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    La Jolla news and community briefs
    Feb 23, 2018 | 3727 views | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    La Jolla Shores recently came in at No. 22 on TripAdvisor’s ‘Top 25 Beaches’ in the U.S. Pacific Beach received some notice as well, ranking No. 20. A vast majority of beaches on the annual list were located in the Southeast, with Clearwater Beach, Fla., taking the No. 1 position. Several other Florida beaches were on this list as well... and, to be expected, three Hawaiian beaches. THOMAS MELVILLE / VILLAGE NEWS
    La Jolla Shores recently came in at No. 22 on TripAdvisor’s ‘Top 25 Beaches’ in the U.S. Pacific Beach received some notice as well, ranking No. 20. A vast majority of beaches on the annual list were located in the Southeast, with Clearwater Beach, Fla., taking the No. 1 position. Several other Florida beaches were on this list as well... and, to be expected, three Hawaiian beaches. THOMAS MELVILLE / VILLAGE NEWS
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    Salk and UC San Diego scientists receive $1.5 million to study firefighter health We count on firefighters to protect us in life-threatening situations. So it's in everyone's best interest for them to be healthy and fit. Salk Institute and University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers have been awarded a $1.5 million grant by the Department of Homeland Security for a three-year study to see whether restricting food intake to a 10-hour window can improve firefighters' well-being. "Firefighters seem invincible to us, but they are actually at high risk for many chronic diseases because of how shift work disrupts the body's natural rhythms," says Satchidananda Panda, a professor in Salk's Regulatory Biology Laboratory and co-principal investigator of the new study. "We want to understand if we can counter some of the disruptions with simple changes not only to what firefighters eat but also when they eat." For most of human evolutionary history, daylight and access to food were limited. So almost every cell in our body has a biological clock that tells it when to be active—using the nutrients from food to grow and conduct normal business—and when to rest. These 24-hour clocks produce circadian (daily) rhythms in almost every aspect of physiology and behavior. Increasing evidence is showing that disruptions to this natural cycle caused by the modern lifestyle, with its artificial light and round-the-clock access to food, can impact our health, resulting in everything from poor-quality sleep to obesity, heart disease, diabetes, and cancer.  Panda, whose laboratory studies the molecular bases of circadian timekeeping in mammals, previously found that restricting the access of lab mice to food for 8–10 hours a day resulted in slimmer, healthier animals compared to mice that ate the same number of calories around the clock. Preliminary studies in humans suggest similar health benefits of such "time-restricted eating," which does not change the quality or quantity of food, just the time period in which it is consumed. Because firefighters are at higher risk of developing cardiovascular diseases than the general public, Panda and collaborating co-principal investigator Pam Taub, MD, associate professor of medicine at UC San Diego School of Medicine, plan to use the grant to test the effectiveness of a circadian-rhythm-based diet intervention compared to standard nutritional behavioral counseling on firefighters' cardiovascular health. "Shift workers, like firefighters, are a critical part of our community’s well-being and we need to identify strategies to improve their overall cardiovascular health. We believe that a simple lifestyle intervention, such as time-restricted eating, can prevent or help reverse cardiovascular diseases, such as high blood pressure, diabetes and coronary artery disease,” says Taub, cardiologist, and director of the Step Family Cardiovascular and Rehabilitation Center at UC San Diego Health. “The goal of our study is to better understand how giving the body a 'metabolic rest' by limiting the amount of time food is consumed can improve important parameters for health such as weight, blood glucose levels, and cholesterol.” The circadian intervention will incorporate an app developed by the Panda lab and already tested by thousands of people to conveniently track food intake, sleep and exercise habits. The study will enroll 150 firefighters who will be randomly assigned to either the circadian group, whose food intake will be limited to a 10-hour period or the behavioral counseling group, which will serve as the control. In addition to regular clinic visits to measure blood glucose and lipid levels, all subjects will undergo continuous health monitoring via wearable sensors.    The study will be a close collaboration between Salk, UC San Diego and the San Diego Fire-Rescue Department, which has a robust wellness program. “The wellness of our employees is our top priority,” says San Diego Fire-Rescue Chief Brian Fennessy. “We are hopeful this study will give our members information they can apply to their lives, which will reduce the incidence of chronic disease that firefighters are prone to.” The study will be closely watched by the National Fire Protection Association, which is interested in extending any beneficial results to other fire departments. And because nearly 20 percent of Americans are shift workers with nonstandard hours of activity and rest, the study results may also prove applicable to these individuals and their family members, who can likewise be substantially impacted by a shift worker's schedule.  "We are very excited about this study, which embodies a collaborative model for biomedical research in which landmark discoveries from a premier basic science institute are tested in a real-world situation through a world-class medical research entity,” says Panda. “It's a win-win-win." ‘Kosher gospel’ act The Klezmatics in La Jolla Klezmer and gospel collide with brilliant and euphoric results as the San Diego Center for Jewish Culture, housed at the Lawrence Family Jewish Community Center, hosts The Klezmatics with Special Guest Joshua Nelson: Brother Moses Smote the Water. The event, perfectly timed for both Passover and Easter, will be held on Wednesday, March 28 at 7:30 p.m. at the David & Dorothea Garfield Theatre, 4126 Executive Drive, La Jolla.  At this exclusive concert, the gutsy, award-winning band that defines klezmer’s edge, teams up with special guest artist Joshua Nelson, who sings Black-Jewish soul that recalls Mahalia Jackson. Experience a cross-cultural celebration of freedom songs from the Jewish and African-American traditions, illustrating their spiritual common ground while weaving a musical story of inspiration and social action. Oprah Winfrey describes Joshua Nelson as “the next big thing in music.”  The Klezmatics are the only klezmer band to win a Grammy award. They emerged out of the vibrant cultural scene of New York City’s East Village in 1986 with klezmer steeped in Eastern European Jewish tradition and spirituality and incorporated contemporary themes such as human rights and anti-fundamentalism and eclectic musical influences including Arab, African, Latin and Balkan rhythms, jazz and punk. In the course of over 20 years and nine albums, they have stubbornly continued making music that is wild, mystical, provocative, reflective and ecstatically danceable. Advance tickets for The Klezmatics with Special Guest Joshua Nelson: Brother Moses Smote the Water are $35-$75. Tickets will be available for purchase at the door for $40-$80.  The event will be assigned seating. For more information contact the JCC Box Office at 858-362-1348 or sdcjc.org/boxoffice. Fortune Magazine names Scripps to ‘National Best Companies’ list for 11th year For the 11th consecutive year, Scripps Health has been named among the top employers in the nation by Fortune magazine. Fortune’s 21st annual list of the 100 Best Companies to Work For ranked Scripps at No. 41. For the third consecutive year, Scripps is the only San Diego-based company to make the list. Scripps is recognized for creating a high-performing, diverse workforce by accommodating the needs of its employees at the beginning, middle and later stages of their careers. “Once again, we are honored to be on Fortune’s 100 Best Companies to Work For list, and to be recognized as an inclusive, career-destination organization that works to create an environment where employees feel appreciated and empowered to deliver the best patient care in San Diego,” said Scripps President and CEO Chris Van Gorder. Fortune recognized Scripps for developing its workforce through programs that engage and encourage contributions from all employees. Scripps employees in response say they are grateful for the many opportunities available to them to grow in their jobs and advance their careers. More than 93 percent of Scripps employees feel the organization offers great workplace rewards and challenges, according to a survey by Great Place to Work, Fortune’s partner. As part of its career-destination philosophy, Scripps has developed several innovative practices for employees at different stages of their careers. Scripps offers career coaching; employee care clinics; as well as family-friendly programs, including child care, flexible work arrangements and paid parental leave. “Despite the many changes in healthcare, our primary goal remains to provide the best patient care, and we believe that is best delivered by a motivated, educated and supported workforce,” said Richard Sheridan, corporate senior vice president for human resources at Scripps Health. Scripps supports the academic development of its employees by administering scholarships, tuition reimbursement and discounts for courses offered by universities that have partnerships with Scripps. In the most recent year, Scripps invested more than $35 million in training for employees. Additionally, Scripps provided $1.33 million in tuition reimbursement and scholarships. Scripps also encourages movement across the organization through various programs, which is something that mid-career employees appreciate since it allows them to chart their career paths with organizational support. Scripps offers staged retirement to eligible, experienced employees who want to retire gradually, allowing them to reduce their current work schedule while maintaining their health benefits.   Scripps encourages experienced employees to continue working in other ways. While traditional retirement packages at many other organizations max out at age 60, encouraging employees to leave at that point, Scripps lets retirement plans continue to grow past age 65. Older employees enjoy this benefit because it allows them to continue working without feeling financial pressure to retire. In addition to making Fortune’s 100 Best Companies to Work For list, Scripps was recognized with other national workforce awards during the past year. For the fifth consecutive year, Scripps was named one of the Top 10 Nonprofit Companies for Executive Women for 2017 by the National Association for Female Executives (NAFE); for the 13th consecutive year Working Mother Magazine named Scripps one of the 100 Best Companies in 2017; and Becker’s Healthcare named Scripps to its list of 150 Great Places to Work in Healthcare. Annual used book sale takes over Lawrence Family JCC Put down your Nook and pick up a real book. From March 14 to 18, one of the largest used book sales in the county, this is a not-to-be-missed event for book lovers of all ages. Give yourself plenty of time to browse our huge selection featuring Everyone is bound to find something in our sale including books for children and young adults, cookbooks, fiction and non-fiction, Judaic topics, gifts, art and more with prices starting at just 50 cents. History buffs and antiquarian book collectors are sure to find some treasures among the collection of books on the Civil War, British history magazines on WWII, antiquarian books from 1820 to 1910, classic writings from Bret Harte, Abraham Lincoln, an Honore de Balzac set in the 1890s, poems of Joaquin Miller from 1909 and more. Travelers will want to peruse their selections on Hawaii, New York City, Israel and exotic destinations. Culture lovers will delight in the variety of art books, artwork, and an original of Theadius McCall’s Jewish People series, Jewish music CDs, and movies. Gift givers can pick up something special for a loved one or add something to a holiday table with decorative Judaica items such as seder plates, menorahs (hanukiot), and items made of pewter, glass, and silver. Pre-sale shopping will be held on Wednesday, March 14, from 7:30 to 9:30 a.m. Cost is $20. The clearance sale will be held on Sunday, March 18, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Cost is $10 for “all the books you can fit into one grocery bag (some exceptions apply).  For more information, visit sdcjc.org/ajl/used_books.aspx. To volunteer or make donations, email: melanier@lfjcc.org, or call 858-362-1141. Book donations accepted through Feb. 28.
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    Three new bike share businesses roll into San Diego
    Feb 23, 2018 | 7439 views | 1 1 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    LimeBike's bright green bicycles.
    LimeBike's bright green bicycles.
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    ofo's yellow bikes.
    ofo's yellow bikes.
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    Mobike's silver and orange bikes.
    Mobike's silver and orange bikes.
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    Walking to a destination has become passé. San Diegans are now rolling, as three new bike share businesses started peddling their dock-less cycles throughout the City in the past two weeks. LimeBike brought out its bright green bicycles on Feb. 16, making it the first dock-free bike share business to launch in the City. Soon after, Ofo planned to began deploying its yellow bikes to share. And on Feb. 23, Mobike rolls out its signature silver and orange dock-less bikes to locations in San Diego. After launching in Imperial Beach and National City last year, LimeBike expanded its service area to all of San Diego. They also plan to roll out their Electric Assist Bike model, dubbed Lime-E, and soon a scooter, called Lime-S, making San Diego the first market to have all three LimeBike options. LimeBikes are available in more than 45 markets. All their bikes are GPS and 3G-enabled, making it simple for riders to find, unlock and pick up a nearby bike using their smartphone. When the ride is finished, riders simply lock the bike's back wheel and responsibly park between the pedestrian-designated sidewalk and the street curb, or at a bike rack. To celebrate the launch, riders can use code “SDLIMEBIKE5” for $5 in credits towards rides until end of February. Since first launching in LA last November, Ofo has seen a positive response from folks who have welcomed a greener and more affordable way to travel. Whether it’s filling a transportation gap during a morning commute, running errands during lunch, or enjoying the outdoors on the weekends, Ofo riders appreciate the convenience and availability of bike sharing when and where they want it. How it works: Open the app and find all the bright yellow bikes around you. When you're at the bike, tap "unlock" and scan the barcode to automatically unlock and enjoy the ride. Simply park your bike and manually lock it to end the trip. To celebrate their entrance into San Diego, ofo is offering free rides through the end of February.   San Diego becomes Mobike’s fifth U.S. market, and adds to the company’s global expansion into more than 200 cities and 12 countries in less than two years.   Using specially-designed bikes equipped with GPS and proprietary smart-lock technology, Mobike enables users of its smartphone app to find a bike near them, to reserve and unlock it. After reaching their destination, users manually lock the bike, which automatically makes the bike available to the next rider. One of Mobike’s core principles is responsible operating, meaning the quantity and location of bikes are exclusively based on supply and demand. This tactic maximizes impact while reducing congestion, ensuring bikes are where the community needs them, when they need them. To find out more about the new bike sharing businesses, visit mobike.com, ofo.com, and limebike.com.
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    Jbettles
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    9 Hours Ago
    Excited to see some alternate modes of transportation in PB! However, it seems the cart came before the horse with inadequate bike lanes for the big increase in bicycle/scooter usage. Perhaps these companies should be taxed to pay for new bike lanes? Would love to see some safe protected bike lanes around PB. Maybe this is a first start in making that happen.
    La Jolla fireworks display halted due to fundraising issues
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Feb 20, 2018 | 8166 views | 0 0 comments | 7 7 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    The 2017 Fourth of July fireworks display went off without a hitch. This year, however, they will come to an abrupt halt. DON BALCH/VILLAGE NEWS
    The 2017 Fourth of July fireworks display went off without a hitch. This year, however, they will come to an abrupt halt. DON BALCH/VILLAGE NEWS
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    After a 32-year run, the Fourth of July fireworks display at La Jolla Cove is done. Due to ongoing fundraising problems, La Jolla’s annual pyrotechnic display has been forced to cancel this year. And the possibility of ever reviving it appears bleak. “Unfortunately, in early January 2018, it was brought to our attention that many of the donors have moved on to other concerns, and will not be making contributions to the fireworks this year,” said Fourth of July organizers, including the La Jolla Village Merchants Association, in a Feb. 20 press release. “We have contacted all the donors to determine the viability of the event this year.  Of the many donors, only one responded that they pledged to donate this year.” The letter went on to state the event "depends upon pledged donations that are received early since the event requires large, non-refundable deposits to reserve the date. Without these donations, the La Jolla fireworks are not funded. So, it is with sadness, we must make the announcement that we will not be moving forward this year to reserve a fireworks vendor.” For its first quarter-century, the annual La Jolla Cove fireworks display, begun by La Jolla restaurateur George Hauer in 1985, went almost without a hitch. Then came legal challenges alleging environmental damage to the ocean from the annual coastal, one-day pyrotechnic display.  After Hauer stepped back relinquishing control of the event, it was saved by the formation of a grassroots group known as La Jolla Community Fireworks Foundation. Spearheaded by Deborah Marengo, LJCFF has struggled ever since to raise the approximately $60,000 — and rising — the cost of staging fireworks annually. LJVMA, the community’s business improvement district, took over the fireworks extravaganza in 2015 and had been working with Marengo to keep the event afloat. But Marengo told La Jolla Village News the formidable task of fundraising for fireworks each year has just become overwhelming. “This year we had four sponsors fall out, and I was looking at raising another $30,000 to put this (display) on,” Marengo said adding she had contract commitments that needed to be honored soon. “It’s just hard to keep going, year in and year out when you have to start fundraising all over again late in the game.” Marengo said she and others pulled out all the stops in one last-ditch attempt to secure fireworks sponsorship this year, noting, “We had a few sponsors, but not enough to make a dent.” Reacting personally to the loss of the event, Marengo said, “It’s very sad. It’s really heartbreaking. I wish there was something else that I could do, but the task just keeps getting larger and larger.” Pointing out Fourth of July is one San Diego’s biggest annual events and the largest crowd draws, Marengo added it was a “daunting task” to handle, and pay for, everything from retaining a private company to do the display, to hiring police and handling all the security necessary to make a fireworks display safe for the public. Marengo said she shouldered the burden of organizing the Cove display for several years because “it was important for me and the community. It’s really been part of our tradition. So, it’s just really sad to see that go.” Marengo summed her feelings about fireworks' fizzling in saying, “We were able to keep it going every year through lawsuits and everything. But the event … I think it’s time (end) has come.” “The annual 4th of July Fireworks event could not have made it since 2008, without the many people behind the scenes who volunteer their time,” concluded the joint letter on the event’s cancellation sent out to La Jollans. “We want to use this opportunity to thank everyone who stepped in to make the past Fourth of July events happen.” 
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    La Jolla news and community briefs
    Feb 11, 2018 | 25345 views | 0 0 comments | 14 14 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    While it may seem as though these recent lunar phenomena have become commonplace, the ‘Super Blue Blood Moon,’ as dubbed by NASA, on Jan. 31 provided contrasting hues to a crystal clear La Jolla evening. The occurrence was actually a combination of a Blue Moon, super moon and total lunar eclipse, and will not occur again until Jan. 31, 2037. / DON BALCH/VILLAGE NEWS
    While it may seem as though these recent lunar phenomena have become commonplace, the ‘Super Blue Blood Moon,’ as dubbed by NASA, on Jan. 31 provided contrasting hues to a crystal clear La Jolla evening. The occurrence was actually a combination of a Blue Moon, super moon and total lunar eclipse, and will not occur again until Jan. 31, 2037. / DON BALCH/VILLAGE NEWS
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    Ways & Means Oyster House to add La Jolla to its worldscape Ways & Means Oyster House, a Huntington Beach venue planning expansions into North Africa, Asia and the Middle East, will open on a spring date to be announced at 1251 Prospect, former home of Alfonso’s of La Jolla. Alfonso’s relocated to Solana Beach in 2017. The La Jolla location will have the same menu as its Huntington Beach and Tigard, Ore. properties, including freshly shucked oysters and grilled oysters with toppings. It will also include a selection of small plates featuring crab cake sliders, fish tacos, bacon-wrapped shrimp and lobster deviled eggs. Daily specials will also be for sale. Ways & Means has an extensive bar program, featuring private label wines and beer. Every month, two wines will be available for off-site sales through the company website (wmoysters.com) and pick-up. Ways & Means will serve lunch and dinner every day, along with a weekend brunch and a weekday afternoon happy hour. Padres Pedal the Cause provides $2.4M for cancer research Padres Pedal the Cause has donated more than $2.4 million to support cancer studies at the Salk Institute, Rady Children’s Hospital, Moores Cancer Center at UC San Diego Health and Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute. The check was presented to representatives from the four organizations on January 24 and was the largest donation ever made by the grassroots organization. Hundreds of cyclists participated in the fifth annual Pedal the Cause on Nov. 11 and 12 at Petco Park. The Salk Institute team featured 18 riders and raised nearly $25,000. Proceeds from the event support innovative cancer projects with a major emphasis on collaborative, translational research that offers a clear path to clinical trials.  “Funding from Padres Pedal the Cause is already having a big impact on our ability to understand cancer and exploit its vulnerabilities,” says Reuben Shaw, who directs the Salk Institute Cancer Center. “These resources mean cancer researchers at Salk collaborate with clinicians and researchers at UC San Diego Moores on new therapies and new insights to develop treatments of the future to root out this horrific disease.”  For the past five years, Salk has been a major partner with Pedal the Cause, on both the fundraising and research sides of the equation. “We’re fortunate to have such a strong relationship with the Salk Institute," says Pedal the Cause executive director Anne Marchand. “In addition to the work they do every day in the lab to advance cancer research in San Diego, they lead by example in supporting Padres Pedal with a dedicated team of riders and volunteers. We look forward to continuing to partner with Team Salk for years to come.” For researchers at Salk, and around San Diego's life sciences hub, the Torrey Pines mesa, this funding will support ongoing efforts to illuminate the basic biology that drives cancer and translate those findings into new therapies. To date, Padres Pedal the Cause has raised more than $7 million to fund 31 cancer research projects. One of these is Salk Assistant Professor Graham McVicker’s work on acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the most common childhood cancer. “The research grant has helped my lab and the Dixon lab at the Salk Institute catalyze a new collaborative project to study pediatric leukemia with Dennis Kuo at Rady Children’s Hospital,” says McVicker. “This is our first time working on a project together, and we are excited about the potential to make new discoveries.” Sweetfin Poké to open at Westfield UTC Founded in 2015 by fraternity brothers Seth Cohen and Brett Nestadt, Sweetfin Poké is one of LA’s most popular poke shops with seven locations now open throughout the city. This chef-driven, California inspired concept prides itself in its “Pole to Bowl” philosophy, sourcing only the highest-quality and most sustainable raw fish they can find while still maintaining a reasonable price point. Not to mention, former Top Chef contestant Dakota Weiss is its founding chef and partner. This is their first endeavor outside fo L.A. with plans to continue growing in San Diego. Their second location will be in Del Mar at the One Paseo development. The Sweetfin team is on a clear trajectory for growth with Chef Dakota on track to be one of the most commercially successful women-owned restauranteurs in Southern California with six Sweetfin locations open and operational within six months. In 2016, they received additional funding from longtime hospitality executive and "Fast Food Architect" David Swinghamer who is a founding partner at Danny Meyer's Union Square Hospitality. Grand opening on Friday, Feb. 23 at 11 a.m.: To celebrate the grand opening, they’ve partnered with local Hawaiian-style shave ice connoisseur Wailua Shave Ice to give away free shaved ice the first 200 guests who visit their UTC shop. Music, champagne and the magic of giving will come together in a classical piano recital and elegant reception benefiting San Diego Youth Services Hosted by the Daneshmand family, and featuring three-generations of their accomplished piano artistry, this memorable winter afternoon will showcase a musical program of beautiful classical pieces by world-renowned composers. The campus of Congregational Church of La Jolla will offer a beautiful and inviting backdrop for the occasion, which will take place Saturday, Feb. 3, from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. This year's musical celebration represents the fifth in a series of Daneshmand Family Performances, hosted for the benefit of nonprofit organizations dedicated to building stronger families and vibrant communities. Darya, Sahra, and Ava Daneshmand are sisters and San Diego residents. The sisters will take to the stage with their cousins, Saba and Tara, sisters who reside in Los Angeles. Performances by their father, Dr. Siamak Daneshmand, a prominent urologic oncological surgeon at the University of Southern California's Norris Cancer Center, and grandfather, Dr. Hamid Daneshmand, a periodontist, who also lives in Los Angeles, will round out the recital program. "My family is delighted to dedicate this year's recital to San Diego Youth Services, a nonprofit organization dedicated to fighting youth homelessness and youth in crisis," Ladan Daneshmand said. "Our performances offer us a wonderful opportunity to share our love of classical piano music, as well as the joy of playing together, with our audiences. Our family is also passionate about making a difference. Shining a spotlight on San Diego Youth Services, while raising awareness and funding for its important mission, brings our family performances full-circle." There is no cost to attend. Guests, however, are encouraged to make a financial contribution to San Diego Youth Services.To reserve seats, or make a contribution, visit punchbowl.com/part. UC San Diego conference to address U.S.-Mexico 'War on Drugs' The "War on Drugs" has been ongoing for several decades, yet its failure can be felt on both sides of the U.S.-Mexican border­­­­­­­­­­­­­­. In the last 16 years, the opioid epidemic has claimed close to 125,000 lives in the U.S., whereas in Mexico the war on drugs has produced an estimated 200,000 deaths and over 30,000 disappearances in the last decade. The Center for U.S.-Mexican Studies at the University of California San Diego's School of Global Policy and Strategy is hosting on Feb. 9  conference on “Rethinking the War on Drugs and U.S.-Mexico Security Cooperation” that will discuss transnational and local challenges and will seek to propose practical solutions for policymakers in the U.S. and Mexico. “The cooperation of the U.S. and Mexico is more critical now than ever,” said Rafael Fernández de Castro, director of the Center for U.S.-Mexican Studies. “In recent months, the U.S. has publicly embraced unilateral policies to cross-border challenges while Mexico has de-prioritized security issues. As the two countries have turned away from bilateral cooperation, the complex and region-wide factors driving and exacerbating the U.S and Mexico's most pressing security issues have continued unabated.” From a former White House advisor to former directors of Mexico’s intelligence agencies and members of the national media, the conference participants also include top policymakers and scholars from both sides of the border. The panelists’ topics will evaluate Mexico’s many forms of victimization, examine region-wide factors for the resurgence of violence and the status of current U.S.-Mexico security cooperation. “This conference is especially timely with the upcoming elections in Mexico and we hope the event can propose solutions for key stakeholders,” said Cecilia Farfán-Méndez, a visiting fellow at the Center for U.S.-Mexican Studies. “Our goal is to propose a new framework beyond the Mérida Initiative that truly privileges cooperation and shared responsibility rather than confrontation between the U.S. and Mexico." The daylong conference is free and open to the public and will take place from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., on Feb. 9 at the Village Building 2, located on the UC San Diego campus. San Diego Unified middle schools to participate in musical theater program sponsored by La Jolla Playhouse Middle school students in the San Diego Unified School District may be one step closer to their big break. The JumpStart Theatre Program is accepting applications from district middle schools to participate in a three-year, fully-funded musical theater program sponsored by La Jolla Playhouse and the Educational Theatre Association (EdTA). Three district middle schools will be selected to participate in the program during the 2018-19 school year, giving non-theater teachers the skills, support and resources necessary to produce their campus’s first musical through a proven combination of hands-on mentoring and boot-camp style training. This opportunity will expand access to the arts for many San Diego Unified students, underscoring the district’s ongoing commitment to arts education. La Jolla Playhouse was chosen as one of two theater companies in the country to spearhead the national expansion of the highly successful JumpStart Theatre Program, established in 2014 by the Educational Theatre Association in Cincinnati. La Jolla Playhouse has long established itself as an advocate of arts education, through such programs as the Performing Outreach Program Tour and the Young Performers series of summer theater training programs. "We are thrilled to have JumpStart Theatre come to San Diego Unified. What a terrific opportunity for our middle school students to not only have an arts experience but to develop their 21st-century skills,” said San Diego Unified Superintendent Cindy Marten. “We know JumpStart Theatre will continue our vision to transform lives through the arts. Thank you to our great local community partner, La Jolla Playhouse, and to the Educational Theatre Association." The application is open to all San Diego Unified middle schools. Applications are due Feb. 23. Selection criteria includes the commitment of a minimum of three educators from each school who will remain dedicated to the program for the duration. Previous theater experience is not required. Schools will be mentored by La Jolla Playhouse teaching artists throughout the entire program with the goal of building a sustainable, long-term musical theatre curriculum. "We are honored to be one of the inaugural regional partners for EdTA’s JumpStart Theatre program. La Jolla Playhouse is known for – and deeply committed to – the development of new plays and musicals, and the JumpStart Theatre Program provides a terrific proven method of empowering teachers to produce musicals in their middle schools,” said La Jolla Playhouse Managing Director Michael S. Rosenberg. “The opportunity to partner with EdTA and San Diego Unified in bringing the joy of musical theater to students and teachers in our community while building life skills through participation in the arts, could not be a better fit for La Jolla Playhouse.” ‘Your money’s no good’ at Tender Greens venues Your paper money is no longer acceptable at Tender Greens, a fast-casual fare venue that operates in the UTC area, Liberty Station, Mission Valley and downtown San Diego.  Company officials say the move is a response to technological advances and the need to save time. They add that the change is better for the environment amid the lack of need for paper deposit slips and for visits by armored trucks. The credit, debit and mobile payment set-up were tested successfully at the restaurant’s El Segundo outlet. This month, the restaurant is also touting a digital gift card feature on its mobile app. Starbucks in Seattle is considering a similar cashless program. - Martin J. Westlin
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    Local photographer and artisan open joint venture on Fay Ave.
    by BLAKE BUNCH
    Feb 09, 2018 | 12129 views | 0 0 comments | 22 22 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    ‘Salk Autumnal Equinox’ is a prime example of the photographer’s work. / EVGENY YOROBE
    ‘Salk Autumnal Equinox’ is a prime example of the photographer’s work. / EVGENY YOROBE
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    If you have a social media account in San Diego, odds are high that you have seen photographer Evgeny Yorobe’s work. His ethereal depictions of some of the most iconic locations throughout the city are frequently shared at a higher-than-average frequency. Yorobe, a San Diego native, has now partnered with craftsman Will Waters to open a new studio at 7660 Fay Ave. Their grand opening will be held on Saturday, Feb. 10 from 5 to 10 p.m. in conjunction with the La Jolla Art Walk. This is not Yorobe and Water’s first cooperative business effort, however, as the two have worked together over the past three years at the Little Italy and La Jolla farmers markets. Waters’ specialty is high-quality woodwork (Creations By Will). At the studio, one front corner is dedicated to his custom-designed shaving kits. From razors, bowls and brushes, to all-natural shave soaps and after-shaves, his aim is to bring back what he refers to as “the art of shaving” without breaking the bank. His early work was a direct result of serving in the Navy. “When I was in the service, we had to shave every day,” said Waters. “And honestly, I was highly disappointed with what was offered. That’s when I began to do some research, producing my own safety razors. Now, we sell similar razors starting at $40.” Yorobe has close ties to the area. Not only is Scripps Pier, ever popular among photographers (and one of his favorites), within close proximity, but he learned his craft while studying at the University of California San Diego. The light entering their bright studio highlights familiar golden-hour captures of Broken Hill, the Windsansea shack, the Cove, Salk Institute and much more. The photographer’s work is available in a variety of mediums: matte-board paper prints start at $40, then move up in size to around $100. It is perhaps his de-sublimated prints, available on either acrylic or metal, that set the artist’s individual or tryptic pieces apart from all other local photographers. “I have a lab in Scripps Ranch where the larger prints are produced,” said Yorobe. “But with the paper/matte board prints, I can print them right out of the back office in our studio.” Discussing his shot of Scripps Pier, where two times a year the sun lines up perfectly between pilings at sunset, Water and Yorobe wax philosophical. “It’s really great because it can be a little moody and at times dark, but is always beautiful,” Yorobe says. “Every pier is different here, and it’s interesting to see,” said Waters. “Whereas Crystal Pier could see a lot more activity, at Scripps it’s always serene and peaceful – they’re all different.” One question could remain, however. How did the two assimilate to businesses that, on the surface, may not make sense to some. Yorobe and Waters would view the contrary. Both of them are fine artists, and while Yorobe’s visuals may supplement Waters’ craftsmanship and vice versa, their new venture sees them working together in what was seemingly a “Eureka!” moment. “I’m currently working on some entry tables that take into account Evgeny’s compositions,” said Waters. “This has been the most forefront of our collaboration.” The two artists say that they will be incrementally placing new pieces throughout the space as time unfolds. For more information, visit sandiego-landscapes.com, or call 858-467-0952. Also, visit CreationsByWill.com or call 760-835-1853.
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