Drugs, illness mark push to combat homelessness, town council told
    The majority of homeless suffer from drug/alcohol dependency, as many as 40 percent are considered mentally ill and a push is on to eradicate homelessness among military veterans. La Jolla Town Cou...
    Published - Friday, March 20
    full story
    Ocean Beach Woman’s Club to hold rummage sale
    You can start your spring cleaning by supporting a great cause, the Ocean Beach Woman’s Club’s annual rummage sale on Saturday, March 21 from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at 2160 Bacon St. The club is acceptin...
    Published - Thursday, March 19
    full story
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