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    Recreational marijuana legalized: District 1 dispensary in spotlight
    by BLAKE BUNCH
    Jan 12, 2018 | 12651 views | 0 0 comments | 9 9 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Torrey Holistics, like many dispensaries across the state, offers a wide variety of marijuana products. (Above) Three types of flower strains. / PHOTOS BY BLAKE BUNCH
    Torrey Holistics, like many dispensaries across the state, offers a wide variety of marijuana products. (Above) Three types of flower strains. / PHOTOS BY BLAKE BUNCH
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    A customer narrows down their selection with help from a Torrey Holistics cannabis consultant. It should be noted that any adult (over 21) should not drive any vehicle after ingesting marijuana.
    A customer narrows down their selection with help from a Torrey Holistics cannabis consultant. It should be noted that any adult (over 21) should not drive any vehicle after ingesting marijuana.
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    It’s been more than twenty years since California passed SB420, which “clarified the scope and application of California Proposition 215,” legalizing marijuana use for medical purposes. While Jan. 1 marked the first available sales date for recreational use throughout the state, some local municipalities prohibit recreational pot shops within their confines. District 1 (La Jolla), however, has more or less welcomed the decision. The New Year ushered in throngs of customers to pre-established dispensaries throughout San Diego County. One, in particular, Torrey Holistics, is the only licensed location to operate within District 1. On Friday, Dec. 15, Torrey Holistics became the first approved “adult use” marijuana dispensary in the state of California. They are now legally permitted to sell marijuana to adults 21 years of age and over without the medical recommendation of a physician, as was previously required in California. Although Torrey Holistics has been operational since 2015, providing marijuana to patients with a medical recommendation, they have since transitioned to purvey both recreational and medical cannabis products (in separated groups). Unsurprisingly, on New Year’s Day, a queue of customers stretched down the block. “There were still people when I left the store earlier, so here we are, in the second week, and are still seeing large numbers of customers,” said Ruthie Edelson, marketing director of Torrey Holistics. “I definitely think our customer contingency will continue to grow. Everyone has seemed happy with everything thus far. Perhaps the only negative response I have heard is in regard to taxes.” What Edelson is referring to is the $3.88 plus 7.75 percent local sales tax added to flat-rate product costs. Projections show that in 2018, a 15 percent excise tax and $1.15 state cultivation tax will also be added. Disregarding taxes, clients at Torrey Holistics seemed to be in good spirits. “Our buyer was extremely prepared, so we did not run out of any product on ‘opening day,’” added Edelson. The ruling to allow recreational marijuana testing labs, large-scale cultivation, production and distribution within San Diego County passed 6-3 in a Sep. 11, 2016 vote. Councilmembers Chris Cate, Lorie Zapf, and Scott Sherman voted against the option. While Zapf and Bry have typically co-authored legislative work in the past, Bry, who represents District 1, ultimately voted in favor of the option, saying: “By allowing for local government oversight of the cannabis industry, we can benefit from new jobs and a new source of much-needed tax revenue for the general fund. “San Diego voters overwhelmingly turned out to pass Proposition 64 and it is our responsibility to put reasonable regulations in place that protect public safety and enhance our local economy. If we don’t allow all parts of the supply chain in San Diego, we are merely enabling a large black market and San Diego consumers are counting on us to provide them with a safe product.” Not everyone is on board with the recent decision, most notably U.S. Attorney General, Jeff Sessions. Sessions is quoted as saying, “No good people smoke pot,” and has vowed to utilize federal resources to “harass and otherwise circumvent the will of the people in California.” It is also no secret that District 2 representative, Lorie Zapf, has expressed her opinion that moving forward with that recreational pot would be disastrous for teenagers in her district (or any). At the public meeting of City Council, in open comment session on Sep. 11 and 12, 2017, Zapf cited a Daily Mail article,“Proof Cannabis Does Lead Teens to Harder Drugs,” after scolding District 3 Councilmember Chris Ward for “reading headlines” in support of moving forward with the options presented before them. Despite those in opposition, a majority vote allowed this to happen in the county, so it will be interesting to see where things expand from this point forward.
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    Tiger Woods commits to 2018 Farmers Insurance Open
    Jan 04, 2018 | 29143 views | 0 0 comments | 12 12 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Seven-time champion, Tiger Woods, will make his 2018 debut at Torrey Pines, joining a strong field that includes Jon Rahm, Justin Rose, Phil Mickelson, Rickie Fowler and many more. The Farmers Insurance Open will be played Jan. 25-28 at historic Torrey Pines Golf Course, host site of the 2008 and 2021 U.S. Opens. With defending champion Jon Rahm, the Farmers Insurance Open consistently attracts a world-class field, including other past winners such as Phil Mickelson (three-time winner), Jason Day, Bubba Watson and seven-time champion Woods. This is the 66th year that a PGA TOUR event has been held in San Diego, beginning with the San Diego Open in 1952. The 2018 tournament also marks the event’s 67th year and the ninth year of Farmers Insurance sponsorship of the tournament. Woods won the Farmers Insurance Open in 1999, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008 and 2013, and earned his most recent major championship victory in a 19-hole playoff at the U.S. Open at Torrey Pines in 2008. In addition to his seven victories at the Farmers Insurance Open, the 79-time PGA Tour winner has finished in the top 10 six other times in 15 appearances. He is the tournament’s all-time leading money winner, with $6.85 million to date. “Tiger shares a rich history with Torrey Pines Golf Course, and with The Farmers Insurance Open, in particular. We are excited to have him join our field once again, alongside some of the game’s greats,” said The Century Club of San Diego CEO, Peter Ripa. “His legacy already cemented, we look forward to, together with our fans, watching as Tiger writes the latest chapter of his storied career.” Woods returned to competitive golf at December’s Hero World Challenge after missing 10 months due to a fourth back surgery and finished tied for ninth in the limited-field event. “I was good with my irons, I drove it pretty good all week, and made some good putts,” Woods said after the tournament. “Overall I'm very pleased. I showed some good signs, I hit some really good shots out there and (think there’s) a bright future. Woods joins a stellar list of early commitments that includes defending tournament champion and World No. 4 Jon Rahm, No. 5 Hideki Matsuyama, No. 6 Rose, No. 7 Fowler and three-time Farmers Insurance Open Champion Mickelson. The field is not final until the commitment deadline on Friday, Jan. 19 at 5 p.m. EST. Among the early commitments are a group of players with San Diego ties, including Poway High School alum and four-time PGA winner Charley Hoffman as well as San Diego State University alumni J.J. Spaun and Xander Schauffele, who won the 2017 FedExCup playoffs-ending TOUR Championship and was awarded the PGA Tour’s 2017 Rookie of the Year honor earlier this year. In addition to attracting some of the biggest names in the sport, the Farmers Insurance Open will also feature an array of specialty food and drink offerings showcasing the San Diego flavor and venues to entertain the 100,000-plus spectators who attend the four-day tournament. New areas open to the public include an expanded Grey Goose 19th Hole, which will feature an all-new elevated viewing deck that provides panoramic views of the course, a Pétanque course and specialty drinks including the 2018 signature cocktail called, the “Torrey Breeze.” Other public areas of interest include the William Hill Estate Wine Lounge, which offers views alongside par-3 8th green; and the Michelob Ultra Zone, where fans can enjoy happy-hour specials starting at 3 p.m. Thursday through Saturday, and a DJ as part of the Post Party presented by Harrah’s Resort SoCal. Tickets for the Farmers Insurance Open are now on sale and can be purchased at FarmersInsuranceOpen.com. Adult grounds tickets cost $50, with upgraded VIP tickets starting at $85. Discounted tickets are available for seniors, veterans, and youth (aged 13 to 17). Tickets are complimentary for active-duty military, reservists, retired military and dependents, and for children 12 and under.
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    Kitten Kindergarten helps felines and parents bond at San Diego Humane Society
    by LUCIA VITI
    Dec 26, 2017 | 62754 views | 0 0 comments | 8 8 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Huckleberry
    Huckleberry
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    Kitten training.
    Kitten training.
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    Kirk
    Kirk
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    Lola and Gaga
    Lola and Gaga
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    Hail kitten graduates! The San Diego Humane Society lauds the alumnae of Kitten Kindergarten, a training course for our beloved four-legged felines. Offered to kittens between 7 and 13 weeks old by the first session, Kitten Kindergarten recently opened kitty doors in three, one-hour sessions. Classes were celebrated as a “huge success” by its two-legged and four-legged participants. And, according SDHS’s Kitten Kindergarten’s designer/trainer Allison Beaulieu, CPDT – KA, and community training coordinator, Shauna Romero, CPDT – KA, classes were “so much fun!” Kittens – and their owners – learned the nuances of kittenhood during a “critical development period when open and receptive to learning.” Exposed to everything new – environments, people, fellow felines, toys, and sounds, kittens practiced the etiquette of socializing – a.k.a kitten recess – carrier desensitization, comfort with DVM visits, leash and harness training, grooming care and tricks. “Owners are often surprised at how trainable kittens can be,” said Beaulieu. “We often see the hand to the forehead moment, ‘Of course they can do this!’ A kitten’s socialization window – that open spongy period – is short. Once that window shuts, issues can come up.” The San Diego Humane Society (SDHS) utilizes only positive methods and tools, sidestepping aversive training for all animal instruction. Clicker training and food – both kitten and baby – along with tuna and cream cheese is used to reward and entice kittens to become affable cats. According to Romero, adult cats can be finicky when introduced to a new environment, making learning difficult. Kittens adapt better. "Kittens adapt to changes and learn new environments with less stress and fear than adult cats,” she said. “Kitten Kindergarten reviewed basic handling, manners and obedience.” “Cats tend to freak out when removed from their environment,” added Beaulieu. “They lose focus. They investigate the perimeter. They often won’t eat in a new space. They’re more comfortable in a colony, a group setting of cats. Clicker training works especially well with shy cats. Even the most suspicious cats watch the action and slowly come out of hiding. The idea that cars are aloof, non-social creatures isn’t true. Cats are social.” Kittens also learned that carriers aren’t scary. Carriers cause most cats to hide. The SDHS sent “students” a video prior to class that demonstrated how to invite cats to be comfortable in carriers. Often earmarked as a trip to the vet, carriers cause stress, “something we work to change” because of the importance of using them for natural disasters. Desensitized, crates become a wonderful place to go. Romero described the training room as a novel environment for even the shy or timid cat who’s never stepped out of the house. Kittens were set up in their own x-pen or pod. “Stepping away from its environment can be scary for a cat,” she said. “But all of our kittens – even those up for adoption – do really well. Kitten Kindergarten’s shy ones explored and played with new objects by the final session. We also taught owners how to exhaust energetic cats by refocusing their energy. Every owner appreciates a peaceful night’s sleep without a cat running around.” Romero and Beaulieu both agree that cats are stigmatized for their independent nature. Often left alone, owners assume their “personality is their personality” with no understanding of how to “handle and socialize kittens and cats to experience new sights and sounds to shape a well-balanced cat.” “Shaping behavior with tiny steps, we proactively work to prevent fear, anxiety or stress in kittens,” said Beaulieu. “Classes build from each other. Through the art of positive reinforcement and clicker training, owners realize that if willing, they can train their felines to do so much more. Kitten Kindergarten also introduced cat body language. Owners learned why cats behave and react to people and stimulus. We worked to increase the bond between cats and their humans.” Training included sitting, high fives, follow the target, lie down on your mat, come, off high counters, grooming – including the brushing of teeth and the use of kitty litters, carrier comfort and no stress DVM visits. “By pairing potentially scary things with treats, kittens associate scary isn’t so scary anymore,” continued Beaulieu. “A day at the veterinarian is a perfect example. Kittens learned to become comfortable being handled for weighing, restrained for vaccines, and checked – eyes ears, and nails.” Cats were also introduced to leash and harness training to underscore that felines can be safely walked outdoors. “Kittens are adorable, just adorable,” concluded Beaulieu. “Kitten Kindergarten was the highlight of my week. It was difficult not to get sucked into playing with kittens for the hour. Those who judge cats to be anything but great fun, haven’t met enough cats!” Additional classes will be scheduled as per “public interests.” Classes are not suggested for feral kittens or kittens who growl, snap, bite, exhibit fear or severe behavioral problems. Kittens too shy or too old for class can send their humans as auditors at a discounted rate. Auditors can watch, learn, ask questions and practice at home. Kitten Kindergarten is held at the SDHS San Diego Campus located on Gaines Street. Enrollment is limited to six kittens per class. Humans are required to prove at least one set of vaccines, a deworming, plus a negative result for an FELV prior to the first class. Those kittens showing signs of diarrhea, sneezing, congestion, and missing hair will not be allowed to participate. SDHS reserves the right to turn any kittens they deem unhealthy. Class participation is based on their own risk. Animals adopted from SDH will receive a 20 percent discount. Classes will be held indoors at the Gaines Street campus.
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    Artist draws out stories and smiles of senior citizens
    by Mathilde Rousseau Bjerregaard
    Dec 24, 2017 | 14280 views | 0 0 comments | 18 18 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    George, with artist Spence Willis, at the Golden Living Point Loma assisted living facility in the Midway District.
    George, with artist Spence Willis, at the Golden Living Point Loma assisted living facility in the Midway District.
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    Sandy at the Golden Living Point Loma assisted living facility in the Midway District.
    Sandy at the Golden Living Point Loma assisted living facility in the Midway District.
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    Don at White Sands in La Jolla.
    Don at White Sands in La Jolla.
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    Fourth generation San Diegan and artist, Spencer Willis, runs the nonprofit Draw for Smiles, which gives him the opportunity to visit community centers, senior centers, and hospitals throughout San Diego County and create caricature drawings of the residents and spread joy and happiness. “Draw for Smiles is a charity that reaches out to extend appreciation to others through fun, fast, caricatures, and improving lives through art,” said Willis. Willis went to art school when he was younger and he has been an artist for almost his whole life. Along with Draw for Smiles, he runs his own art company named “Spencer Art,” where he draws caricature drawings for birthday parties, graduations, weddings and other special event celebrations. He also works on outside art projects. “I want to make people smile through caricature art and life appreciation. It is an amazing affect it has on people to be drawn and to talk about their lives. It really brightens their day,” said Willis. Many years ago, Willis was in a bad motorcycle accident that sent him into a coma and left his dominant side paralyzed, so he became left handed. After going though a lot of therapy, he can now draw with his right hand again. But the accident inspired him to make a difference in the community, and to do something positive for the world. Willis started out doing charity work by drawing children’s cartoon books titled “Scully’s Books.” While doing that, he found out that he was better at drawing characters, and that artwork eventually turned into Draw for Smiles, which he has been running for about five years now. “I have devoted my life to Draw for Smiles and drawing caricature drawings, and the affect it has on peoples life’s is sensational,” said Willis. While Willis is drawing the caricature drawings of the residents at the senior centers, he is listening to them tell their life stories. He thinks that the fact he is taking his time to listen to their stories makes a big difference for the seniors. “The stories people share about their lives while being drawn at senior centers are simply amazing, sometimes funny, sometimes sad, but always heartwarming,” said Willis. For more information , visit spencer-willis.squarespace.com.
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    La Jolla year in review: Missing money, mainstay issues and much more to come
    by BLAKE BUNCH
    Dec 16, 2017 | 28747 views | 0 0 comments | 28 28 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    An aerial view of the Children’s Pool shot via drone. Note the amount of lounging pinnipeds. / PHOTO BY RYAN SHORT
    An aerial view of the Children’s Pool shot via drone. Note the amount of lounging pinnipeds. / PHOTO BY RYAN SHORT
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    Over the past year, the La Jolla area has seen its fair share of trying instances. Despite what has happened, however, there always remains an air of positivity in the community. Although things locally, nationally, and internationally may have appeared to have been tough, there were, as always, inevitably some wholly positive and endearing occurrences spotted throughout. We’ve compiled some of the more pressing issues all over La Jolla—from Bird Rock to the Golden Triangle—here’s what went down this past year. JAN. 13 On Dec. 15, La Jolla's Children's Pool, usually closed for the start of the five-month harbor seal pupping season, remained open. That opening remained in effect until the following day, Friday, Dec. 16, when the beach was closed, yet again, after the City of San Diego appealed — and was granted — a temporary stay to protect the marine mammals. In 2014, City Council banned public access at Children's Pool annually from Dec. 15 to May 15 to protect the seals during their pupping season. That action was subsequently challenged in a lawsuit against the city and the California Coastal Commission by Friends of the Children's Pool. A maintenance assessment district (MAD) passed by La Jolla businesses and residents in 2016, that won't go into effect until 2018, challenged by a lawsuit. A group known as La Jolla Benefits Association, LLC, filed a lawsuit on Dec. 28 in San Diego Superior Court. Former San Diego city attorney Michael J. Aguirre is representing the association. The association's suit challenged the MAD, which passed by a 56 percent to 44 percent margin by mail ballot to residents and businesses within La Jolla's downtown Village in November 2016. JAN. 27 The final "One Ocean Shamu" show was conducted at SeaWorld San Diego on Sunday, Jan. 8. Their interim educational orca presentation called a “Killer Whale Presentation” started on Monday, Jan. 9. SeaWorld set up temporary seating (bleachers) around the orca underwater viewing area pool, and provided guests with an educational presentation while the new Orca Encounter backdrop is constructed at the main pool. FEB. 10 A growing perception by some coastal residents, including La Jollans, that they're hearing more noise from commercial airplanes was disputed by a Federal Aviation Administration official at a Jan. 18 Airport Noise Advisory Committee subcommittee meeting. Some residents are insisting they're hearing loud airplane noises in areas previously unexposed. There was quite an impressive turnout for the groundbreaking ceremony at the new Conrad Prebys Performing Arts Center, which will be located at 7600 Fay Ave. for years to come. The $76 million project, of which about $62 million has already been raised, is slated for a grand opening around January of 2019. The 49,000-square-foot facility was designed by Boston-based Epstein Joslin Architects, and will boast a 500-seat concert hall, 140-seat flexible use space, rehearsal rooms, a large open courtyard and offices for the La Jolla Music Society. FEB. 24 A La Jolla man who was the accounts payable supervisor for a Sorrento Valley company plead guilty to embezzling $1.9 million from the firm for vacations, sporting event trips, and renting private jets. Edward K. Abellana, 40, faces up to 23 years in federal prison when he is sentenced on April 7 before U.S. District Court Judge Janis Sammartino. Abellana pleaded guilty to wire fraud and making a false tax return by not disclosing the embezzled funds as income. The tax returns in the charges are from 2012 to 2015. MARCH 10 Following a Feb. 20 bomb threat, which caused La Jolla's Jewish Community Center to be closed and evacuated, officials have struggled to explain why — and what could be done about it. It was the third similar threat this year at the Lawrence Family Jewish Community Center at 4126 Executive Drive. A 31-year-old man, Juan Thompson, was subsequently arrested March 3 in St. Louis. Thompson was allegedly linked to at least eight bogus bomb threats made against Jewish Community Centers across the nation, including La Jolla's, as part of a campaign to harass a former girlfriend. MARCH 24 The tide in the battle by beach residents seeking to restrict – or exclude – short-term vacation rentals in single-family neighborhoods may have turned with an about-face at the city attorney's office. Immediate past City Attorney Jan Goldsmith had maintained rules and regulations governing short-term vacation rentals were vague and needed clarification. New City Attorney Mara Elliott took a completely different tack with her March 15 memorandum of law advising the City Council that they were illegal. Two Mission Beach businessmen were placed on 18 months federal probation. and they paid the U.S. Coast Guard $18,000 for rescuing them after they intentionally sank their boat to try and collect insurance proceeds. Christopher Alan Switzer, 39, of La Jolla, and Mark D. Gillette, 37, of San Diego, were spared any jail time by U.S. District Court Judge Michael Anello. APRIL 21 An allegation surfaced of mismanagement of a playground fund with nonprofit La Jolla Recreation Council, which recently asked its president Cindy Greatrex to step down. An inside source requesting anonymity told La Jolla Village News that an amount of money originally estimated at $40,000 – which has since grown – was reported missing by a recreation council board member. Contacted by La Jolla Village News the morning of April 20, Greatrex, when informed that some playground funds had been reported missing, commented, “There are no missing funds.” MAY 5 Following the April 30 shooting at the La Jolla Crossroads apartment complex, which left Monique Clark, a 35-year-old mother of three, dead, several victims and witnesses were hesitant to dismiss the notion, provided by San Diego Police Chief Shelley Zimmerman, that race did not play a factor in the shooting. The shooter, 49-year-old Peter Raymond Selis, was white. Seven others were injured in the shooting. According to reports, four women and three men were shot. On Thursday, April 29, the City of San Diego Planning Commission voted unanimously to recommend approval of the Beverly and Joseph Glickman Hillel Center, to be located at the intersection of La Jolla Village Drive and Torrey Pines Road. “This is a very important day for us,” said Robert Lapidus, longtime chair of the Hillel Facilities Committee. “We have been working for nearly two decades on this project, and the Planning Commission’s vote brings us one step closer to making the Glickman Hillel Center a reality.” MAY 19 A senior couple was found dead with gunshot wounds in a suspected murder-suicide in a posh home in La Jolla's Mount Soledad about 7:30 p.m. on May 16. The deceased were identified by police early the following day as John Mattiace, 80, and Jilavi Parvaneh, 60, a married woman. Their bodies were discovered by police responding to the couple's son's request for a welfare check on his parents at their $3 million home at 5579 Avenida Fiesta in a cul-de-sac near Pacifica Drive. JUNE 2 A University City man accused of illegally selling firearms and heroin will next appear in federal court on June 8. Paul Joseph Holdy, 39, pleaded not guilty to three charges, but could face more counts after acting U.S. Attorney Alana Robinson said 19 firearms, including short barrel machine guns, were sold to undercover agents. With this past winter’s torrential rains, however, one of the most popular trails, the Broken Hill Trail, faced some safety issues resulting from erosion. This deterioration is why the California Conservation Corps have been hard at work since January working eight days on and six days off. JUNE 30 “Embracing the Beauty of Diversity in Our World” was the title of the public address given by Tenzin Gyatso, His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama on Friday, June 16 at UC San Diego’s RIMAC Field. His Holiness, now 81 years old, had flown in from Rochester, N.Y. the day before, but was cheerful and energetic as he delivered his 35-minute message about the importance of compassion. JULY 14 A woman who was charged with setting four coffee carts on fire at the University of California San Diego was committed on Friday, July 7 to a state psychiatric hospital because a judge found her mentally incompetent. Criminal proceedings remain suspended against Kay Lyn Williamson, 30, who was arrested after the bizarre April 17 incident in which four separate coffee kiosks were set on fire at different parts of the campus around midnight. San Diego Superior Court Judge Margo Woods read the psychiatric evaluation of Williamson before ordering her to go to Patton State Hospital for up to three years. JULY 28 La Jolla's Salk Institute for Biological Studies is one of the world's most renowned independent, non-profit, scientific research institutes. But does it discriminate against its tenured female scientists? That's the subject of a lawsuit filed by Victoria J. Lundblad, PhD, and Kathy Jones, PhD, which claims Salk has “allowed an old boys club to dominate creating a hostile work environment for Salk tenured women professors.” An angry La Jolla driver who rammed a parking enforcement vehicle after he got a parking ticket was sentenced July 28 after he pleaded guilty to assault with a vehicle. Court records say Peter Alex Dreier, 42, of Hillcrest, would likely be placed on three years probation, but could be sentenced up to a year in county jail in San Diego Superior Court. AUG. 11 On Friday, July 28, a group effort by a team of concerned beachgoers (both young and old), lifeguards, and SeaWorld Animal Health and Rescue personnel rescued a beached pygmy sperm whale that was stranded near Scripps tower. It is uncertain whether lifeguards or beachgoers first noticed the struggling sea mammal, but after sending off pictures and video of the animal to the necessary experts, everyone sprung into action. Unfortunately, it later died from its injuries. AUG. 25 Two men were ordered to stand trial for robbing a La Jolla man during a home invasion burglary. One man was additionally ordered to stand trial for a murder in Santee. Witnesses testified for three days in the preliminary hearing in El Cajon Superior Court in the case against Jose Nunez Torres, 22, and Gustavo Ceron, 25. Both men are charged with robbing Robert Hill, who testified they climbed through his kitchen window on Oct. 12, 2016. SEP. 8 An arrest warrant and Superior Court case alleges Cindy Greatrex stole $67,935.86 from the La Jolla Park and Recreation Committee while president of that group between May 2016 and February 2017. She and her attorney answered that claim is false — and they have the documentation to prove it. SEP. 22 n The San Diego City Council voted 5-3 Tuesday along party lines to oppose President Donald Trump's proposal to construct a billon-dollar wall at the U.S.-Mexico border. The City Council's five Democrats voted in favor of Councilmember Georgette Gomez's resolution to oppose Trump's executive order to build a wall and to oppose a House bill seeking to fund it from a fee on remittance transactions sent from the U.S. to several other countries. OCT. 6 n The San Diego City Council unanimously declared a shelter crisis Oct.2 as it related to the hepatitis A outbreak that has killed 17 people who were mostly homeless. Mayor Kevin Faulconer endorsed the action, saying it would help in setting up three temporary shelters for the homeless soon including one in the Midway District, which will be located at a Navy-owned lot in the 2700 block of Sports Arena Drive. n One of three lifeguard towers built in La Jolla during the past decade, construction on the Children's Pool Tower began in early 2013. It was opened June 27. Almost immediately, the tower's public restrooms began backing up and leaking into lifeguard showers and locker rooms, temporarily closing public toilets and forcing lifeguards to retreat into a temporary trailer. OCT. 20 On Oct. 18, a day before his centennial birthday, La Jolla Shores boardwalk was renamed Walter Munk Way honoring the esteemed scientist. Walter Heinrich Munk was born on Oct. 19, 1917. He is a physical oceanographer and professor of geophysics emeritus at Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla. He is one of the world's foremost authorities on winds, waves, and other projects. NOV. 3 The YMCA of San Diego County was fined $17,000 on Oct. 20 and ordered to abide by numerous probation conditions for a chlorine spill that sickened 79 elementary students and eight adults in 2015. The YMCA, as a nonprofit corporation, pleaded guilty to four felony counts and one misdemeanor that involved a hazardous waste spill. NOV. 17 Citing the hepatitis A outbreak and ongoing renovations, Mary, Star of the Sea, a Catholic church in La Jolla, decided to abruptly halt a charitable program that has consistently fed the needy for more than nine years. Through the program, So Others May Eat, meals that were provided every second Tuesday of each month will no longer be served at the church. So Others May Eat alternates weekly, providing meals to the less fortunate at Sacred Heart Church in Ocean Beach and Mary, Star of the Sea. In 2015, Sharon Wampler and about 80 of her Bird Rock neighbors started out on a quest to clarify — and tighten — some of the city's rules governing so-called “McMansions,” oversized homes on undersized lots.
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    Sharing the love of reading with Lee’s Little Lending Library in Pacific Beach
    Lee Fowler Schwimmer of Pacific Beach used to be a yoga instructor. Now she’s a librarian, of sorts. Having set up Lee’s Little Lending Library in front of her home on Diamond and Dawes streets, Fo...
    Published - Sunday, September 13
    full story
    Citizens group fights city’s new short-term vacation rentals proposal
    The City of San Diego has been put on notice by citizens group Save San Diego Neighborhoods that if the mayor and City Council intend to change the city’s municipal code to allow short-term vacatio...
    Published - Saturday, September 12
    full story
    Education Notebook: Coffee with the Principal at CPJMA
    Mission Bay High - The MBHS varsity football team won their home opener 36-13 against West Hills High School in front of a full house under the new lights on the new field. Students, parents, and f...
    Published - Friday, September 11
    full story
    Google Fiber to explore bringing high speed Internet to San Diego
    Mayor Kevin L. Faulconer announced on Sept. 10 that Google Fiber will begin working with the City of San Diego to explore the possibility of building a brand new high-speed broadband network in the...
    Published - Thursday, September 10
    full story
    Midway bluff plan delayed, Bird Rock council hears
    Bird Rock Community Council learned in September that construction on the Midway bluff stabilization project is going to be delayed. “We had estimated to go to construction in October, but since th...
    Published - Thursday, September 10
    full story
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