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    La Jolla businesses offer fun ideas for a daycation
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Mar 17, 2019 | 10309 views | 0 0 comments | 6 6 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Owned by Robert Mackey and Kai Koehnke, La Jolla Golf Carts started out as a promotion of their sister company, La Jolla Social, to help folks get around town. But it was such a good and workable idea, that the golf carts quickly became a hit on their own.
    Owned by Robert Mackey and Kai Koehnke, La Jolla Golf Carts started out as a promotion of their sister company, La Jolla Social, to help folks get around town. But it was such a good and workable idea, that the golf carts quickly became a hit on their own.
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    A handful of 2 1/2-hour tours at Fly Rides highlight the beauty – and history – of La Jolla.
    A handful of 2 1/2-hour tours at Fly Rides highlight the beauty – and history – of La Jolla.
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    Ever heard of a staycation? In La Jolla they have one better. It’s being referred to as a “daycation.”  And it’s something available from merchants offering tours, like San Diego Fly Rides, La Jolla Golf Carts and Pedego Electric Bikes. Max Shenk, operations manager of San Diego Fly Rides at 7444 Girard Ave., said locals and tourists alike take advantage of bicycling tours they offer daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. “When we first started out it was mostly tourist-driven,” said Shenk of Fly Rides. “But now we have a lot of locals who go themselves, or who have guests in town who want to do the tour.” Fly Rides started out small in an art studio space on Prospect, before spreading its wings and moving to Girard Avenue across from the Pannikin. The new space is filled to the rafters with pedal-assisted e-bikes of every imaginable type, both rentals and for sale. The retail space also has a full-service shop for repairs in the back. Fly Rides accommodates everyone from serious cyclists, to families to people just looking for a leisure day of exercise.  A handful of 2 1/2-hour tours at Fly Rides highlight the beauty – and history – of La Jolla. Torrey Pines Bike & Hike escorts guests through UC San Diego. Two of the most popular tours, costing $99 and $79, respectively, are SoCal Riviera and Cali Dreaming. SoCal Riviera is a loop of coastal La Jolla with a climb up Mount Soledad. Cali Dreaming is a downscaled version omitting the climb. On a recent weekend tour, native La Jollan Peter Hulburt of Fly Rides escorted Lyn Mettler, a visiting travel writer from Indiana, on the SoCal Riviera. Starting at La Jolla Cove, Hurlbert and guest took in the scenery, seals, sea lions and exquisite ocean views. The group stopped periodically for Hulbert to narrate a history of each area and its famous residents, like Ellen Browning Scripps.  At the Cove, the bike guide pointed out gnarled, leaning trees there that inspired famed children’s author Theodore “Dr. Seuss” Geisel’s work and art. Then it was south through Scripps Park to Windansea Beach, with Hulburt pointing out the high-profile surf breaks along the way. The SoCal Riviera Tour takes its name from the multimillion-dollar homes along the way in the downtown Village, at Windansea and on Mount Soledad. The tour wound through the popular La Jolla bike path between Bird Rock and La Jolla High School, with a stop to admire a huge cactus plant of the agave family from which tequila is made.  Returning to Girard, it was hard to believe 2 1/2 hours had elapsed. A similar, yet different, “daycation” experience is to be had at La Jolla Golf Carts at 7512 La Jolla Blvd. near the corner of Pearl Street.  Owned by Robert Mackey and Kai Koehnke, La Jolla Golf Carts started out as a promotion of their sister company, La Jolla Social, to help folks get around town. But it was such a good and workable idea, that the golf carts quickly became a hit on their own. “It started out with, ‘You need a ride here?,’” said Mackey, “Then it became, ‘It would be cool to drive it yourself.’ We basically turned it into a rental car company.” “We call it a self-guided tour,” said Mackey of La Jolla Golf Carts, which rents vehicles by the day, week or month. “It’s a great way to cruise around and enjoy beautiful La Jolla,” said Mackey. “We ended up helping a lot of people solve a transportation problem around the Village.” Mackey noted golf carts are especially handy for the aged, infirm or injured. Patrons at La Jolla Golf Carts have to be at least 21 years old. Families are not only welcome but are a centerpiece of the business, which offers four- and six-passenger carts for rentals, with plenty of kid space. Four-passenger carts rent for $169 a day, $189 a day for a six-passenger cart. “Our carts are street legal and have upgraded safety features,” pointed out Mackey noting carts have a 20 mph speed limit. La Jolla Golf Carts is open seven days a week, 365 days a year from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Go a bit south to Bird Rock, where Pedego Electric Bikes La Jolla has made a name for itself indulging biker’s need to proceed. “Most of our tours are custom and range from friends and family tours to corporate ‘team-building’ tours,” said Pedego spokesperson Tracy Sheffer. Pedego tours include: La Jolla Coastal/Mount Soledad National Monument Lunch Tour; Lookout Tour along the La Jolla Coastline to the La Jolla Cove, La Jolla Shores optional; Couples “Champaign Toast” Romantic Tour along the La Jolla Coastline to the La Jolla Cove; Electric Bike and Hike Torrey Pines State Park; La Jolla Shores Coastal Excursion to the Torrey Pines Glider Port and/or State Park; Southern Coastal Ride to the Historic Crystal Pier in Pacific Beach; La Jolla Shores Tour to the Birch Aquarium; and Customize Your Own Tour with the La Jolla Pedego team.  Pedego electric bikes have 250- to 500-watt motors capable of cruising distances up to 60 miles on a single battery charge. Pedego’s high-quality, innovative “pedal or not” models include cruisers, tandems, commuters, fat-tire bikes, mountain bikes, cargo bikes, a trike and a convenient electric folding bike.  Info Box:  San Diego Fly Rides 7444 Girard Ave. 888-821-6827 sandiegoflyrides.com La Jolla Golf Tours 7512 La Jolla Blvd. 858-401-6307 lajollagolfcarts.com Pedego Electric Bikes La Jolla 5702 La Jolla Blvd., Ste. 101a 858-291-8845 pedegoelectricbikes.com
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    Senior Gleaners gather surplus food in San Diego to help feed the hungry
    by LUCIA VITI
    Mar 15, 2019 | 22224 views | 0 0 comments | 9 9 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    A crew of Senior Gleaners working the coast including the Cayetano pick in Mission Beach. / Photo by Daryush Bastani
    A crew of Senior Gleaners working the coast including the Cayetano pick in Mission Beach. / Photo by Daryush Bastani
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    Calling all active seniors in need of productivity and vegetable farmers and homeowners with backyards filled with fruit trees. San Diego’s Senior Gleaners are ready, super excited and able to glean surplus produce in an effort to feed the hungry. Celebrating 25 years as a nonprofit organization, this dedicated group of volunteers collects food that would otherwise be wasted. Members glean surplus produce from farms, fields, groves, and backyards. The group also collects damaged or outdated foods and products donated by grocers, food services, and even restaurants throughout San Diego County. Picking occurs almost every Tuesday morning, year-round. Grocery crews are scheduled four mornings a week to grocery stores the include Windmill Farms, Vons, Ralphs, Keils, even Outback Steakhouse. Crew sizes and detailed surplus varies. The coastal communities of La Jolla, Pacific Beach, Ocean Beach and Point Loma are abundant with produce. “With all of the negativity in today's world, gleaning, a tradition established by landowners who set aside portions of their harvested bounty to feed the poor, is positive and productive,” said Monte Turner, Senior Gleaner board president. “We help to feed the hungry, reduce waste and keep retirees active.” According to Turner, the Senior Gleaners collected more than 280,000 pounds of produce and distributed nearly 252 tons of food in 2018. And yet, San Diego continues to waste 500,000 tons of food annually while 500, 000 people live in poverty or are considered food insecure. “While not starving, many San Diegans don’t know where their next meal is coming from,” he said. “We don’t have a hunger problem, we have a food distribution problem. Rather than compost edible food or fill landfills with what becomes harmful methane gas, it makes more sense to support groups like ours who get food to the people who need it.” Turner spoke of the emotional satisfaction that he gets from gleaning. “I love being outside with friends picking fruit appreciated by people who frequent food pantries,” he said. “People often receive canned goods and unsold grocery food items but rarely fresh fruit. And San Diego is fruit country (oranges, tangerines, lemons, grapefruits, avocados apples, and pears are among the County’s produce surplus). “We often pass trees loaded with fruit and within a few weeks, the fruit is unsightly, rotting on the ground, attracting insects and feeding rats,” he continued. “To date, we’ve collected less than 10 percent of what’s available, leaving huge untapped resources.” Turner noted that it’s now standard practice for nationwide grocery chain stores to connect with groups like the Senior Gleaners to ensure that edible food is feeding the hungry, not landfills. “Food organizations like ours are being tapped into after a recently enacted state law that requires cities and counties to reduce the amount of organic, soon to be toxic material, to be dumped into landfills,” he said. Senior Gleaners supply small distribution groups – those not served by large food banks – which includes churches, senior centers, low-income housing units and food pantries. Volunteers are needed for gleaning and transporting at least 300 pounds of produce to Heaven's Windows, a satellite facility of the San Diego Food Bank and Feeding America. There is no minimum time requirement, however all volunteers must be 55 or older. Donors receive detailed receipts to claim tax deductions. The federal Good Samaritan Food Donation Act protects donors from liability for “damages incurred as the result of illness,” as long as the donor has not “acted with negligence or intentional misconduct.” The Senior Gleaners of San Diego County is a certified non-profit organization affiliated with the San Diego County Office of Aging and Independent Services/ Retired and Senior Volunteer Program, a nationwide program that encourages seniors to serve their community. For more information, visit seniorgleanerssdco.org.
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    91-year-old La Jolla volunteer cleans up Coast Walk’s clutter
    by VICTORIA DAVIS
    Mar 08, 2019 | 32016 views | 3 3 comments | 12 12 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    A new sign has been added to the Coast Walk Trail to educate visitors about the Marine Protected Area. 
DON BALCH / VILLAGE NEWS
    A new sign has been added to the Coast Walk Trail to educate visitors about the Marine Protected Area. DON BALCH / VILLAGE NEWS
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    John Abbe
    John Abbe
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    From repainting railings and benches to removing invasive plant species, Brenda Fake, founder of Friends of Coast Walk, says it has “taken a village” to maintain La Jolla’s beloved Coast Walk Trail. Focusing on the safety and environmental preservation and restoration of the sea-side trail, the nonprofit has partnered with the City of San Diego on a few Coast Walk repairs, but Fake says it’s primarily the informal efforts of community members that has helped Coast Walk to thrive. “If it weren’t for our volunteers, things would not be as cleaned up or as nice as they are along the parks,” said Fake. “These people do this without any acknowledgement, but just with this sincere desire to keep their park clean.” One of Coast Walk Trail’s oldest volunteers is John Abbe, a 91-year-old Casa de Manana Retirement Community resident. With a plastic bag, trash grabber and “clothes I don’t care about ruining” as his equipment, Abbe goes out once a week to pick up the garbage along the trail that hikers leave behind. The avid volunteer also cuts back trail weeds and excess brush in addition to sweeping bench areas. “I like the term ‘volunteer’ because when people see you picking up trash along a road or trail, they think you’re working off a DUI or something,” said Abbe. “Or they think you’re homeless looking for stuff to recycle. I’m neither one of those. This isn’t for my own satisfaction, but to acknowledge that we need people to be more contentious along the coast. La Jolla Village itself has a real problem with littering.” Abbe used to work with the American River Parkway foundation when he and his wife, Carol, lived in Sacramento. He says he has always had an affinity for community service and, after moving to La Jolla two years ago, noticed the Coast Walk Trail’s need for some TLC. “The city does pick up along the areas where there’s access by pick-up truck, but when they get up to the cove here where the trail starts, that’s as far as they go,” said Abbe who has picked up everything from baby shoes to beach towels and even some collapsible chairs. “The Coast Walk Trail itself is not policed by sanitation or pick-up people like it should be.” According to Fake, the Parks and Beaches personnel collect trash at only three places along the half-mile trail: the parking area on Coast Walk, the trail head on Prospect, and at the trail head by the Cave Shop. While Timothy W. Graham, spokesperson for the City of San Diego, says the trash cans at each location are “checked daily and emptied as needed,” there’s about a quarter stretch of trail where littering has not been maintained, until Abbe came along. “John looks after that trail like it’s his own yard,” said Bill Robbins, unofficial “Mayor of The Cove” who is also a retiree and trail clean-up volunteer. “He’s part of my merry band of ‘Litter Gitters.’” In the very beginning, Abbe did an experiment where he put out five white plastic buckets – which he salvaged from the dumpsters in the back on Casa – along the Coast Walk benches as make-shift trash cans. Abbe would come and empty out the buckets every three or four days but recently had to abandon that tactic due to people stealing the buckets. Abbe plans to put the buckets back out on the trail in the summer when foot traffic is at its highest. Though his hope is for the city to eventually take the reins, Abbe sees the immeasurable value in localized efforts. “Government doesn’t always have the money to service all community needs, so they rely heavily on volunteers and nonprofits to fill the gaps,” said Abbe. “This is the final career of my whole life and, believe it or not, I get more job satisfaction from this than any regular jobs I’ve had before.” For those interested in getting involved as volunteers with the Coast Walk Trail, go to friendsofcoastwalk.org.
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    my helper
    |
    March 14, 2019
    After being in relationship with Wilson for seven years,he broke up with me, I did everything possible to bring him back but all was in vain, I wanted him back so much because of the love I have for him, I begged him with everything, I made promises but he refused. I explained my problem to someone online and she suggested that I should contact a spell caster that could help me cast a spell to bring him back but I am the type that don't believed in spell, I had no choice than to try it, I meant a spell caster called Dr AKHERE and I email him, and he told me there was no problem that everything will be okay before three days, that my ex will return to me before three days, he cast the spell and surprisingly in the second day, it was around 4pm. My ex called me, I was so surprised, I answered the call and all he said was that he was so sorry for everything that happened, that he wanted me to return to him, that he loves me so much. I was so happy and went to him, that was how we started living together happily again. Since then, I have made promise that anybody I know that have a relationship problem, I would be of help to such person by referring him or her to the only real and powerful spell caster who helped me with my own problem and who is different from all the fake ones out there. Anybody could need the help of the spell caster, his email: AKHERETEMPLE@gmail.com

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    Beteur Dawler
    |
    March 09, 2019
    Thank you John Abbe for the volunteer work you do to keep the trail safe and clean. You are a very good role model and I hope others are inspired by your work and message to volunteer where-ever their hearts lead them.
    anna lucas
    |
    March 08, 2019
    Hello viewer’s

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    Seadragons & Seahorses exhibition at Birch Aquarium to open in May
    Mar 07, 2019 | 10528 views | 0 0 comments | 20 20 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Leafy Seadragon
    Leafy Seadragon
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    On Friday, May 17, Birch Aquarium at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego will open Seadragons & Seahorses, a new permanent exhibition that celebrates the care and conservation of these unique creatures.  Seadragons & Seahorses is the largest indoor aquarium addition since the aquarium’s opening in 1992 and will be home to Weedy and Leafy Seadragons, as well as several species of seahorses and pipefish.  The centerpiece of the exhibition will be one of the largest seadragon habitats in the world. The 18-foot-wide, 9-foot-tall exhibit will hold 5,375 gallons of water – that’s equivalent to 70 bathtubs. More than being a stunning display, the habitat has been designed to create an ideal environment to breed seadragons. Birch Aquarium hopes to be the first aquarium to successfully breed Leafy Seadragons in captivity.   “People love ocean animals, especially seadragons and seahorses. We invite our guests to draw closer to these wondrous fish, to appreciate their amazing qualities and their value as part of our natural world,” said Nan Renner, the aquarium’s senior director of learning design and innovation. Seadragons & Seahorses will immerse aquarium guests into the underwater lives of seahorses and seadragons, while giving  a peek into the work Birch Aquarium’s renowned Husbandry Team is doing to ensure that these species survive into the future.  Dappled light, dramatic photography, and larger-than-life imagery set the scene as guests learn how to observe these animals the way scientists do: by noticing the unique features that distinguish individual animals and identifying courtship and mating behaviors that will make our breeding program a success. “Birch Aquarium’s husbandry team has been committed to breeding seahorses and seadragons for 25 years,” said Jennifer Nero Moffatt, the aquarium’s senior director of animal care, science and conservation. “Seahorses and seadragons alike are threatened by human impact in the wild and our conservation program aims to relieve pressures, provide sanctuary and promote research of wild and captive animals to help conserve these charismatic creatures.” The propagation of these species is increasingly vital due to human impacts and climate change’s warming oceans. Joining their partners in the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA), Birch Aquarium’s seahorse and seadragon conservation efforts support Species Survival Plans (SSP), cooperatively managed programs that oversee the population management of select species within AZA member institutions and enhance conservation of species in the wild. Each SSP Program coordinates the individual activities of participating member institutions through a variety of species conservation, research, husbandry, management, and educational initiatives. This exhibition is made possible through generous donations from the community. If you are interested in learning more or supporting Birch Aquarium’s groundbreaking seadragon exhibition, contact John Matthews at j5matthews@ucsd.edu or 858-822-5803.
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    La Jolla author and photographer releases book about bicycle trip across Route 66 with son
    by EMILY BLACKWOOD
    Mar 05, 2019 | 15324 views | 0 0 comments | 18 18 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Quincy and Christopher Briscoe

Photo by Christopher Briscoe
    Quincy and Christopher Briscoe Photo by Christopher Briscoe
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    Christopher Briscoe is no stranger to cross-country bike rides. In fact, he had ridden the over 4,000 miles from sea-to-sea three times before his son Quincy asked him to do it once more. 
     
    “[Quincy] went from Alaska and bicycled all the way down to Tijuana,” Briscoe said. “Then he came to me and said, ‘Dad, we got to do this together.’ In between the lines he was really saying ‘before it’s too late.’”
     
    At first, Briscoe was hesitant. He worried that he was “too old and too fat” to complete the trip a fourth time, let alone keep up with his 23-year-old son. But a test drive riding an electric assist bike was enough to change his mind. 
     
    “It’s like having a personal tailwind,” he said. “That narrowed the fitness gap between the 23-year-old macho kid and the AARP guy. So at the end of the day, we were equally exhausted. It was the perfect technology at the perfect time."
     
    So in 2016, they packed their bikes and set off from Santa Monica on what would be a 58-day, 2,700-mile trip along Route 66 to Chicago. Together they shared a meal with fourth-generation farmers, survived the Midwest’s humidity (“like breathing through a wet washcloth,” Briscoe says), mailed some treasures home that seemed like great ideas at the time. 
     
    “Quincy was going to learn how to play the ukulele,” Briscoe chuckled. “That never happened.”
     
    During their cross-country trek, the La Jolla photographer and author took notes and portraits of the places they rode through and all the people they met. When they returned, he compiled it all into a book called "The Road Between Us: A Father & Son Bicycle Route 66,” which was later turned into a short film and even won an award at the 2018 Filmed By Bike festival in Portland. Briscoe said that no matter how people hear of their story, the reaction is usually the same. 
     
    “So many people said and continue to say, ‘I wish I had done that with my kid’ or ‘I wish I could do that with my dad,’” he said. “That’s a big deal because so many kids have problems with their parents, and all it takes is one memory like that to kind of reshape that dialogue and that relationship.
     
    “It’s something kids talk about forever. I know Quincy is going to talk about it forever, and I know I do every chance I get. But it’s never too late to do something like this.”
     
    And for Briscoe, it’s never too late to do something like this — again. 
     
    This June, he and Quincy will be setting sail to Hawaii and back, which he plans to turn into a book and short film titled, “The Wind Between.” To follow Briscoe and Quincy along on their adventures, follow him on Instagram at @chrisbriscoe. To learn more about the book “The Road Between Us,” visit shiftinggearspub.com.
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    News
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