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    Citywide hepatitis A data released
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Oct 26, 2017 | 30504 views | 0 0 comments | 17 17 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    This graph shows the number of hepatitis A cases by ZIP code.
    This graph shows the number of hepatitis A cases by ZIP code.
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    Since November 2016, when a countywide hepatitis A outbreak was first detected, 507 people have been infected, 19 (3.7 percent) have died, and more than 80,000 others have been vaccinated, county health authorities said. Hepatitis A is a liver infection caused by the hepatitis A virus, which is highly contagious. It can cause liver disease, lasting a few weeks to a serious illness lasting months. In some cases, it can be fatal. Contamination can occur when persons infected with hepatitis a do not wash their hands properly after going to the bathroom, then touch other objects or food items. Hepatitis A virus does not always cause symptoms. Some with the virus have no symptoms — fever, fatigue, nausea, loss of appetite, yellowing of the eyes (jaundice), stomach pain, vomiting, dark urine, pale stools and diarrhea. Adults are more likely to have symptoms than children. Additionally, county health reported roughly two-thirds of the victims have been homeless and/or illicit drug users. That makes the task of combatting the disease a real challenge, said Dr. Wilma Wooten, public health officer for the County of San Diego. “It's (homeless/drug abusers) a difficult-to-reach population,” she said. “So we've had to creatively go where they are (on the street) because these people typically don't go to health clinics. We've put out teams of public health nurses and law enforcement homeless outreach officers to help us vaccinate those people.” The ongoing hepatitis outbreak was unexpected. “Typically, every month we have two to three cases of hepatitis A that is travel-related, associated with someone who has gone to a country where there is a high prevalence of the disease where they can get exposed to it, and then bring it back with them,” said Wooten noting, “It (hepatitis) has a long incubation period — 15 to 50 days.” Wooten said there was a spike in hepatitis A cases starting this March, which prompted her to declare a local public health emergency. And, because infections are most common among the homeless who often have no access to sanitary facilities, the county’s efforts began turning toward installing hand washing stations and doing street cleaning in early summer. One theory advanced to explain the present hepatitis outbreak, is that California's discontinuation of single-use plastic bags has helped spread the disease. Many people have discounted the plastic-bag theory, but not Wooten. “Yes, absolutely, we know people use the bags for that (defecation),” she said. “We know people don’t have bathrooms and they can put bags in cans and buckets and maintain good hygiene. That’s why we put plastic bags in the hygiene kits we’re handing out. That’s what we expect people will use them for.” The San Diego County Public Health Officer strongly recommends the following groups be vaccinated with the hepatitis A vaccine: People who are homeless. Users of illegal drugs. Men who have sex with men. People with chronic liver disease, such as cirrhosis, hepatitis B, or hepatitis C. People who work with, provide services to or clean up after the homeless and/or illegal drug users Food handlers who have adult clients. Food handlers are not at increased risk, but if infected can impact a large number of people. People with clotting factor disorders. People who conduct laboratory research with the virus. Travelers to countries where hepatitis A is common. People in close personal contact with adopted children from countries where hepatitis A is common. Wooten said the county has employed a three-pronged approach to addressing the hepatitis outbreak: vaccination, sanitation, and education. “As of today, we've vaccinated almost 84,000 individuals since we identified the outbreak in March,” she said adding, “We've also been installing hand-sanitizing stations throughout the city and county, as well as cleaning and bleaching the sidewalks, using the same vendor as the city of Los Angeles, which has more homeless than San Diego, but has not had a hepatitis outbreak. We also have introduced a public education campaign with posters on trolleys.”
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    SeaWorld San Diego transitions to 'Orca Encounter'
    Jan 18, 2017 | 92523 views | 2 2 comments | 186 186 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    SeaWorld's new 'Orca Encounter' will focus more on how these predators exist in the wild. Photo provided by SeaWorld.
    SeaWorld's new 'Orca Encounter' will focus more on how these predators exist in the wild. Photo provided by SeaWorld.
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    As announced in March 2016, SeaWorld is transitioning from theatrical orca shows to a more educational presentation reflecting more natural behaviors of the whales. The first of these “live documentary”-style presentations, called Orca Encounter, will debut at SeaWorld San Diego this summer. SeaWorld Orlando and SeaWorld San Antonio will follow by 2019. The final "One Ocean Shamu" show was conducted at SeaWorld San Diego on Sunday, Jan. 8. Their interim educational orca presentation called a “Killer Whale Presentation” started on Monday, Jan. 9. They have set up temporary seating (bleachers) around the orca underwater viewing area pool and will provide our guests this educational presentation while the new Orca Encounter backdrop is constructed at the main pool. Guests to SeaWorld San Diego will continue to experience live orca presentations, as they make preparations for the new education-based Orca Encounter to debut this summer. Guests will learn how killer whales behave in the wild, how they move, hunt and navigate, what they eat and even how they communicate. "Orca Encounter" will not only help guests gain a deeper appreciation and respect for the orcas, but will leave them with a new sense of determination and purpose to help preserve the future of these majestic animals. This new presentation will also look at broader themes such as research, rescue, conservation, habitats and distribution, husbandry and care, and social structures.  This will inspire as well as educate guests about the majesty of these complex animals and reinforce the company’s commitment to provide educational experiences with the park’s resident Orcas. 
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    Kate-Lyn Jones
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    January 18, 2017
    I found a video on YouTube called "Tilikum Died - SeaWorld Executives EXPOSED: The Killing of Tilikum Blackfish Killer Whale Dies " made by Bright Insight.

    It shows that Joel Many, who came from the general motors Saturn and Saab divisions, has a base pay of $1million, but because SeaWorld is a publicly traded company, made 11.3 MILLION DOLLARS last year!

    And it's not just him, Jack Roddy the chief of human resources who came from Starbucks, Peter J. Crage the chief financial officer from Extended Stay America (a hotel chain), Anthony Esparza the Chief Creative Officer who came from a design firm and other entertainment parks, are all MILLIONAIRES! All of the corporate executives, who left Tilikum to die in that tank, make the decisions in SeaWorld and all of their other parks! Their not marine biologists, they never were, what they are focused on is making money. So who would you rather believe? Experts who have spent most of their lives studying wild Orcas from birth to death, or just a bunch of people that want to solely make money from animal abuse and probably know next to NOTHING about these animals?

    Please share Bright Insights video, more people need to know about this. He might also do a video on Lolita and Seaquarium soon.
    Jeff Monroe
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    May 20, 2017
    It's okay to be a millionaire. Disney makes millions because they entertain millions. Sea World is no different, but they also educate and save thousands of animals. We can learn from the captive ones so that we can help the wild ones. Just so you know, PETA has killed more animals than Sea World has saved. Google it. https://seaworldcares.com/2015/04/twenty-five-thousand-rescues/ https://www.petakillsanimals.com
    Mission Beach seawall turns 91 with a facelift
    by LAINIE FRASER
    May 30, 2016 | 26940 views | 0 0 comments | 29 29 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Memorial Day crowds have a new seawall to sit on in Mission Beach. / Photo by Anna Jensen
    Memorial Day crowds have a new seawall to sit on in Mission Beach. / Photo by Anna Jensen
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    Mayor Kevin Faulconer officially reopened Mission Beach seawall and boardwalk Thursday, May 26 continuing his pledge to invest nearly half a billion dollars this year into rebuilding and improving neighborhoods. The newly constructed walkway, splash wall and seawall took eight months and $4.9 million to complete. According to Faulconer, this is only the first step in a long-term project to rebuild Mission Beach. “Projects like this are how we are rebuilding for a better future across the city,” Faulconer said. On May 28 the Mission Beach boardwalk will turn 91 years old and District 2 Councilwoman Lorie Zapf said she could not think of a better birthday present than the completion of the project just in time for Memorial Day weekend. “It is beautiful the way it turned out and we couldn’t be happier that it is officially complete for Memorial Day weekend and the busy summer season,” Zapf said. According to Craig Gustafson, spokesman for the mayor, the walkway was designed to emulate the look and feel of the original boardwalk. Even the new energy efficient light posts are replicas from those on the original 1925 boardwalk. A major change to the walkways is that they no longer include a step down to the beach creating a fully flat surface with ADA access to the sand stone, something that was lacking in the previous boardwalk design. Construction took roughly eight months and residents who lived through the live construction are thankful the contractors made their deadline. “We want to thank the community because this took a village,” Mission Beach Precise Planning Board member Mary Saska said. “We know you stuck with us and for that we are grateful.” Saska called the project a complete accomplishment for Mission Beach and the entire city. “Back when I was a councilmember,” Faulconer said. “I vowed to stop doing emergency patches and once and for all fix this seawall. It is remarkable how it turned out but we are not stopping here.” Faulconer plans to gather funding and complete a renovation of the remainder of the San Diego beaches.  
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    San Diego history: Coliseum Athletic Club tells a story of a bygone era of fight clubs
    by Johnny McDonald
    Jan 06, 2012 | 443977 views | 2 2 comments | 48 48 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    The Coliseum Athletic Club was located at 15th and E streets. Courtesy photo. Illustration by Kendra Hartmann
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    The impressions of old ticket windows can be seen along the wall at 15th and E streets, once the home of San Diego’s Friday night fights. Boxing’s future elite performed in the smoke-filled Coliseum Athletic Club. It was a gathering place for San Diego’s leading citizens, gamblers and occasional visits by Hollywood celebrities, stopping off en route to a weekend of horse racing at Agua Caliente. They didn’t seem to mind that the old metal and wood flip-down chairs were in constant need of repair. As long as two men were willing to pound away for four to 10 rounds of boxing, they were satisfied. The symmetrically shaped 3,521-seat arena sprang up in 1924 when professional boxing and wrestling were legalized in California. Around part of the perimeter were “cheap seat” bleachers, called the gallery. The Coliseum became one of Southland’s three major boxing marquees, along with the Hollywood Legion Stadium and South Los Angeles’ Olympic Auditorium. The scene inside the old clubs was like nothing that can be found today. The raucous atmosphere where fighters exited a cramped dressing room and walked down an isle to the ring is missing from today’s matches staged in nightclubs, hotels or casinos. Inside, mystic sounds might echo the flourishing days of the 1920s and 1930s. The tiny dressing room became the headquarters and a springboard for future world champions Jimmy McLarnin, Tommy Loughran, Henry Armstrong, Ceferino Garcia and Jimmy Braddock. In later years, there would be Archie Moore and Ken Norton. Fans would congregate around a concession stand outside the arena before the fights and during intermission. The management finally caved, removing some bleachers and building a concession stand inside, which almost became the club’s undoing when an unattended stove was responsible for a fire in 1938 that destroyed the interior. Fortunately, the solid walls held firm. The 22-year-old Moore arrived from St. Louis the next day, scheduled to fight in the following week’s main event. Locals found him lodging and a watchman’s job until the club’s interior was rebuilt. The ageless wonder, who fought until he was 49, had a Coliseum record of 22 victories (15 knockouts), four losses and two draws, made San Diego his home until he died in 1998. The place struggled in the 1950s and 1960s when crowds dropped off. Finally, unable to recover from the losses, its doors closed on Aug. 1, 1974. While 1974 nationally had been a good year for boxing, the club was not so lucky: financial losses reached $50,000. The original owners, Frank Higgins and Tom Landis, operated the place until promoter Linn Platner took over from 1925 until 1943. The trio of Hugh Nichols — a Hollywood wrestler — Grady Skelton and Travis Hatfield made the most of it through the war years. “We ran around 50 shows a year and probably had between 10 to 12 sellouts when we had to turn people away,” Platner once said. “And we had some great fighters. They were looking for work, we were looking for talent.” The glamour long gone, the Coliseum today is just another bland section of a huge warehouse, the interior gutted of chairs, boxing ring and dressing room. Nothing but the outside impressions of the ticket windows — remnants of a forgotten era — remain. In its heyday, however, the Coliseum saw no shortage of big names, both in the ring and in the bleachers. Curley Morgan, the ring announcer from 1927 until the 1950s, startled a few ringsiders one night. “Ladies and gentlemen,” he opened. “I’d like to introduce you to Al Capone.” The gangster stood up and took a bow. Yes, everyone came to the Coliseum.
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    Robert M Harding Jr.
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    April 15, 2017
    I recently helped Helix Mechanical on April 14th 2017, and I love history, and when Craig the foreman of job explained to me what it was, I WAS FLOORED !!! in the late 1960s my Dad would drag me willingly to the Friday night fights !!!! Many times i sat with the lights down dark with just the arena lights on, smoke filled atmosphere sitting up in the bleachers looking down. The great memories of my late Dad (who loved boxing) I can recall him pointing out Jerry Quarry, a heavyweight n those days. Cant remember if he was in the crowd or he fought. (can someone look that up 68-69) Dad always pointed out famous people to me that sat near the ring in the pit. I got to walk around on the concrete walkway again this day, just like I used to when holding my dads hand at 6 years old. WE SHOULD HISTORICALLY save some of this. Can they incorporate it in the next business. What a great theme for a night spot.

    Marcus A. Ojeda
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    October 22, 2017
    My Father took me to the fights to when I was a little guy.

    These are some great memories.

    I can remember when the announcer would introduce fighters that were in the audience before the main event. Kenny Norton was introduced and also the big villain Jack O'halloran, who gave Norton a kick in the rear as he was leaving the ring. The crowd booed him like crazy! There was this big fight with Mike Quarry and another guy who's name I can't remember, Quarry who was supposed to go on to fight Michael Spinks, (Leon's brother) was KOd with a single shot to the head. The crowd exploded! It would get so loud in there! People stomping there feet and hands on those hollow bleachers. Coins and dollar bills thrown in the ring for great fights, lame fights got boo's and beer thrown in the ring. There was fighter who was called "Windmill White" who would always jeer on the crowd as they booed him. He was a tall light heavy weight and would enter the ring by stepping over the top rope and hit his opponents from behind his back. He was always entertaining to say the least.

    Then there was Irish Spud Murphy, in high school fighting main events. He was awarded fight of the year in 1978 against a Mexican fighter named Erik.

    I saw another artical stating his opponent was

    named Sammy Meza. I remember the fighter being named Erik. Spud fought out of gym Boxing Club of America which was located in East San Diego run by his father Mr Murphy. Gym was sponsored the late Dr. Michael Dean. Other fighters out of The Boxing Club of America that I can remember were Steve Delgado, Micah True and Mike "the animal" something.

    Spud went to my wedding in 1979.

    I was very sorry to hear of his passing in 1989.

    He was a good guy..

    Getting back to the coliseum, Art Gonzalez took me to a wrestling match, I remember a guy named Farmer John, he came out in overalls. This was probably around 1968. Later in the 70's I remember there be being a big poster hanging on the wall by the concession stand of Andre the Giant.
    Photo gallery: San Diego rings in the new year with style
    by Kai Oliver-Kurtin
    Jan 06, 2012 | 3136 views | 0 0 comments | 39 39 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Vin de Syrah held a New Year’s Eve masquerade ball, providing each guest a mask to embrace the theme. A DJ and burlesque-style singing trio delivered entertainment, while guests enjoyed tastes of some of the wine bar’s top champagnes served with food pairings. Courtesy photo. Illustration by Kendra Hartmann
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