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    La Jolla news and community briefs
    Feb 11, 2018 | 16480 views | 0 0 comments | 9 9 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    While it may seem as though these recent lunar phenomena have become commonplace, the ‘Super Blue Blood Moon,’ as dubbed by NASA, on Jan. 31 provided contrasting hues to a crystal clear La Jolla evening. The occurrence was actually a combination of a Blue Moon, super moon and total lunar eclipse, and will not occur again until Jan. 31, 2037. / DON BALCH/VILLAGE NEWS
    While it may seem as though these recent lunar phenomena have become commonplace, the ‘Super Blue Blood Moon,’ as dubbed by NASA, on Jan. 31 provided contrasting hues to a crystal clear La Jolla evening. The occurrence was actually a combination of a Blue Moon, super moon and total lunar eclipse, and will not occur again until Jan. 31, 2037. / DON BALCH/VILLAGE NEWS
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    Ways & Means Oyster House to add La Jolla to its worldscape Ways & Means Oyster House, a Huntington Beach venue planning expansions into North Africa, Asia and the Middle East, will open on a spring date to be announced at 1251 Prospect, former home of Alfonso’s of La Jolla. Alfonso’s relocated to Solana Beach in 2017. The La Jolla location will have the same menu as its Huntington Beach and Tigard, Ore. properties, including freshly shucked oysters and grilled oysters with toppings. It will also include a selection of small plates featuring crab cake sliders, fish tacos, bacon-wrapped shrimp and lobster deviled eggs. Daily specials will also be for sale. Ways & Means has an extensive bar program, featuring private label wines and beer. Every month, two wines will be available for off-site sales through the company website (wmoysters.com) and pick-up. Ways & Means will serve lunch and dinner every day, along with a weekend brunch and a weekday afternoon happy hour. Padres Pedal the Cause provides $2.4M for cancer research Padres Pedal the Cause has donated more than $2.4 million to support cancer studies at the Salk Institute, Rady Children’s Hospital, Moores Cancer Center at UC San Diego Health and Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute. The check was presented to representatives from the four organizations on January 24 and was the largest donation ever made by the grassroots organization. Hundreds of cyclists participated in the fifth annual Pedal the Cause on Nov. 11 and 12 at Petco Park. The Salk Institute team featured 18 riders and raised nearly $25,000. Proceeds from the event support innovative cancer projects with a major emphasis on collaborative, translational research that offers a clear path to clinical trials.  “Funding from Padres Pedal the Cause is already having a big impact on our ability to understand cancer and exploit its vulnerabilities,” says Reuben Shaw, who directs the Salk Institute Cancer Center. “These resources mean cancer researchers at Salk collaborate with clinicians and researchers at UC San Diego Moores on new therapies and new insights to develop treatments of the future to root out this horrific disease.”  For the past five years, Salk has been a major partner with Pedal the Cause, on both the fundraising and research sides of the equation. “We’re fortunate to have such a strong relationship with the Salk Institute," says Pedal the Cause executive director Anne Marchand. “In addition to the work they do every day in the lab to advance cancer research in San Diego, they lead by example in supporting Padres Pedal with a dedicated team of riders and volunteers. We look forward to continuing to partner with Team Salk for years to come.” For researchers at Salk, and around San Diego's life sciences hub, the Torrey Pines mesa, this funding will support ongoing efforts to illuminate the basic biology that drives cancer and translate those findings into new therapies. To date, Padres Pedal the Cause has raised more than $7 million to fund 31 cancer research projects. One of these is Salk Assistant Professor Graham McVicker’s work on acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the most common childhood cancer. “The research grant has helped my lab and the Dixon lab at the Salk Institute catalyze a new collaborative project to study pediatric leukemia with Dennis Kuo at Rady Children’s Hospital,” says McVicker. “This is our first time working on a project together, and we are excited about the potential to make new discoveries.” Sweetfin Poké to open at Westfield UTC Founded in 2015 by fraternity brothers Seth Cohen and Brett Nestadt, Sweetfin Poké is one of LA’s most popular poke shops with seven locations now open throughout the city. This chef-driven, California inspired concept prides itself in its “Pole to Bowl” philosophy, sourcing only the highest-quality and most sustainable raw fish they can find while still maintaining a reasonable price point. Not to mention, former Top Chef contestant Dakota Weiss is its founding chef and partner. This is their first endeavor outside fo L.A. with plans to continue growing in San Diego. Their second location will be in Del Mar at the One Paseo development. The Sweetfin team is on a clear trajectory for growth with Chef Dakota on track to be one of the most commercially successful women-owned restauranteurs in Southern California with six Sweetfin locations open and operational within six months. In 2016, they received additional funding from longtime hospitality executive and "Fast Food Architect" David Swinghamer who is a founding partner at Danny Meyer's Union Square Hospitality. Grand opening on Friday, Feb. 23 at 11 a.m.: To celebrate the grand opening, they’ve partnered with local Hawaiian-style shave ice connoisseur Wailua Shave Ice to give away free shaved ice the first 200 guests who visit their UTC shop. Music, champagne and the magic of giving will come together in a classical piano recital and elegant reception benefiting San Diego Youth Services Hosted by the Daneshmand family, and featuring three-generations of their accomplished piano artistry, this memorable winter afternoon will showcase a musical program of beautiful classical pieces by world-renowned composers. The campus of Congregational Church of La Jolla will offer a beautiful and inviting backdrop for the occasion, which will take place Saturday, Feb. 3, from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. This year's musical celebration represents the fifth in a series of Daneshmand Family Performances, hosted for the benefit of nonprofit organizations dedicated to building stronger families and vibrant communities. Darya, Sahra, and Ava Daneshmand are sisters and San Diego residents. The sisters will take to the stage with their cousins, Saba and Tara, sisters who reside in Los Angeles. Performances by their father, Dr. Siamak Daneshmand, a prominent urologic oncological surgeon at the University of Southern California's Norris Cancer Center, and grandfather, Dr. Hamid Daneshmand, a periodontist, who also lives in Los Angeles, will round out the recital program. "My family is delighted to dedicate this year's recital to San Diego Youth Services, a nonprofit organization dedicated to fighting youth homelessness and youth in crisis," Ladan Daneshmand said. "Our performances offer us a wonderful opportunity to share our love of classical piano music, as well as the joy of playing together, with our audiences. Our family is also passionate about making a difference. Shining a spotlight on San Diego Youth Services, while raising awareness and funding for its important mission, brings our family performances full-circle." There is no cost to attend. Guests, however, are encouraged to make a financial contribution to San Diego Youth Services.To reserve seats, or make a contribution, visit punchbowl.com/part. UC San Diego conference to address U.S.-Mexico 'War on Drugs' The "War on Drugs" has been ongoing for several decades, yet its failure can be felt on both sides of the U.S.-Mexican border­­­­­­­­­­­­­­. In the last 16 years, the opioid epidemic has claimed close to 125,000 lives in the U.S., whereas in Mexico the war on drugs has produced an estimated 200,000 deaths and over 30,000 disappearances in the last decade. The Center for U.S.-Mexican Studies at the University of California San Diego's School of Global Policy and Strategy is hosting on Feb. 9  conference on “Rethinking the War on Drugs and U.S.-Mexico Security Cooperation” that will discuss transnational and local challenges and will seek to propose practical solutions for policymakers in the U.S. and Mexico. “The cooperation of the U.S. and Mexico is more critical now than ever,” said Rafael Fernández de Castro, director of the Center for U.S.-Mexican Studies. “In recent months, the U.S. has publicly embraced unilateral policies to cross-border challenges while Mexico has de-prioritized security issues. As the two countries have turned away from bilateral cooperation, the complex and region-wide factors driving and exacerbating the U.S and Mexico's most pressing security issues have continued unabated.” From a former White House advisor to former directors of Mexico’s intelligence agencies and members of the national media, the conference participants also include top policymakers and scholars from both sides of the border. The panelists’ topics will evaluate Mexico’s many forms of victimization, examine region-wide factors for the resurgence of violence and the status of current U.S.-Mexico security cooperation. “This conference is especially timely with the upcoming elections in Mexico and we hope the event can propose solutions for key stakeholders,” said Cecilia Farfán-Méndez, a visiting fellow at the Center for U.S.-Mexican Studies. “Our goal is to propose a new framework beyond the Mérida Initiative that truly privileges cooperation and shared responsibility rather than confrontation between the U.S. and Mexico." The daylong conference is free and open to the public and will take place from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., on Feb. 9 at the Village Building 2, located on the UC San Diego campus. San Diego Unified middle schools to participate in musical theater program sponsored by La Jolla Playhouse Middle school students in the San Diego Unified School District may be one step closer to their big break. The JumpStart Theatre Program is accepting applications from district middle schools to participate in a three-year, fully-funded musical theater program sponsored by La Jolla Playhouse and the Educational Theatre Association (EdTA). Three district middle schools will be selected to participate in the program during the 2018-19 school year, giving non-theater teachers the skills, support and resources necessary to produce their campus’s first musical through a proven combination of hands-on mentoring and boot-camp style training. This opportunity will expand access to the arts for many San Diego Unified students, underscoring the district’s ongoing commitment to arts education. La Jolla Playhouse was chosen as one of two theater companies in the country to spearhead the national expansion of the highly successful JumpStart Theatre Program, established in 2014 by the Educational Theatre Association in Cincinnati. La Jolla Playhouse has long established itself as an advocate of arts education, through such programs as the Performing Outreach Program Tour and the Young Performers series of summer theater training programs. "We are thrilled to have JumpStart Theatre come to San Diego Unified. What a terrific opportunity for our middle school students to not only have an arts experience but to develop their 21st-century skills,” said San Diego Unified Superintendent Cindy Marten. “We know JumpStart Theatre will continue our vision to transform lives through the arts. Thank you to our great local community partner, La Jolla Playhouse, and to the Educational Theatre Association." The application is open to all San Diego Unified middle schools. Applications are due Feb. 23. Selection criteria includes the commitment of a minimum of three educators from each school who will remain dedicated to the program for the duration. Previous theater experience is not required. Schools will be mentored by La Jolla Playhouse teaching artists throughout the entire program with the goal of building a sustainable, long-term musical theatre curriculum. "We are honored to be one of the inaugural regional partners for EdTA’s JumpStart Theatre program. La Jolla Playhouse is known for – and deeply committed to – the development of new plays and musicals, and the JumpStart Theatre Program provides a terrific proven method of empowering teachers to produce musicals in their middle schools,” said La Jolla Playhouse Managing Director Michael S. Rosenberg. “The opportunity to partner with EdTA and San Diego Unified in bringing the joy of musical theater to students and teachers in our community while building life skills through participation in the arts, could not be a better fit for La Jolla Playhouse.” ‘Your money’s no good’ at Tender Greens venues Your paper money is no longer acceptable at Tender Greens, a fast-casual fare venue that operates in the UTC area, Liberty Station, Mission Valley and downtown San Diego.  Company officials say the move is a response to technological advances and the need to save time. They add that the change is better for the environment amid the lack of need for paper deposit slips and for visits by armored trucks. The credit, debit and mobile payment set-up were tested successfully at the restaurant’s El Segundo outlet. This month, the restaurant is also touting a digital gift card feature on its mobile app. Starbucks in Seattle is considering a similar cashless program. - Martin J. Westlin
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    Local photographer and artisan open joint venture on Fay Ave.
    by BLAKE BUNCH
    Feb 09, 2018 | 11916 views | 0 0 comments | 14 14 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    ‘Salk Autumnal Equinox’ is a prime example of the photographer’s work. / EVGENY YOROBE
    ‘Salk Autumnal Equinox’ is a prime example of the photographer’s work. / EVGENY YOROBE
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    If you have a social media account in San Diego, odds are high that you have seen photographer Evgeny Yorobe’s work. His ethereal depictions of some of the most iconic locations throughout the city are frequently shared at a higher-than-average frequency. Yorobe, a San Diego native, has now partnered with craftsman Will Waters to open a new studio at 7660 Fay Ave. Their grand opening will be held on Saturday, Feb. 10 from 5 to 10 p.m. in conjunction with the La Jolla Art Walk. This is not Yorobe and Water’s first cooperative business effort, however, as the two have worked together over the past three years at the Little Italy and La Jolla farmers markets. Waters’ specialty is high-quality woodwork (Creations By Will). At the studio, one front corner is dedicated to his custom-designed shaving kits. From razors, bowls and brushes, to all-natural shave soaps and after-shaves, his aim is to bring back what he refers to as “the art of shaving” without breaking the bank. His early work was a direct result of serving in the Navy. “When I was in the service, we had to shave every day,” said Waters. “And honestly, I was highly disappointed with what was offered. That’s when I began to do some research, producing my own safety razors. Now, we sell similar razors starting at $40.” Yorobe has close ties to the area. Not only is Scripps Pier, ever popular among photographers (and one of his favorites), within close proximity, but he learned his craft while studying at the University of California San Diego. The light entering their bright studio highlights familiar golden-hour captures of Broken Hill, the Windsansea shack, the Cove, Salk Institute and much more. The photographer’s work is available in a variety of mediums: matte-board paper prints start at $40, then move up in size to around $100. It is perhaps his de-sublimated prints, available on either acrylic or metal, that set the artist’s individual or tryptic pieces apart from all other local photographers. “I have a lab in Scripps Ranch where the larger prints are produced,” said Yorobe. “But with the paper/matte board prints, I can print them right out of the back office in our studio.” Discussing his shot of Scripps Pier, where two times a year the sun lines up perfectly between pilings at sunset, Water and Yorobe wax philosophical. “It’s really great because it can be a little moody and at times dark, but is always beautiful,” Yorobe says. “Every pier is different here, and it’s interesting to see,” said Waters. “Whereas Crystal Pier could see a lot more activity, at Scripps it’s always serene and peaceful – they’re all different.” One question could remain, however. How did the two assimilate to businesses that, on the surface, may not make sense to some. Yorobe and Waters would view the contrary. Both of them are fine artists, and while Yorobe’s visuals may supplement Waters’ craftsmanship and vice versa, their new venture sees them working together in what was seemingly a “Eureka!” moment. “I’m currently working on some entry tables that take into account Evgeny’s compositions,” said Waters. “This has been the most forefront of our collaboration.” The two artists say that they will be incrementally placing new pieces throughout the space as time unfolds. For more information, visit sandiego-landscapes.com, or call 858-467-0952. Also, visit CreationsByWill.com or call 760-835-1853.
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    Day wins Farmers Insurance Open in playoff; Tiger’s comeback draws huge galleries
    Feb 01, 2018 | 25171 views | 0 0 comments | 18 18 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Tiger Woods his out of the rough on hole No. 4  during his round on Sunday, Jan. 28 at the Farmers Insurance Open at Torrey Pines in La Jolla. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Tiger Woods his out of the rough on hole No. 4 during his round on Sunday, Jan. 28 at the Farmers Insurance Open at Torrey Pines in La Jolla. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    Tiger Woods reads a putt on hole No. 5  during his round on Sunday, Jan. 28 at the Farmers Insurance Open at Torrey Pines in La Jolla. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Tiger Woods reads a putt on hole No. 5 during his round on Sunday, Jan. 28 at the Farmers Insurance Open at Torrey Pines in La Jolla. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    Tiger Woods tees off during his round on Sunday, Jan. 28 at the Farmers Insurance Open at Torrey Pines in La Jolla. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Tiger Woods tees off during his round on Sunday, Jan. 28 at the Farmers Insurance Open at Torrey Pines in La Jolla. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    Tiger Woods hits out of the rough during his round on Sunday, Jan. 28 at the Farmers Insurance Open at Torrey Pines in La Jolla. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Tiger Woods hits out of the rough during his round on Sunday, Jan. 28 at the Farmers Insurance Open at Torrey Pines in La Jolla. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    Tiger Woods reads a putt on No. 5 during his round on Sunday, Jan. 28 at the Farmers Insurance Open at Torrey Pines in La Jolla. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Tiger Woods reads a putt on No. 5 during his round on Sunday, Jan. 28 at the Farmers Insurance Open at Torrey Pines in La Jolla. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    Tiger Woods tries to use body english to keep a drive in the fairway during his round on Sunday, Jan. 28 at the Farmers Insurance Open at Torrey Pines in La Jolla. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Tiger Woods tries to use body english to keep a drive in the fairway during his round on Sunday, Jan. 28 at the Farmers Insurance Open at Torrey Pines in La Jolla. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    Tiger Woods fans watch his final round on Sunday, Jan. 28 at the Farmers Insurance Open at Torrey Pines in La Jolla. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Tiger Woods fans watch his final round on Sunday, Jan. 28 at the Farmers Insurance Open at Torrey Pines in La Jolla. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    Tiger Woods and his bunker shadow hit a shot in the fairway during his round on Sunday, Jan. 28 at the Farmers Insurance Open at Torrey Pines in La Jolla. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Tiger Woods and his bunker shadow hit a shot in the fairway during his round on Sunday, Jan. 28 at the Farmers Insurance Open at Torrey Pines in La Jolla. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    Tiger Woods fans watch his round on Sunday, Jan. 28 at the Farmers Insurance Open at Torrey Pines in La Jolla. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Tiger Woods fans watch his round on Sunday, Jan. 28 at the Farmers Insurance Open at Torrey Pines in La Jolla. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    Tiger Woods tees off during his round on Sunday, Jan. 28 at the Farmers Insurance Open at Torrey Pines in La Jolla. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Tiger Woods tees off during his round on Sunday, Jan. 28 at the Farmers Insurance Open at Torrey Pines in La Jolla. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    Tiger Woods shakes the hand of playing partner Hideki Matsuyama on the No. 9 hole after finishing his round on Sunday, Jan. 28 at the Farmers Insurance Open at Torrey Pines in La Jolla. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Tiger Woods shakes the hand of playing partner Hideki Matsuyama on the No. 9 hole after finishing his round on Sunday, Jan. 28 at the Farmers Insurance Open at Torrey Pines in La Jolla. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    Jason Day sank an 18-inch birdie putt on the sixth playoff hole to beat Alex Noren and win the Farmers Insurance Open at Torrey Pines on Monday, Jan. 29. Day and Noren had to return after grinding through five playoff holes Sunday before it got too dark to continue. They played the par-5 18th on Monday morning, their fourth time visiting the finishing hole in the playoff. Tiger Woods, who had to rally on his back nine on Friday to make the cut, finished his up-and-down final round early on Sunday by shooting even par. Woods, who consistently had huge galleries and TV cameras following him throughout the weekend, finished the tournament at 3 under, 7 strokes off the lead. On Monday, Day teed off at 8:04 a.m. and sank the winning putt 13 minutes later, his fourth birdie on the par-5 hole in the playoff. It was Day's 11th PGA Tour win of his career, and first since the 2016 Players Championship. He moved to No. 9 in the FedExCup standings. His victory was accompanied only by the sounds of camera shutters and cheers from Day's family members. Spectators weren't allowed in because organizers said they didn't have time to arrange for security. Noren tried an aggressive second shot from the first cut, but his ball landed short of the green and rolled into Devlin's Billabong, a pond that protects the hole. The Swede moved to 34th in the FedExCup standings with his career-best TOUR finish. Day, meanwhile, hit his second shot out of the rough and over some trees onto the fairway before hitting a beautiful approach shot that set up the winning putt. Noren bogeyed the hole. "It's been a long time coming," said Day. He had a dreadful 2017, which included his mother recovering from lung cancer and a game that lost some discipline and focus. Noren, 35, was trying for his first PGA TOUR win. The Swede, who played at Oklahoma State, has nine victories on the European Tour, including four in 2016. He is No. 19 in the world ranking. It was the longest playoff in the tournament's 67-year history. Day and Noren matched each other with birdie, birdie, par, par and birdie through five playoff holes in the twilight Sunday on the blufftop course overlooking the Pacific Ocean. Ryan Palmer was eliminated on the first extra hole with a par.
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    High surf advisory affects coastal communities in San Diego
    Jan 18, 2018 | 28624 views | 0 0 comments | 36 36 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Kylie Dixon, of Clairemont, checks out a huge wave splashing over a cliff near The Arch at Sunset Cliffs in Point Loma on Thursday, Jan. 18. Dixon, a Mesa College student, was celebrating her birthday with a walk at Sunset Cliffs. THOMAS MELVILLE / PENINSULA BEACON
    Kylie Dixon, of Clairemont, checks out a huge wave splashing over a cliff near The Arch at Sunset Cliffs in Point Loma on Thursday, Jan. 18. Dixon, a Mesa College student, was celebrating her birthday with a walk at Sunset Cliffs. THOMAS MELVILLE / PENINSULA BEACON
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    A huge wave cashes into Sunset Cliffs on Thursday, Jan. 18. THOMAS MELVILLE / PENINSULA BEACON
    A huge wave cashes into Sunset Cliffs on Thursday, Jan. 18. THOMAS MELVILLE / PENINSULA BEACON
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    Two young women enjoy the sun and watch the huge surf rolling in at Sunset Cliffs in Point Loma on Thursday, Jan. 18. THOMAS MELVILLE / PENINSULA BEACON
    Two young women enjoy the sun and watch the huge surf rolling in at Sunset Cliffs in Point Loma on Thursday, Jan. 18. THOMAS MELVILLE / PENINSULA BEACON
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    Max, visiting from Sweden, gets walloped by a massive wave while trying to enter the ocean to surf at Sunset Cliffs in Point Loma on Jan. 18. THOMAS MELVILLE / PENINSULA BEACON
    Max, visiting from Sweden, gets walloped by a massive wave while trying to enter the ocean to surf at Sunset Cliffs in Point Loma on Jan. 18. THOMAS MELVILLE / PENINSULA BEACON
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    Max, visiting from Sweden, jumps into the ocean to surf at Sunset Cliffs in Point Loma on Jan. 18. THOMAS MELVILLE / PENINSULA BEACON
    Max, visiting from Sweden, jumps into the ocean to surf at Sunset Cliffs in Point Loma on Jan. 18. THOMAS MELVILLE / PENINSULA BEACON
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    Kylie Dixon, of Clairemont, watched a giant wave splash near The Arch at Sunset Cliffs in Point Loma on Jan. 18. THOMAS MELVILLE / PENINSULA BEACON
    Kylie Dixon, of Clairemont, watched a giant wave splash near The Arch at Sunset Cliffs in Point Loma on Jan. 18. THOMAS MELVILLE / PENINSULA BEACON
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    Visitors dodge a massive wave crashing into Sunset Cliffs on Thursday, Jan. 18. THOMAS MELVILLE / PENINSULA BEACON
    Visitors dodge a massive wave crashing into Sunset Cliffs on Thursday, Jan. 18. THOMAS MELVILLE / PENINSULA BEACON
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    A surfer is swamped by a huge wave as he tries to enter the ocean at Garbage Beach at Sunset Cliffs on Jan. 18. THOMAS MELVILLE / PENINSULA BEACON
    A surfer is swamped by a huge wave as he tries to enter the ocean at Garbage Beach at Sunset Cliffs on Jan. 18. THOMAS MELVILLE / PENINSULA BEACON
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    A large northwest swell producing large surf will fade into the late afternoon on Thursday, Jan. 18. A new northwest swell will increase the surf again Thursday night, peak Friday, and then gradually diminish late Saturday. Surf will will reach 7 feet high Thursday. Then on Friday, waves will be 5-10 feet high with sets up to 12 feet high through evening. On Saturday, waves will be 4-8 feet high with sets to 10 feet high. The highest surf will occur in southern San Diego County and northern Orange County. A high surf advisory means that high surf will affect beaches in the advisory area, producing rip currents, beach erosion and dangerous swimming conditions. Expect waves overtopping jetties and coastal rocks as well as sneaker waves. There may be some minor coastal flooding during high tides.
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    New study to evaluate airplane flight paths and noise in coastal neighborhoods
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Jan 17, 2018 | 10296 views | 1 1 comments | 24 24 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    This composite photo shows dozens of planes taking off from San Diego International Airport and headed over Point Loma. A new study will evaluate how flight paths and noise impacts Peninsula neighborhoods.   OLIVER ASIS / CONTRIBUTOR
    This composite photo shows dozens of planes taking off from San Diego International Airport and headed over Point Loma. A new study will evaluate how flight paths and noise impacts Peninsula neighborhoods. OLIVER ASIS / CONTRIBUTOR
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    A new study titled “Part 150” has been green lighted to evaluate flight-path improvements and noise reductions in and around San Diego International Airport. Noise has been a real sore spot for coastal residents from the Point to La Jolla, who allege flight-path changes the past couple years have negatively impacted their lifestyles. Recently, District 2 Councilmember Lorie Zapf spoke before the Airport Authority on the  merits of the Part 150 study. “As your council member, I have advocated for reduction in airport noise in our communities,” Zapf said. “As part of my support for the Part 150 study, I have requested the FAA be a proactive partner to improve the quality of life in surrounding communities.” Part 150, a federal aviation regulation, guides and controls planning for aviation noise compatibility on and around airports. The federal regulation establishes procedures, standards and methodologies to be used by airport operators for preparation of Airport Noise Exposure Maps.  Such exposure maps are used in the Quieter Home Program, the San Diego County Regional Airport Authority’s Residential Sound Insulation Program. The FAA has determined that residences within the 65-plus decibel-level limit around SDIA may be eligible for sound-insulation treatments to mitigate aircraft noise. The FAA has set a goal of reducing interior-noise levels for eligible residents by at least five decibels inside the home, providing a noticeable noise reduction. But not everyone is certain the Part 150 study will be a cure-all for decreasing airport noise in communities directly impacted from alleged flight-path changes. One skeptic is Gary Wonacott, Mission Beach Town Council president. “Clearly, the FAA modifications benefitted some areas of Mission Beach, mainly the north, and negatively impacted South Mission Beach,” Wonacott said. “According to responses from residents in PB and La Jolla, they were also negatively impacted by some of the flight path changes. “The key point here is that Part 150 cannot be used to assess the benefits of the procedural changes proposed for Mission Beach and La Jolla, because these communities are not in the 65-decibel area. As you know, currently, the majority of our noise complaints come outside our 65-decibel contour,” Wonacott said. Wonacott admitted, however, the FAA is showing a willingness to compromise. “The FAA has demonstrated that they are willing to look at procedural changes that reduce noise outside the 65 decibel limit,” he said. Point Loman Casey Schnoor has been a watchdog for the NextGen and airport noise situation for more than two years. A citizen’s representative on a 15-member airport subcommittee, Schnoor and his colleagues came up with 21 recommendations for “quieting” airport noise in coastal communities in the airport’s flight path, following a year of deliberations. Schnoor talked about the goal of those 21 recommendations. “The goal is to mitigate the impacts to the communities of any of those flight paths, or adjacent to those flight paths,” he said. Is the Part 150 a step in the right direction? “I am cautiously optimistic,” Schnoor replied. “Part 150 is a process. It appears to be the best vehicle to execute all those [recommended] changes.” Schnoor noted Part 150 is an 18- to 24-month process. “We don’t want to sit on our hands for two years, when a lot of these things are problems today,” Schnoor said, adding, it’s also important to continue monitoring “day-to-day issues and procedures” with airport operations. That needs to be done, he said, to hold the federal agency accountable for its operations, and to ensure the Airport Authority remains responsive to citizens’ concerns and complaints about aircraft noise. Schnoor said the airport points to noise issues remaining relatively stable the past couple years. But he’s quick to caution: “You need to look at the multi-year picture, year over year. At a quick glance (at recent data), nothing has changed. But if you go back to 2014 and see the data on missed approaches, early turns, curfew violations, etc. you’ll see where the current figures have come down from.”
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    casey schnoor
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    January 18, 2018
    Mr. Schwab,

    Thank you for your informative reporting in this week’s Beach and Bay related publications as well as making time for our conversation last week.

    However, I would like to point out two areas of important clarification:

    1) As part of our conversation as well as the written information I provided to you last week, I was focused upon the very important community expectation that a FAA 7100.41a (“41a”) analysis is to be conducted “in conjunction with” and “in concert with” the Part 150 study. The importance of the concurrent 41a study was also emphasized by members of the SDCRAA Board of Directors during their discussion to approve the Part 150 process on December 7th. This very important link was missing from your article.

    In sum, SDCRAA has provided the community with their assurances that in their discussions with FAA, FAA has stated their willingness to do a concurrant 41a. This is most important as there is a critical nexus between the two efforts in that the 41a may be required by FAA to execute on many of the route revisions, as requested within the subcommittee list. Therefore, to avoid further delays to the study, the 41a study needs to be initiated concurrant with the Part 150 as it is a is critical componet for the timely success of the Part 150 process. Please note however that commencing the 41a process is at the sole discretion of the FAA and therefore it is a key element that the community has been and will continue to press SDCRAA to firm up with FAA, beyond their current “assurances”.

    2) In quoting me, “You need to look at the multi-year picture, year over year. At a quick glance (at recent the data), nothing has changed. But if you go back to 2014 and see the data on missed approaches, early turns, curfew violations, etc. you’ll see where the current figures have come down from.”

    The key context that is missing from this quote is that when looking at year over year data, each of the various violations tracked spiked significantly up during or after 2014 to never before reached peaks, so that “where the current figures have come down from” …. must be compared to 2014 and before to see that these violation events, while at or in some cases below their peaks, still remain well above 2014 and years prior. Further, these are “day to day” matters that are under the direct day to day control of FAA’s Air Traffic Control (“ATC”) located adjacent to Miramar Air Station and, while inclusive within the 21 subcommittee recommendations to explored within the Part 150, they can be directly addressed by ATC today, not after the lengthy Part 150 process.

    These are both very important elements of the communities poisiton. As such, your further clarifiacation and amplication of these points would be greatly appreciated.

    Should you need further clarificaiton, I would be more than happy to assist as needed to promote these key points.

    Sincerely,

    R. Casey Schnoor

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