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    Three new bike share businesses roll into San Diego
    Feb 23, 2018 | 4352 views | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    LimeBike's bright green bicycles.
    LimeBike's bright green bicycles.
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    ofo's yellow bikes.
    ofo's yellow bikes.
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    Mobike's silver and orange bikes.
    Mobike's silver and orange bikes.
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    Walking to a destination has become passé. San Diegans are now rolling, as three new bike share businesses started peddling their dock-less cycles throughout the City in the past two weeks. LimeBike brought out its bright green bicycles on Feb. 16, making it the first dock-free bike share business to launch in the City. Soon after, Ofo planned to began deploying its yellow bikes to share. And on Feb. 23, Mobike rolls out its signature silver and orange dock-less bikes to locations in San Diego. After launching in Imperial Beach and National City last year, LimeBike expanded its service area to all of San Diego. They also plan to roll out their Electric Assist Bike model, dubbed Lime-E, and soon a scooter, called Lime-S, making San Diego the first market to have all three LimeBike options. LimeBikes are available in more than 45 markets. All their bikes are GPS and 3G-enabled, making it simple for riders to find, unlock and pick up a nearby bike using their smartphone. When the ride is finished, riders simply lock the bike's back wheel and responsibly park between the pedestrian-designated sidewalk and the street curb, or at a bike rack. To celebrate the launch, riders can use code “SDLIMEBIKE5” for $5 in credits towards rides until end of February. Since first launching in LA last November, Ofo has seen a positive response from folks who have welcomed a greener and more affordable way to travel. Whether it’s filling a transportation gap during a morning commute, running errands during lunch, or enjoying the outdoors on the weekends, Ofo riders appreciate the convenience and availability of bike sharing when and where they want it. How it works: Open the app and find all the bright yellow bikes around you. When you're at the bike, tap "unlock" and scan the barcode to automatically unlock and enjoy the ride. Simply park your bike and manually lock it to end the trip. To celebrate their entrance into San Diego, ofo is offering free rides through the end of February.   San Diego becomes Mobike’s fifth U.S. market, and adds to the company’s global expansion into more than 200 cities and 12 countries in less than two years.   Using specially-designed bikes equipped with GPS and proprietary smart-lock technology, Mobike enables users of its smartphone app to find a bike near them, to reserve and unlock it. After reaching their destination, users manually lock the bike, which automatically makes the bike available to the next rider. One of Mobike’s core principles is responsible operating, meaning the quantity and location of bikes are exclusively based on supply and demand. This tactic maximizes impact while reducing congestion, ensuring bikes are where the community needs them, when they need them. To find out more about the new bike sharing businesses, visit mobike.com, ofo.com, and limebike.com.
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    Loma Portal Little League celebrates 60th anniversary
    by SCOTT HOPKINS
    Feb 21, 2018 | 1900 views | 0 0 comments | 6 6 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    An intriguing collection of automobiles surrounds the original field at Loma Portal Little League during Opening Day ceremonies in 1958. The league, now known as Peninsula Little League, will observe its 60th anniversary this year when play opens Feb. 24.
    An intriguing collection of automobiles surrounds the original field at Loma Portal Little League during Opening Day ceremonies in 1958. The league, now known as Peninsula Little League, will observe its 60th anniversary this year when play opens Feb. 24.
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    Sixty years ago, a dream became reality when a group of community members constructed Loma Portal Little League. Now, some of the boys who were in uniform for the league's first Opening Day are planning a reunion when the league, now known as Peninsula Little League, stages its 60th Opening Day ceremonies Feb. 24. Ceremonies begin at 9 a.m. on the field, located in what is now Bill Cleator Park at 2314 Famosa Blvd. The complex of youth baseball fields was founded in 1958 by the late A. E. (Red) Berndes and ranks as one of San Diego's oldest and longest-operating Little Leagues. Berndes' son Jon is organizing the reunion while younger brother Scott will serve as emcee. So far, about 30 members of those first teams are expected to attend and renew friendships with former teammates, opponents and perhaps coaches. Many former players went on to play at Point Loma High while two members of the 1963 Loma Portal Little League All-Star team, Jim Fuller and John Balaz, even went on to reach the majors in professional baseball. All "alumni" of Loma Portal Little League are invited to attend the reunion and renew friendships with former teammates and coaches. Thousands of area youngsters have begun their baseball experience at the Loma Portal Little League fields, pounding leather gloves, launching pitched balls, fielding fly balls and grounders, all while inhaling the memorable scent of fresh-cut grass. Some of those original "Boys of Summer" are now entering their 70s, but the great memories of their baseball days make them seem like they took place yesterday.
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    Residents rally to move recycling center from Voltaire Street
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Feb 16, 2018 | 5763 views | 2 2 comments | 10 10 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Peninsula Community Planning Board chair Jon Linney (right) speaks at the Feb. 10 rally next to Stump’s. THOMAS MELVILLE / PENINSULA BEACON
    Peninsula Community Planning Board chair Jon Linney (right) speaks at the Feb. 10 rally next to Stump’s. THOMAS MELVILLE / PENINSULA BEACON
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    A neighborhood coup is underway to compel Prince Recycling Center to move from its present site at 3770 Voltaire St., adjoining Stump’s Family Marketplace, to a more suitable spot in Midway District behind Big Lots off Rosecrans Street. Some residents, who feel the recycler is misplaced and want it moved, rallied in front of the recycler at Stumps on Feb. 10. Nearby residents, corridor businesses, the nonprofit Point Loma Association and market owner Dirk Stump weighed-in with the media on their cause.  The rally was to draw attention to alleged crime-related issues associated with homeless utilizing, and loitering, in and around the allegedly problematic recycler. Recycling center owner Jamie Prince said he was mystified, and a little taken aback, by public reaction to his operations. “I was never contacted by anyone at all about any problems,” Prince told the Peninsula Beacon. “Then all of a sudden, it was all over social media and I said, ‘What’s going on?’” Prince feels scapegoated. “I’m not the reason for the homeless problem in the area,” he said, noting “there’s always been a homeless problem.” He added, “I have a clean site and the homeless are just a small part of our business.”  Prince pointed out, under state law, “We can’t refuse a person service.” He pointed out the number one rule at his center is “no shopping carts,” adding he always tries to be a good neighbor and respond to the community’s concerns. Rally spokesperson Margaret Virissimo, a member of the Peninsula Community Planning Board, said she and others tried unsuccessfully to reach Prince offline. She noted the purpose of the rally was being mischaracterized. “It really wasn’t a protest so much,” Virissimo said. “We definitely don’t want to see [Prince] go [out of business]. We want to help him relocate, and even offered to fundraise to help with his moving costs to show him we care.” Virissimo contended Prince Recycling “is in too small a space and that it is negatively affecting nearby businesses.” She added the center, and its lingering homeless population, is a threat given its proximity to three local schools. “Neighborhood recycling centers should be a positive asset, however, the Point Loma recycling center has caused several neighborhood problems,” said District 2 Councilmember Lorie Zapf. “In fact, calls to SDPD for service to this block have increased by more than 50 percent.” Zapf aide Conrad Wear noted recent police statistics show a direct causal connection between local crime and the recycling center’s location. “We used the call rate from January 2017 to August 2017 to project calls through the end of that year,” said Wear. “They would have totaled 156. After comparing that to 2015, we have seen an approximately 59 percent increase in calls to service to this location between 2015 and 2017, from 93 to 156.”  Julie Borcher chairs the PLA’s Public Safety Committee. She said the civic group has researched the CalRecycle program, under which Prince’s center operates and, according to her, is receiving state subsidies.   “The state requires stores like Stump’s to provide CA CRV redemption for bottles and cans within a one-half mile radius,” Borcher said. “Stump’s was required by the state to provide this type of facility or face $100 per day in penalties.” Borcher contended having recyclers in the middle of neighborhoods, like Prince’s, “may have made some sense in the early 1980s when the program was introduced and curb side recycling was less common. But the PLA believes the program is leading to the degradation of neighborhoods in which these centers are located.”    Market owner Dirk Stump said no one wants Prince’s relocated more than him. “It’s a problem for the store,” Stump said, adding the constant homeless presence “scares off the elderly, kids and moms.” Stump said he’s personally been victimized by a homeless woman, now serving time in custody, who came in and destroyed merchandise in the market, and threatened him personally, before being subdued and arrested. “I’ve been trying to get [recycling center] moved ever since,” Stump said. “Protests and photo-ops are great for gaining public awareness of an issue,” said PCPB chair Jon Linney, one of three protest organizers at the Feb. 10 rally. Said Linney: “More important are the breakthroughs we are achieving on something that has frustrated the community for more than three years. I could not be prouder of the way everyone has conducted themselves.” Another PCPB member, Don Sevrens, said recycling rally organizers have reached out to Ken Da Rosa, deputy director of CalRecycle. “They are hoping the agency might be willing to try a more cooperative, more proactive approach,” Sevrens said. Opponents of the recycling center at Stump’s are petitioning State Assemblyman Todd Gloria to carry legislation, which would need to be sponsored soon, to expand the half-mile requirement for recycling centers to possibly allow it to be moved from Stump’s to the proposed Midway District location.
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    Geoff Page
    |
    February 16, 2018
    I don't understand the claim that they could not contact Prince. He has a Facebook page with a telephone number. I called the number and he answered after two rings. I believe he is telling the truth when he claimed he was not contacted before this all happened.
    PeninsulaPat
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    February 16, 2018
    Maybe they can move it to the shopping center further up the Point where Jensens is. Oh wait, they can't put it there because it would attract the wrong element, just like a CVS would.
    Celebrating Black History Month: Former San Diego Gulls winger Willie O'Ree broke NHL color barrier with Boston
    by SCOTT HOPKINS
    Feb 14, 2018 | 6860 views | 2 2 comments | 12 12 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Willie O'Ree prepares to drop a ceremonial puck before a recent San Diego Gulls game. O'Ree, a former Gulls player, was the first black player in the NHL 60 years ago. At left is current Gull Jaycob Megna and at right John McCarthy of the San Jose Barracuda. SAN DIEGO GULLS / COURTESY
    Willie O'Ree prepares to drop a ceremonial puck before a recent San Diego Gulls game. O'Ree, a former Gulls player, was the first black player in the NHL 60 years ago. At left is current Gull Jaycob Megna and at right John McCarthy of the San Jose Barracuda. SAN DIEGO GULLS / COURTESY
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    Former member of the San Diego Gulls Willie O'Ree, left, is presented a jersey by the current Gulls team during a night honoring the legendary O'Ree. The native of Fredericton, New Brunswick was the first black player in the National Hockey League when he joined the Boston Bruins in 1958. SAN DIEGO GULLS / COURTESY
    Former member of the San Diego Gulls Willie O'Ree, left, is presented a jersey by the current Gulls team during a night honoring the legendary O'Ree. The native of Fredericton, New Brunswick was the first black player in the National Hockey League when he joined the Boston Bruins in 1958. SAN DIEGO GULLS / COURTESY
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    On Jan. 18, 1958, a young hockey player was called up from the minor leagues to join the Boston Bruins of the National Hockey League, who were in Montreal for a game at the Forum, home of the Canadiens. His name was Willie O'Ree, and history was made that night. Why? O'Ree is black. And, while he only played in two games that season, the color barrier in professional hockey had been broken, giving O'Ree the honorable designation as the "Jackie Robinson of hockey." Born Oct. 15, 1935, in the coal-mining town of Fredericton, New Brunswick, O'Ree was the youngest of 13 children. Driven to succeed in both athletics and academics, he soon began to believe he could compete in sports at a pro level. As a youngster in 1949, he also received an invitation from the Atlanta Braves to their minor league baseball camp. When he deplaned in Atlanta, he recalls seeing the drinking fountains marked "White Only" and "Colored Only." While in the United States, however, O'Ree had the opportunity to meet black baseball star Jackie Robinson in Brooklyn. “I knew he broke the color barrier,” O’Ree recalls, “and when I actually met him he said, ‘There’s no black kids that play hockey.’ And I said, ‘Yeah, there’s a few.'” Robinson told him “Whatever sport you choose, work hard and do your very best. Things will work out for you.” O'Ree returned in 1961 to play 43 games for the Bruins, scoring four goals and adding 10 assists. And while those were the only games he played in the NHL, the door had opened for black players to compete at the highest level. O'Ree's greatest strengths were the speed with which he could skate and his checking ability on defense. While he was not imposing in stature at 5 feet 10 inches tall and 170 pounds, his toughness, determination and speed allowed him to make a considerable impact driving opposing players into the boards. His Boston teammates stuck up for him, but in one game Eric Nesterenko of the Chicago Black Hawks hit him in the face with the butt end of his stick, knocking out two of O'Ree's teeth and breaking his nose. O'Ree responded by hitting Nesterenko over the head with his stick, igniting a fight between the teams... with Nesterenko acquiring 15 new stitches in his head. "I was prepared for it [verbal and physical abuse] because I knew it would happen. I wasn’t a great slugger, but I did my share of fighting. I was determined that I wasn’t going to be run out of the rink,” O'Ree recalled. In 1967, general manager Max McNabb of the nascent San Diego Gulls of the Western Hockey League acquired O'Ree from the rival Los Angels Blades, and O'Ree immediately became a fan favorite as he accelerated to full skating speed in four or five strides and rushed the opponents' net. Record-size minor league crowds at the then San Diego Sports Arena roared as O'Ree won the WHL goal-scoring title with 38 in 1968-69. With his 41 assists, he totaled 79 points in 70 games. After his retirement in 1979, O'Ree settled in San Diego and today lives in La Mesa. O'Ree kept a secret during his playing career that spanned 28 years: One afternoon in the mid 1950s, a puck ricocheted off a stick and struck O'Ree in the right eye, shattering his retina. He lost 97 percent of the vision in the eye, which had to be removed years later. Doctors urged him to hang up his skates. Eight weeks later he was back on the ice where he switched from left wing to right wing so he could see the puck better, yet fearing his career would end if his handicap were discovered. Eventually, the NHL took note of O'Ree's historic status and in 1998 invited him to be the director of youth development for its Diversity Task Force, a nonprofit program for minority youth that provides equipment and ice time so inner-city kids might learn and play hockey in its "Hockey is for Everyone" program. On Jan. 19, 2008, the Boston Bruins and NHL honored O'Ree at TD Garden marking the 50th anniversary of his debut. Those in attendance included a busload of O'Ree's friends from his native Fredericton. The next month, ESPN aired a special program on O'Ree in honor of Black History Month. Last month marked the 60th anniversary of O'Ree's first game, and O'Ree once again returned to Boston to be honored. "It’s wonderful and I was thrilled," O'Ree recalled. "When I was in Boston [last month] it took me back to when I first came to the Bruins and the training camp in 1957. I kind of fell in love with the team and the entire Bruins organization." NHL Commissioner Gary Bettman noted O'Ree has impacted more than 40,000 children in his 20-year NHL ambassador career. "Willie has a resolve and an inner strength that allows him to do what he believes and not let anything get in his way," Bettman said. O'Ree has received many other awards including the Order of Canada, the highest civilian award for a Canadian citizen. The love affair between San Diego hockey fans and Willie O'Ree has continued to grow over the decades. When not on the road as part of his NHL commitment, O'Ree, now 82 years old, can be found enjoying a San Diego Gulls game at the Valley View Casino Center. Always upbeat, he never denies an autograph request. While his number 20 jersey has hung from the arena rafters for several years, the Gulls recently honored O'Ree at a Diversity Night-themed game. He conducted the ceremonial puck drop to a standing ovation from over 8,500 fans. O'Ree has overcome much in his life and, through hard work and determination, earned his status as a local legend and hero. QUOTABLE:  FROM HOCKEY LEGEND WILLIE O'REE “Racist remarks from fans were much worse in the U.S. cities than in Toronto and Montreal. I particularly remember a few incidents in Chicago. The fans would yell, ‘Go back to the South’ and ‘How come you’re not picking cotton?’ Things like that. It didn’t bother me. Hell, I’d been called names most of my life. I just wanted to be a hockey player, and if they couldn’t accept that fact, that was their problem, not mine. “In the penalty box, stuff would be thrown at me and they’d spit at me. I never fought one time because of racial remarks. But I said, ‘If I’m going to leave the league, it’s because I don’t have the skills or the ability to play anymore. I’m not going to leave it ’cause some guy makes a threat or tries to get me off my game by making racial remarks towards me." "We have approximately 32 cities in the Hockey is For Everyone program, and the first thing I say is to these boys and girls is to stay in school and get an education. Education is the key. You can’t go anywhere today in the world without an education."  "You need to set goals for yourselves, and you need to work towards your goals and believe and feel good about yourself and like yourself." "If you think you can then you can, and if you think you can’t, you’re right."     
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    Doug 1974
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    February 14, 2018
    I remember watching O'Ree when he played with the old L.A. Blades of the WHL and the writer is correct, O'Ree was an amazingly fast skater. It's too bad he was born a generation too early as he would have been a big NHL star once the league expanded.
    Scott Hopkins
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    February 15, 2018
    Good point, Doug. The players in the old Western Hockey League probably would be NHLers today with 31 teams. Back in the day, the NHL consisted of only six teams, leaving very few roster spots for players like Willie. But then we may never have had the privilege of seeing him play in San Diego!
    Ocean Beach woman’s vision and hard work creates successful Annie Margot Designs
    by LUCIA VITI
    Feb 13, 2018 | 4101 views | 1 1 comments | 11 11 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Ocean Beach resident Annie Margot St. Lifer with her eclectic collection of African Mud Cloth-embellished, Levi-denim jackets.
    Ocean Beach resident Annie Margot St. Lifer with her eclectic collection of African Mud Cloth-embellished, Levi-denim jackets.
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    Chic. Funky. Cool. One-of-a-kind designer jackets, presented by Annie Margot Designs, are splashing their way through San Diego. Spearheaded by fashion designer Annie Margot St. Lifer, this eclectic collection of African Mud Cloth-embellished, Levi-denim jackets are replete with color, swank and fashion pizzazz. An array of “100 percent handmade,” tailored denim overlays weave trendy with vintage, showcasing the young designer’s extraordinary talent. In less than a year, St. Lifer’s one-time hobby turned business venture has” blossomed into a reality right before my eyes.” Humbled by her own success, the Ocean Beach resident admits that “my dream evolved into a successful assembly line of artisan professionals who are dedicated to supporting each other.” Encouraged by “the environment” and “fellow artisans” the former New Yorker describes her journey as a step-by-step process that began with kudos. Within weeks of arriving in the coastal city, the “artisan shop gal” immersed herself in San Diego’s “maker’s culture,” a scene she describes as “big,” to learn everything she could about the local artisan ethos. “San Diego’s a small big city that hosts a large maker’s scene,” she said. “Artisans support artisans and local makers support each other. After creating my first jacket for fun, everyone encouraged me to pursue designing more.” St. Lifer designed her first jacket with a “deconstructed Banjara belt that I found in a flea market in Santa Cruz.” An instant hit, she fabricated more with vestiges from thrifting excursions – Afghan beads, Indian elephant designs and reconstructed handbags – “found in my closet.” Encouraged by the positive feedback, she tested her next batch on Instagram. When the entire inventory sold out within 48 hours, the budding fashionista knew she found her niche. The Maryland native quickly put her passion into action. Always “obsessed” with thrifting, St. Lifer continued her “treasure hunts” in Goodwill and Salvation Army stores, consignment shops, flea and farmer’s markets and second-hand boutique stores. “The magic really begins with thrifting through every consignment shop imaginable,” she continued. “Thrifting’s a passion. I’ve accumulated quite the unique collection of statement pieces – vintage band tee’s, ’80s denims, designer handbags, fabrics and textiles.” While honeymooning in Thailand, she “fell in love” with the country’s myriad of colored and patterned textiles and fabrics. African Mud Cloth became the lightbulb moment for making her brand “cohesive.” African Mud Cloth, a popular textile from Mali Africa, is made with fermented mud, a time-consuming process described as strange and cumbersome. The fabric contains a tapestry of colorful, detailed patterns popular in fashion, design and art. “African Mud Cloth speaks to my heart,” she said. “The hearty cloth is funky, versatile and beautiful. The colors are simple but the textile’s filled with intricate details. Pillows and throws are often made from huge pieces of this fabric. African Mud Cloth won’t fall off the trending bandwagon. It’s too classic and timeless.” St. Lifer’s refusal to use anything but vintage Levi jackets, makes production “more difficult because I don’t have a lot of inventory all at once.” However, St. Lifer has no plans to change jacket brand because “Levi’s a classic, great, American denim brand.” “Every Annie Margot Design jacket is a quality, handmade product,” she explained. “And I wouldn’t have it any other way.” While surprised by her instant success, St. Lifer’s not shocked. Annie Margot Designs has been “years in the making.” Touting a fashion and merchandising degree from West Virginia University, the Mountaineer has been thrifting since college, garnering ideas, inspirations and all things vintage. She moved to the Big Apple in 2009 to pursue a career in fashion, landing a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity as an intern in Fendi’ s Visual Merchandising Department. The tour-de-force turned employee became an assistant store manager within six years. New York City became a haven for collecting “precious possessions.” “I’m surprised, proud and excited by my success,” she said. “But I’m not shocked. I’ve put a lot of everything into Annie Margot Designs. My visions to create became distracted by life until I moved to San Diego. Despite working for an extraordinary company like Fendi in New York, here I focus on what I wanted to do among my people - other artisans. “I learned who I was in Morgantown,” she concluded. “In New York City I became her. Now I’m building my dream in Ocean Beach. Every stage along the way has made me more comfortable with who I am; designer Annie Margot St. Lifer – that’s who I am!” Annie Margot Designs also include zip pouches. Embellished jeans will soon follow. Custom orders are available. Annie Margot Designer jackets can be purchased in Ocean Beach’s Often Wander at Noon and Costal Natives; La Jolla’s Totem Boutique and Trilogy Sanctuary, as well as online at www.anniemargotdesigns.com.
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    Gail Cohen
    |
    February 14, 2018
    Gorgeous, great story.
    News
    Missing woman’s body found on Mission Beach
    On Saturday, Feb. 18, Amanda Cruse arrived in San Diego from out of town. That afternoon, Cruse visited the area of Sunset Cliffs. On Sunday, Feb. 19, at approximately 5 a.m., Cruse traveled back t...
    Published - Tuesday, March 07
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    LA Jolla music calendar
    Friday, March 10 Rheanna Downey, singer-songwriter, Noon. UTC Palm Plaza; Carissa Schroeder, singer-songwriter, 4 p.m. Duke’s; Dev Lov, singer-songwriter. 5 p.m. Farmer & The Seahorse; Jeffrey Dean...
    Published - Tuesday, March 07
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    Trees to be removed along northbound I-5
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    Published - Tuesday, March 07
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    A gem of a business: Beads and More has silver anniversary
    Its silver anniversary is strung together with hundreds of thousands of beads and a treasure trove of handcrafted jewelry. On April 25, Beads and More, in The Promenade at Pacific Beach shopping ce...
    Published - Monday, March 06
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    ‘Huffing’ driver who killed Pacific Beach girl, gets 10 year sentence
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    Published - Monday, March 06
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    MADCAPS to hold annual benefit show 'On Broadway' March 9-11
    Mothers and Daughters Club Assisting Philanthropies (MADCAPS) celebrates 57 years of community service with its annual benefit show Thursday, March 9 through Saturday, March 11, in Point Loma Nazar...
    Published - Saturday, March 04
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    Pizza Port and Marina Kitchen collaborate to create bee beer
    Marriott Marquis San Diego's Marina Kitchen has teamed up with award-winning San Diego brewery, Pizza Port Brewing Co., to create a one-time spring brew, which was brewed and kegged at their Ocean ...
    Published - Friday, March 03
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    Community briefs for Ocean Beach and Point Loma
    Friday Night Liberty Spring in to Art at Friday Night Liberty at Liberty Station on March 3 from 5 to 9 p.m. This is San Diego’s most unique, fun and authentic event to find locally made art and gi...
    Published - Friday, March 03
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    Landon Donovan to play in San Diego Sockers’ Celebrity Game
    The San Diego Sockers will be holding their second annual Celebrity Game at 5:05 p.m. Sunday, March 12 at the Valley View Casino Center. The home game will be the First Round Divisional match versu...
    Published - Friday, March 03
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    Point Loma singer-songwriter Briahhna brings passion to performances
    While many other musical communities are reporting their music communities are in decline, San Diego seems to be escaping that drought, with a wealth of new musicians emerging seemingly daily, both...
    Published - Friday, March 03
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    Fundraising drive begins for new veterans plaza in Ocean Beach
    The Ocean Beach Community Development Corporation has kicked off its long-awaited fundraising drive to create a new and improved plaza honoring military veterans. “We got the right of entry permit ...
    Published - Friday, March 03
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    All Souls’ Episcopal Church hosts ‘Icons in Transformation’ exhibit
    The strikingly beautiful sanctuary of All Souls’ Episcopal Church in Point Loma is being transformed into an international art show by acclaimed abstract expressionist Ludmila Pawlowska. On March 5...
    Published - Thursday, March 02
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    SD Blood Bank rewards The Gillispie School
    On Wednesday, March 1, a representative from the San Diego Blood Bank visited The Gillispie School in La Jolla for a check presentation ceremony. Grade 3 students and teachers organized a blood dri...
    Published - Thursday, March 02
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    Peninsula Planning Board approves liquor shop in Point Loma
    Overriding concerns from some neighbors, Peninsula Community Planning Board voted overwhelmingly in February to allow Sunshine Liquor to relocate up Voltaire Street to a strip mall near a consignme...
    Published - Thursday, March 02
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