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    High surf advisory affects coastal communities in San Diego
    Jan 18, 2018 | 21495 views | 0 0 comments | 9 9 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Kylie Dixon, of Clairemont, checks out a huge wave splashing over a cliff near The Arch at Sunset Cliffs in Point Loma on Thursday, Jan. 18. Dixon, a Mesa College student, was celebrating her birthday with a walk at Sunset Cliffs. THOMAS MELVILLE / PENINSULA BEACON
    Kylie Dixon, of Clairemont, checks out a huge wave splashing over a cliff near The Arch at Sunset Cliffs in Point Loma on Thursday, Jan. 18. Dixon, a Mesa College student, was celebrating her birthday with a walk at Sunset Cliffs. THOMAS MELVILLE / PENINSULA BEACON
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    A huge wave cashes into Sunset Cliffs on Thursday, Jan. 18. THOMAS MELVILLE / PENINSULA BEACON
    A huge wave cashes into Sunset Cliffs on Thursday, Jan. 18. THOMAS MELVILLE / PENINSULA BEACON
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    Two young women enjoy the sun and watch the huge surf rolling in at Sunset Cliffs in Point Loma on Thursday, Jan. 18. THOMAS MELVILLE / PENINSULA BEACON
    Two young women enjoy the sun and watch the huge surf rolling in at Sunset Cliffs in Point Loma on Thursday, Jan. 18. THOMAS MELVILLE / PENINSULA BEACON
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    Max, visiting from Sweden, gets walloped by a massive wave while trying to enter the ocean to surf at Sunset Cliffs in Point Loma on Jan. 18. THOMAS MELVILLE / PENINSULA BEACON
    Max, visiting from Sweden, gets walloped by a massive wave while trying to enter the ocean to surf at Sunset Cliffs in Point Loma on Jan. 18. THOMAS MELVILLE / PENINSULA BEACON
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    Max, visiting from Sweden, jumps into the ocean to surf at Sunset Cliffs in Point Loma on Jan. 18. THOMAS MELVILLE / PENINSULA BEACON
    Max, visiting from Sweden, jumps into the ocean to surf at Sunset Cliffs in Point Loma on Jan. 18. THOMAS MELVILLE / PENINSULA BEACON
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    Kylie Dixon, of Clairemont, watched a giant wave splash near The Arch at Sunset Cliffs in Point Loma on Jan. 18. THOMAS MELVILLE / PENINSULA BEACON
    Kylie Dixon, of Clairemont, watched a giant wave splash near The Arch at Sunset Cliffs in Point Loma on Jan. 18. THOMAS MELVILLE / PENINSULA BEACON
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    Visitors dodge a massive wave crashing into Sunset Cliffs on Thursday, Jan. 18. THOMAS MELVILLE / PENINSULA BEACON
    Visitors dodge a massive wave crashing into Sunset Cliffs on Thursday, Jan. 18. THOMAS MELVILLE / PENINSULA BEACON
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    A surfer is swamped by a huge wave as he tries to enter the ocean at Garbage Beach at Sunset Cliffs on Jan. 18. THOMAS MELVILLE / PENINSULA BEACON
    A surfer is swamped by a huge wave as he tries to enter the ocean at Garbage Beach at Sunset Cliffs on Jan. 18. THOMAS MELVILLE / PENINSULA BEACON
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    A large northwest swell producing large surf will fade into the late afternoon on Thursday, Jan. 18. A new northwest swell will increase the surf again Thursday night, peak Friday, and then gradually diminish late Saturday. Surf will will reach 7 feet high Thursday. Then on Friday, waves will be 5-10 feet high with sets up to 12 feet high through evening. On Saturday, waves will be 4-8 feet high with sets to 10 feet high. The highest surf will occur in southern San Diego County and northern Orange County. A high surf advisory means that high surf will affect beaches in the advisory area, producing rip currents, beach erosion and dangerous swimming conditions. Expect waves overtopping jetties and coastal rocks as well as sneaker waves. There may be some minor coastal flooding during high tides.
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    New study to evaluate airplane flight paths and noise in coastal neighborhoods
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Jan 17, 2018 | 9095 views | 1 1 comments | 9 9 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    This composite photo shows dozens of planes taking off from San Diego International Airport and headed over Point Loma. A new study will evaluate how flight paths and noise impacts Peninsula neighborhoods.   OLIVER ASIS / CONTRIBUTOR
    This composite photo shows dozens of planes taking off from San Diego International Airport and headed over Point Loma. A new study will evaluate how flight paths and noise impacts Peninsula neighborhoods. OLIVER ASIS / CONTRIBUTOR
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    A new study titled “Part 150” has been green lighted to evaluate flight-path improvements and noise reductions in and around San Diego International Airport. Noise has been a real sore spot for coastal residents from the Point to La Jolla, who allege flight-path changes the past couple years have negatively impacted their lifestyles. Recently, District 2 Councilmember Lorie Zapf spoke before the Airport Authority on the  merits of the Part 150 study. “As your council member, I have advocated for reduction in airport noise in our communities,” Zapf said. “As part of my support for the Part 150 study, I have requested the FAA be a proactive partner to improve the quality of life in surrounding communities.” Part 150, a federal aviation regulation, guides and controls planning for aviation noise compatibility on and around airports. The federal regulation establishes procedures, standards and methodologies to be used by airport operators for preparation of Airport Noise Exposure Maps.  Such exposure maps are used in the Quieter Home Program, the San Diego County Regional Airport Authority’s Residential Sound Insulation Program. The FAA has determined that residences within the 65-plus decibel-level limit around SDIA may be eligible for sound-insulation treatments to mitigate aircraft noise. The FAA has set a goal of reducing interior-noise levels for eligible residents by at least five decibels inside the home, providing a noticeable noise reduction. But not everyone is certain the Part 150 study will be a cure-all for decreasing airport noise in communities directly impacted from alleged flight-path changes. One skeptic is Gary Wonacott, Mission Beach Town Council president. “Clearly, the FAA modifications benefitted some areas of Mission Beach, mainly the north, and negatively impacted South Mission Beach,” Wonacott said. “According to responses from residents in PB and La Jolla, they were also negatively impacted by some of the flight path changes. “The key point here is that Part 150 cannot be used to assess the benefits of the procedural changes proposed for Mission Beach and La Jolla, because these communities are not in the 65-decibel area. As you know, currently, the majority of our noise complaints come outside our 65-decibel contour,” Wonacott said. Wonacott admitted, however, the FAA is showing a willingness to compromise. “The FAA has demonstrated that they are willing to look at procedural changes that reduce noise outside the 65 decibel limit,” he said. Point Loman Casey Schnoor has been a watchdog for the NextGen and airport noise situation for more than two years. A citizen’s representative on a 15-member airport subcommittee, Schnoor and his colleagues came up with 21 recommendations for “quieting” airport noise in coastal communities in the airport’s flight path, following a year of deliberations. Schnoor talked about the goal of those 21 recommendations. “The goal is to mitigate the impacts to the communities of any of those flight paths, or adjacent to those flight paths,” he said. Is the Part 150 a step in the right direction? “I am cautiously optimistic,” Schnoor replied. “Part 150 is a process. It appears to be the best vehicle to execute all those [recommended] changes.” Schnoor noted Part 150 is an 18- to 24-month process. “We don’t want to sit on our hands for two years, when a lot of these things are problems today,” Schnoor said, adding, it’s also important to continue monitoring “day-to-day issues and procedures” with airport operations. That needs to be done, he said, to hold the federal agency accountable for its operations, and to ensure the Airport Authority remains responsive to citizens’ concerns and complaints about aircraft noise. Schnoor said the airport points to noise issues remaining relatively stable the past couple years. But he’s quick to caution: “You need to look at the multi-year picture, year over year. At a quick glance (at recent data), nothing has changed. But if you go back to 2014 and see the data on missed approaches, early turns, curfew violations, etc. you’ll see where the current figures have come down from.”
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    casey schnoor
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    January 18, 2018
    Mr. Schwab,

    Thank you for your informative reporting in this week’s Beach and Bay related publications as well as making time for our conversation last week.

    However, I would like to point out two areas of important clarification:

    1) As part of our conversation as well as the written information I provided to you last week, I was focused upon the very important community expectation that a FAA 7100.41a (“41a”) analysis is to be conducted “in conjunction with” and “in concert with” the Part 150 study. The importance of the concurrent 41a study was also emphasized by members of the SDCRAA Board of Directors during their discussion to approve the Part 150 process on December 7th. This very important link was missing from your article.

    In sum, SDCRAA has provided the community with their assurances that in their discussions with FAA, FAA has stated their willingness to do a concurrant 41a. This is most important as there is a critical nexus between the two efforts in that the 41a may be required by FAA to execute on many of the route revisions, as requested within the subcommittee list. Therefore, to avoid further delays to the study, the 41a study needs to be initiated concurrant with the Part 150 as it is a is critical componet for the timely success of the Part 150 process. Please note however that commencing the 41a process is at the sole discretion of the FAA and therefore it is a key element that the community has been and will continue to press SDCRAA to firm up with FAA, beyond their current “assurances”.

    2) In quoting me, “You need to look at the multi-year picture, year over year. At a quick glance (at recent the data), nothing has changed. But if you go back to 2014 and see the data on missed approaches, early turns, curfew violations, etc. you’ll see where the current figures have come down from.”

    The key context that is missing from this quote is that when looking at year over year data, each of the various violations tracked spiked significantly up during or after 2014 to never before reached peaks, so that “where the current figures have come down from” …. must be compared to 2014 and before to see that these violation events, while at or in some cases below their peaks, still remain well above 2014 and years prior. Further, these are “day to day” matters that are under the direct day to day control of FAA’s Air Traffic Control (“ATC”) located adjacent to Miramar Air Station and, while inclusive within the 21 subcommittee recommendations to explored within the Part 150, they can be directly addressed by ATC today, not after the lengthy Part 150 process.

    These are both very important elements of the communities poisiton. As such, your further clarifiacation and amplication of these points would be greatly appreciated.

    Should you need further clarificaiton, I would be more than happy to assist as needed to promote these key points.

    Sincerely,

    R. Casey Schnoor

    Recreational marijuana legalized: District 1 dispensary in spotlight
    by BLAKE BUNCH
    Jan 12, 2018 | 15537 views | 0 0 comments | 12 12 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Torrey Holistics, like many dispensaries across the state, offers a wide variety of marijuana products. (Above) Three types of flower strains. / PHOTOS BY BLAKE BUNCH
    Torrey Holistics, like many dispensaries across the state, offers a wide variety of marijuana products. (Above) Three types of flower strains. / PHOTOS BY BLAKE BUNCH
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    A customer narrows down their selection with help from a Torrey Holistics cannabis consultant. It should be noted that any adult (over 21) should not drive any vehicle after ingesting marijuana.
    A customer narrows down their selection with help from a Torrey Holistics cannabis consultant. It should be noted that any adult (over 21) should not drive any vehicle after ingesting marijuana.
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    It’s been more than twenty years since California passed SB420, which “clarified the scope and application of California Proposition 215,” legalizing marijuana use for medical purposes. While Jan. 1 marked the first available sales date for recreational use throughout the state, some local municipalities prohibit recreational pot shops within their confines. District 1 (La Jolla), however, has more or less welcomed the decision. The New Year ushered in throngs of customers to pre-established dispensaries throughout San Diego County. One, in particular, Torrey Holistics, is the only licensed location to operate within District 1. On Friday, Dec. 15, Torrey Holistics became the first approved “adult use” marijuana dispensary in the state of California. They are now legally permitted to sell marijuana to adults 21 years of age and over without the medical recommendation of a physician, as was previously required in California. Although Torrey Holistics has been operational since 2015, providing marijuana to patients with a medical recommendation, they have since transitioned to purvey both recreational and medical cannabis products (in separated groups). Unsurprisingly, on New Year’s Day, a queue of customers stretched down the block. “There were still people when I left the store earlier, so here we are, in the second week, and are still seeing large numbers of customers,” said Ruthie Edelson, marketing director of Torrey Holistics. “I definitely think our customer contingency will continue to grow. Everyone has seemed happy with everything thus far. Perhaps the only negative response I have heard is in regard to taxes.” What Edelson is referring to is the $3.88 plus 7.75 percent local sales tax added to flat-rate product costs. Projections show that in 2018, a 15 percent excise tax and $1.15 state cultivation tax will also be added. Disregarding taxes, clients at Torrey Holistics seemed to be in good spirits. “Our buyer was extremely prepared, so we did not run out of any product on ‘opening day,’” added Edelson. The ruling to allow recreational marijuana testing labs, large-scale cultivation, production and distribution within San Diego County passed 6-3 in a Sep. 11, 2016 vote. Councilmembers Chris Cate, Lorie Zapf, and Scott Sherman voted against the option. While Zapf and Bry have typically co-authored legislative work in the past, Bry, who represents District 1, ultimately voted in favor of the option, saying: “By allowing for local government oversight of the cannabis industry, we can benefit from new jobs and a new source of much-needed tax revenue for the general fund. “San Diego voters overwhelmingly turned out to pass Proposition 64 and it is our responsibility to put reasonable regulations in place that protect public safety and enhance our local economy. If we don’t allow all parts of the supply chain in San Diego, we are merely enabling a large black market and San Diego consumers are counting on us to provide them with a safe product.” Not everyone is on board with the recent decision, most notably U.S. Attorney General, Jeff Sessions. Sessions is quoted as saying, “No good people smoke pot,” and has vowed to utilize federal resources to “harass and otherwise circumvent the will of the people in California.” It is also no secret that District 2 representative, Lorie Zapf, has expressed her opinion that moving forward with that recreational pot would be disastrous for teenagers in her district (or any). At the public meeting of City Council, in open comment session on Sep. 11 and 12, 2017, Zapf cited a Daily Mail article,“Proof Cannabis Does Lead Teens to Harder Drugs,” after scolding District 3 Councilmember Chris Ward for “reading headlines” in support of moving forward with the options presented before them. Despite those in opposition, a majority vote allowed this to happen in the county, so it will be interesting to see where things expand from this point forward.
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    Tiger Woods commits to 2018 Farmers Insurance Open
    Jan 04, 2018 | 30182 views | 0 0 comments | 16 16 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Seven-time champion, Tiger Woods, will make his 2018 debut at Torrey Pines, joining a strong field that includes Jon Rahm, Justin Rose, Phil Mickelson, Rickie Fowler and many more. The Farmers Insurance Open will be played Jan. 25-28 at historic Torrey Pines Golf Course, host site of the 2008 and 2021 U.S. Opens. With defending champion Jon Rahm, the Farmers Insurance Open consistently attracts a world-class field, including other past winners such as Phil Mickelson (three-time winner), Jason Day, Bubba Watson and seven-time champion Woods. This is the 66th year that a PGA TOUR event has been held in San Diego, beginning with the San Diego Open in 1952. The 2018 tournament also marks the event’s 67th year and the ninth year of Farmers Insurance sponsorship of the tournament. Woods won the Farmers Insurance Open in 1999, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008 and 2013, and earned his most recent major championship victory in a 19-hole playoff at the U.S. Open at Torrey Pines in 2008. In addition to his seven victories at the Farmers Insurance Open, the 79-time PGA Tour winner has finished in the top 10 six other times in 15 appearances. He is the tournament’s all-time leading money winner, with $6.85 million to date. “Tiger shares a rich history with Torrey Pines Golf Course, and with The Farmers Insurance Open, in particular. We are excited to have him join our field once again, alongside some of the game’s greats,” said The Century Club of San Diego CEO, Peter Ripa. “His legacy already cemented, we look forward to, together with our fans, watching as Tiger writes the latest chapter of his storied career.” Woods returned to competitive golf at December’s Hero World Challenge after missing 10 months due to a fourth back surgery and finished tied for ninth in the limited-field event. “I was good with my irons, I drove it pretty good all week, and made some good putts,” Woods said after the tournament. “Overall I'm very pleased. I showed some good signs, I hit some really good shots out there and (think there’s) a bright future. Woods joins a stellar list of early commitments that includes defending tournament champion and World No. 4 Jon Rahm, No. 5 Hideki Matsuyama, No. 6 Rose, No. 7 Fowler and three-time Farmers Insurance Open Champion Mickelson. The field is not final until the commitment deadline on Friday, Jan. 19 at 5 p.m. EST. Among the early commitments are a group of players with San Diego ties, including Poway High School alum and four-time PGA winner Charley Hoffman as well as San Diego State University alumni J.J. Spaun and Xander Schauffele, who won the 2017 FedExCup playoffs-ending TOUR Championship and was awarded the PGA Tour’s 2017 Rookie of the Year honor earlier this year. In addition to attracting some of the biggest names in the sport, the Farmers Insurance Open will also feature an array of specialty food and drink offerings showcasing the San Diego flavor and venues to entertain the 100,000-plus spectators who attend the four-day tournament. New areas open to the public include an expanded Grey Goose 19th Hole, which will feature an all-new elevated viewing deck that provides panoramic views of the course, a Pétanque course and specialty drinks including the 2018 signature cocktail called, the “Torrey Breeze.” Other public areas of interest include the William Hill Estate Wine Lounge, which offers views alongside par-3 8th green; and the Michelob Ultra Zone, where fans can enjoy happy-hour specials starting at 3 p.m. Thursday through Saturday, and a DJ as part of the Post Party presented by Harrah’s Resort SoCal. Tickets for the Farmers Insurance Open are now on sale and can be purchased at FarmersInsuranceOpen.com. Adult grounds tickets cost $50, with upgraded VIP tickets starting at $85. Discounted tickets are available for seniors, veterans, and youth (aged 13 to 17). Tickets are complimentary for active-duty military, reservists, retired military and dependents, and for children 12 and under.
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    Kitten Kindergarten helps felines and parents bond at San Diego Humane Society
    by LUCIA VITI
    Dec 26, 2017 | 62953 views | 1 1 comments | 15 15 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Huckleberry
    Huckleberry
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    Kitten training.
    Kitten training.
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    Kirk
    Kirk
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    Lola and Gaga
    Lola and Gaga
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    Hail kitten graduates! The San Diego Humane Society lauds the alumnae of Kitten Kindergarten, a training course for our beloved four-legged felines. Offered to kittens between 7 and 13 weeks old by the first session, Kitten Kindergarten recently opened kitty doors in three, one-hour sessions. Classes were celebrated as a “huge success” by its two-legged and four-legged participants. And, according SDHS’s Kitten Kindergarten’s designer/trainer Allison Beaulieu, CPDT – KA, and community training coordinator, Shauna Romero, CPDT – KA, classes were “so much fun!” Kittens – and their owners – learned the nuances of kittenhood during a “critical development period when open and receptive to learning.” Exposed to everything new – environments, people, fellow felines, toys, and sounds, kittens practiced the etiquette of socializing – a.k.a kitten recess – carrier desensitization, comfort with DVM visits, leash and harness training, grooming care and tricks. “Owners are often surprised at how trainable kittens can be,” said Beaulieu. “We often see the hand to the forehead moment, ‘Of course they can do this!’ A kitten’s socialization window – that open spongy period – is short. Once that window shuts, issues can come up.” The San Diego Humane Society (SDHS) utilizes only positive methods and tools, sidestepping aversive training for all animal instruction. Clicker training and food – both kitten and baby – along with tuna and cream cheese is used to reward and entice kittens to become affable cats. According to Romero, adult cats can be finicky when introduced to a new environment, making learning difficult. Kittens adapt better. "Kittens adapt to changes and learn new environments with less stress and fear than adult cats,” she said. “Kitten Kindergarten reviewed basic handling, manners and obedience.” “Cats tend to freak out when removed from their environment,” added Beaulieu. “They lose focus. They investigate the perimeter. They often won’t eat in a new space. They’re more comfortable in a colony, a group setting of cats. Clicker training works especially well with shy cats. Even the most suspicious cats watch the action and slowly come out of hiding. The idea that cars are aloof, non-social creatures isn’t true. Cats are social.” Kittens also learned that carriers aren’t scary. Carriers cause most cats to hide. The SDHS sent “students” a video prior to class that demonstrated how to invite cats to be comfortable in carriers. Often earmarked as a trip to the vet, carriers cause stress, “something we work to change” because of the importance of using them for natural disasters. Desensitized, crates become a wonderful place to go. Romero described the training room as a novel environment for even the shy or timid cat who’s never stepped out of the house. Kittens were set up in their own x-pen or pod. “Stepping away from its environment can be scary for a cat,” she said. “But all of our kittens – even those up for adoption – do really well. Kitten Kindergarten’s shy ones explored and played with new objects by the final session. We also taught owners how to exhaust energetic cats by refocusing their energy. Every owner appreciates a peaceful night’s sleep without a cat running around.” Romero and Beaulieu both agree that cats are stigmatized for their independent nature. Often left alone, owners assume their “personality is their personality” with no understanding of how to “handle and socialize kittens and cats to experience new sights and sounds to shape a well-balanced cat.” “Shaping behavior with tiny steps, we proactively work to prevent fear, anxiety or stress in kittens,” said Beaulieu. “Classes build from each other. Through the art of positive reinforcement and clicker training, owners realize that if willing, they can train their felines to do so much more. Kitten Kindergarten also introduced cat body language. Owners learned why cats behave and react to people and stimulus. We worked to increase the bond between cats and their humans.” Training included sitting, high fives, follow the target, lie down on your mat, come, off high counters, grooming – including the brushing of teeth and the use of kitty litters, carrier comfort and no stress DVM visits. “By pairing potentially scary things with treats, kittens associate scary isn’t so scary anymore,” continued Beaulieu. “A day at the veterinarian is a perfect example. Kittens learned to become comfortable being handled for weighing, restrained for vaccines, and checked – eyes ears, and nails.” Cats were also introduced to leash and harness training to underscore that felines can be safely walked outdoors. “Kittens are adorable, just adorable,” concluded Beaulieu. “Kitten Kindergarten was the highlight of my week. It was difficult not to get sucked into playing with kittens for the hour. Those who judge cats to be anything but great fun, haven’t met enough cats!” Additional classes will be scheduled as per “public interests.” Classes are not suggested for feral kittens or kittens who growl, snap, bite, exhibit fear or severe behavioral problems. Kittens too shy or too old for class can send their humans as auditors at a discounted rate. Auditors can watch, learn, ask questions and practice at home. Kitten Kindergarten is held at the SDHS San Diego Campus located on Gaines Street. Enrollment is limited to six kittens per class. Humans are required to prove at least one set of vaccines, a deworming, plus a negative result for an FELV prior to the first class. Those kittens showing signs of diarrhea, sneezing, congestion, and missing hair will not be allowed to participate. SDHS reserves the right to turn any kittens they deem unhealthy. Class participation is based on their own risk. Animals adopted from SDH will receive a 20 percent discount. Classes will be held indoors at the Gaines Street campus.
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    caroline790
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    January 19, 2018
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