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    La Jolla fireworks display halted due to fundraising issues
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Feb 20, 2018 | 397 views | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    The 2017 Fourth of July fireworks display went off without a hitch. This year, however, they will come to an abrupt halt. DON BALCH/VILLAGE NEWS
    The 2017 Fourth of July fireworks display went off without a hitch. This year, however, they will come to an abrupt halt. DON BALCH/VILLAGE NEWS
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    After a 32-year run, the Fourth of July fireworks display at La Jolla Cove is done. Due to ongoing fundraising problems, La Jolla’s annual pyrotechnic display has been forced to cancel this year. And the possibility of ever reviving it appears bleak. “Unfortunately, in early January 2018, it was brought to our attention that many of the donors have moved on to other concerns, and will not be making contributions to the fireworks this year,” said Fourth of July organizers, including the La Jolla Village Merchants Association, in a Feb. 20 press release. “We have contacted all the donors to determine the viability of the event this year.  Of the many donors, only one responded that they pledged to donate this year.” The letter went on to state the event "depends upon pledged donations that are received early since the event requires large, non-refundable deposits to reserve the date. Without these donations, the La Jolla fireworks are not funded. So, it is with sadness, we must make the announcement that we will not be moving forward this year to reserve a fireworks vendor.” For its first quarter-century, the annual La Jolla Cove fireworks display, begun by La Jolla restaurateur George Hauer in 1985, went almost without a hitch. Then came legal challenges alleging environmental damage to the ocean from the annual coastal, one-day pyrotechnic display.  After Hauer stepped back relinquishing control of the event, it was saved by the formation of a grassroots group known as La Jolla Community Fireworks Foundation. Spearheaded by Deborah Marengo, LJCFF has struggled ever since to raise the approximately $60,000 — and rising — the cost of staging fireworks annually. LJVMA, the community’s business improvement district, took over the fireworks extravaganza in 2015 and had been working with Marengo to keep the event afloat. But Marengo told La Jolla Village News the formidable task of fundraising for fireworks each year has just become overwhelming. “This year we had four sponsors fall out, and I was looking at raising another $30,000 to put this (display) on,” Marengo said adding she had contract commitments that needed to be honored soon. “It’s just hard to keep going, year in and year out when you have to start fundraising all over again late in the game.” Marengo said she and others pulled out all the stops in one last-ditch attempt to secure fireworks sponsorship this year, noting, “We had a few sponsors, but not enough to make a dent.” Reacting personally to the loss of the event, Marengo said, “It’s very sad. It’s really heartbreaking. I wish there was something else that I could do, but the task just keeps getting larger and larger.” Pointing out Fourth of July is one San Diego’s biggest annual events and the largest crowd draws, Marengo added it was a “daunting task” to handle, and pay for, everything from retaining a private company to do the display, to hiring police and handling all the security necessary to make a fireworks display safe for the public. Marengo said she shouldered the burden of organizing the Cove display for several years because “it was important for me and the community. It’s really been part of our tradition. So, it’s just really sad to see that go.” Marengo summed her feelings about fireworks' fizzling in saying, “We were able to keep it going every year through lawsuits and everything. But the event … I think it’s time (end) has come.” “The annual 4th of July Fireworks event could not have made it since 2008, without the many people behind the scenes who volunteer their time,” concluded the joint letter on the event’s cancellation sent out to La Jollans. “We want to use this opportunity to thank everyone who stepped in to make the past Fourth of July events happen.” 
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    La Jolla news and community briefs
    Feb 11, 2018 | 25257 views | 0 0 comments | 11 11 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    While it may seem as though these recent lunar phenomena have become commonplace, the ‘Super Blue Blood Moon,’ as dubbed by NASA, on Jan. 31 provided contrasting hues to a crystal clear La Jolla evening. The occurrence was actually a combination of a Blue Moon, super moon and total lunar eclipse, and will not occur again until Jan. 31, 2037. / DON BALCH/VILLAGE NEWS
    While it may seem as though these recent lunar phenomena have become commonplace, the ‘Super Blue Blood Moon,’ as dubbed by NASA, on Jan. 31 provided contrasting hues to a crystal clear La Jolla evening. The occurrence was actually a combination of a Blue Moon, super moon and total lunar eclipse, and will not occur again until Jan. 31, 2037. / DON BALCH/VILLAGE NEWS
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    Ways & Means Oyster House to add La Jolla to its worldscape Ways & Means Oyster House, a Huntington Beach venue planning expansions into North Africa, Asia and the Middle East, will open on a spring date to be announced at 1251 Prospect, former home of Alfonso’s of La Jolla. Alfonso’s relocated to Solana Beach in 2017. The La Jolla location will have the same menu as its Huntington Beach and Tigard, Ore. properties, including freshly shucked oysters and grilled oysters with toppings. It will also include a selection of small plates featuring crab cake sliders, fish tacos, bacon-wrapped shrimp and lobster deviled eggs. Daily specials will also be for sale. Ways & Means has an extensive bar program, featuring private label wines and beer. Every month, two wines will be available for off-site sales through the company website (wmoysters.com) and pick-up. Ways & Means will serve lunch and dinner every day, along with a weekend brunch and a weekday afternoon happy hour. Padres Pedal the Cause provides $2.4M for cancer research Padres Pedal the Cause has donated more than $2.4 million to support cancer studies at the Salk Institute, Rady Children’s Hospital, Moores Cancer Center at UC San Diego Health and Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute. The check was presented to representatives from the four organizations on January 24 and was the largest donation ever made by the grassroots organization. Hundreds of cyclists participated in the fifth annual Pedal the Cause on Nov. 11 and 12 at Petco Park. The Salk Institute team featured 18 riders and raised nearly $25,000. Proceeds from the event support innovative cancer projects with a major emphasis on collaborative, translational research that offers a clear path to clinical trials.  “Funding from Padres Pedal the Cause is already having a big impact on our ability to understand cancer and exploit its vulnerabilities,” says Reuben Shaw, who directs the Salk Institute Cancer Center. “These resources mean cancer researchers at Salk collaborate with clinicians and researchers at UC San Diego Moores on new therapies and new insights to develop treatments of the future to root out this horrific disease.”  For the past five years, Salk has been a major partner with Pedal the Cause, on both the fundraising and research sides of the equation. “We’re fortunate to have such a strong relationship with the Salk Institute," says Pedal the Cause executive director Anne Marchand. “In addition to the work they do every day in the lab to advance cancer research in San Diego, they lead by example in supporting Padres Pedal with a dedicated team of riders and volunteers. We look forward to continuing to partner with Team Salk for years to come.” For researchers at Salk, and around San Diego's life sciences hub, the Torrey Pines mesa, this funding will support ongoing efforts to illuminate the basic biology that drives cancer and translate those findings into new therapies. To date, Padres Pedal the Cause has raised more than $7 million to fund 31 cancer research projects. One of these is Salk Assistant Professor Graham McVicker’s work on acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the most common childhood cancer. “The research grant has helped my lab and the Dixon lab at the Salk Institute catalyze a new collaborative project to study pediatric leukemia with Dennis Kuo at Rady Children’s Hospital,” says McVicker. “This is our first time working on a project together, and we are excited about the potential to make new discoveries.” Sweetfin Poké to open at Westfield UTC Founded in 2015 by fraternity brothers Seth Cohen and Brett Nestadt, Sweetfin Poké is one of LA’s most popular poke shops with seven locations now open throughout the city. This chef-driven, California inspired concept prides itself in its “Pole to Bowl” philosophy, sourcing only the highest-quality and most sustainable raw fish they can find while still maintaining a reasonable price point. Not to mention, former Top Chef contestant Dakota Weiss is its founding chef and partner. This is their first endeavor outside fo L.A. with plans to continue growing in San Diego. Their second location will be in Del Mar at the One Paseo development. The Sweetfin team is on a clear trajectory for growth with Chef Dakota on track to be one of the most commercially successful women-owned restauranteurs in Southern California with six Sweetfin locations open and operational within six months. In 2016, they received additional funding from longtime hospitality executive and "Fast Food Architect" David Swinghamer who is a founding partner at Danny Meyer's Union Square Hospitality. Grand opening on Friday, Feb. 23 at 11 a.m.: To celebrate the grand opening, they’ve partnered with local Hawaiian-style shave ice connoisseur Wailua Shave Ice to give away free shaved ice the first 200 guests who visit their UTC shop. Music, champagne and the magic of giving will come together in a classical piano recital and elegant reception benefiting San Diego Youth Services Hosted by the Daneshmand family, and featuring three-generations of their accomplished piano artistry, this memorable winter afternoon will showcase a musical program of beautiful classical pieces by world-renowned composers. The campus of Congregational Church of La Jolla will offer a beautiful and inviting backdrop for the occasion, which will take place Saturday, Feb. 3, from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. This year's musical celebration represents the fifth in a series of Daneshmand Family Performances, hosted for the benefit of nonprofit organizations dedicated to building stronger families and vibrant communities. Darya, Sahra, and Ava Daneshmand are sisters and San Diego residents. The sisters will take to the stage with their cousins, Saba and Tara, sisters who reside in Los Angeles. Performances by their father, Dr. Siamak Daneshmand, a prominent urologic oncological surgeon at the University of Southern California's Norris Cancer Center, and grandfather, Dr. Hamid Daneshmand, a periodontist, who also lives in Los Angeles, will round out the recital program. "My family is delighted to dedicate this year's recital to San Diego Youth Services, a nonprofit organization dedicated to fighting youth homelessness and youth in crisis," Ladan Daneshmand said. "Our performances offer us a wonderful opportunity to share our love of classical piano music, as well as the joy of playing together, with our audiences. Our family is also passionate about making a difference. Shining a spotlight on San Diego Youth Services, while raising awareness and funding for its important mission, brings our family performances full-circle." There is no cost to attend. Guests, however, are encouraged to make a financial contribution to San Diego Youth Services.To reserve seats, or make a contribution, visit punchbowl.com/part. UC San Diego conference to address U.S.-Mexico 'War on Drugs' The "War on Drugs" has been ongoing for several decades, yet its failure can be felt on both sides of the U.S.-Mexican border­­­­­­­­­­­­­­. In the last 16 years, the opioid epidemic has claimed close to 125,000 lives in the U.S., whereas in Mexico the war on drugs has produced an estimated 200,000 deaths and over 30,000 disappearances in the last decade. The Center for U.S.-Mexican Studies at the University of California San Diego's School of Global Policy and Strategy is hosting on Feb. 9  conference on “Rethinking the War on Drugs and U.S.-Mexico Security Cooperation” that will discuss transnational and local challenges and will seek to propose practical solutions for policymakers in the U.S. and Mexico. “The cooperation of the U.S. and Mexico is more critical now than ever,” said Rafael Fernández de Castro, director of the Center for U.S.-Mexican Studies. “In recent months, the U.S. has publicly embraced unilateral policies to cross-border challenges while Mexico has de-prioritized security issues. As the two countries have turned away from bilateral cooperation, the complex and region-wide factors driving and exacerbating the U.S and Mexico's most pressing security issues have continued unabated.” From a former White House advisor to former directors of Mexico’s intelligence agencies and members of the national media, the conference participants also include top policymakers and scholars from both sides of the border. The panelists’ topics will evaluate Mexico’s many forms of victimization, examine region-wide factors for the resurgence of violence and the status of current U.S.-Mexico security cooperation. “This conference is especially timely with the upcoming elections in Mexico and we hope the event can propose solutions for key stakeholders,” said Cecilia Farfán-Méndez, a visiting fellow at the Center for U.S.-Mexican Studies. “Our goal is to propose a new framework beyond the Mérida Initiative that truly privileges cooperation and shared responsibility rather than confrontation between the U.S. and Mexico." The daylong conference is free and open to the public and will take place from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., on Feb. 9 at the Village Building 2, located on the UC San Diego campus. San Diego Unified middle schools to participate in musical theater program sponsored by La Jolla Playhouse Middle school students in the San Diego Unified School District may be one step closer to their big break. The JumpStart Theatre Program is accepting applications from district middle schools to participate in a three-year, fully-funded musical theater program sponsored by La Jolla Playhouse and the Educational Theatre Association (EdTA). Three district middle schools will be selected to participate in the program during the 2018-19 school year, giving non-theater teachers the skills, support and resources necessary to produce their campus’s first musical through a proven combination of hands-on mentoring and boot-camp style training. This opportunity will expand access to the arts for many San Diego Unified students, underscoring the district’s ongoing commitment to arts education. La Jolla Playhouse was chosen as one of two theater companies in the country to spearhead the national expansion of the highly successful JumpStart Theatre Program, established in 2014 by the Educational Theatre Association in Cincinnati. La Jolla Playhouse has long established itself as an advocate of arts education, through such programs as the Performing Outreach Program Tour and the Young Performers series of summer theater training programs. "We are thrilled to have JumpStart Theatre come to San Diego Unified. What a terrific opportunity for our middle school students to not only have an arts experience but to develop their 21st-century skills,” said San Diego Unified Superintendent Cindy Marten. “We know JumpStart Theatre will continue our vision to transform lives through the arts. Thank you to our great local community partner, La Jolla Playhouse, and to the Educational Theatre Association." The application is open to all San Diego Unified middle schools. Applications are due Feb. 23. Selection criteria includes the commitment of a minimum of three educators from each school who will remain dedicated to the program for the duration. Previous theater experience is not required. Schools will be mentored by La Jolla Playhouse teaching artists throughout the entire program with the goal of building a sustainable, long-term musical theatre curriculum. "We are honored to be one of the inaugural regional partners for EdTA’s JumpStart Theatre program. La Jolla Playhouse is known for – and deeply committed to – the development of new plays and musicals, and the JumpStart Theatre Program provides a terrific proven method of empowering teachers to produce musicals in their middle schools,” said La Jolla Playhouse Managing Director Michael S. Rosenberg. “The opportunity to partner with EdTA and San Diego Unified in bringing the joy of musical theater to students and teachers in our community while building life skills through participation in the arts, could not be a better fit for La Jolla Playhouse.” ‘Your money’s no good’ at Tender Greens venues Your paper money is no longer acceptable at Tender Greens, a fast-casual fare venue that operates in the UTC area, Liberty Station, Mission Valley and downtown San Diego.  Company officials say the move is a response to technological advances and the need to save time. They add that the change is better for the environment amid the lack of need for paper deposit slips and for visits by armored trucks. The credit, debit and mobile payment set-up were tested successfully at the restaurant’s El Segundo outlet. This month, the restaurant is also touting a digital gift card feature on its mobile app. Starbucks in Seattle is considering a similar cashless program. - Martin J. Westlin
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    Local photographer and artisan open joint venture on Fay Ave.
    by BLAKE BUNCH
    Feb 09, 2018 | 12004 views | 0 0 comments | 19 19 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    ‘Salk Autumnal Equinox’ is a prime example of the photographer’s work. / EVGENY YOROBE
    ‘Salk Autumnal Equinox’ is a prime example of the photographer’s work. / EVGENY YOROBE
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    If you have a social media account in San Diego, odds are high that you have seen photographer Evgeny Yorobe’s work. His ethereal depictions of some of the most iconic locations throughout the city are frequently shared at a higher-than-average frequency. Yorobe, a San Diego native, has now partnered with craftsman Will Waters to open a new studio at 7660 Fay Ave. Their grand opening will be held on Saturday, Feb. 10 from 5 to 10 p.m. in conjunction with the La Jolla Art Walk. This is not Yorobe and Water’s first cooperative business effort, however, as the two have worked together over the past three years at the Little Italy and La Jolla farmers markets. Waters’ specialty is high-quality woodwork (Creations By Will). At the studio, one front corner is dedicated to his custom-designed shaving kits. From razors, bowls and brushes, to all-natural shave soaps and after-shaves, his aim is to bring back what he refers to as “the art of shaving” without breaking the bank. His early work was a direct result of serving in the Navy. “When I was in the service, we had to shave every day,” said Waters. “And honestly, I was highly disappointed with what was offered. That’s when I began to do some research, producing my own safety razors. Now, we sell similar razors starting at $40.” Yorobe has close ties to the area. Not only is Scripps Pier, ever popular among photographers (and one of his favorites), within close proximity, but he learned his craft while studying at the University of California San Diego. The light entering their bright studio highlights familiar golden-hour captures of Broken Hill, the Windsansea shack, the Cove, Salk Institute and much more. The photographer’s work is available in a variety of mediums: matte-board paper prints start at $40, then move up in size to around $100. It is perhaps his de-sublimated prints, available on either acrylic or metal, that set the artist’s individual or tryptic pieces apart from all other local photographers. “I have a lab in Scripps Ranch where the larger prints are produced,” said Yorobe. “But with the paper/matte board prints, I can print them right out of the back office in our studio.” Discussing his shot of Scripps Pier, where two times a year the sun lines up perfectly between pilings at sunset, Water and Yorobe wax philosophical. “It’s really great because it can be a little moody and at times dark, but is always beautiful,” Yorobe says. “Every pier is different here, and it’s interesting to see,” said Waters. “Whereas Crystal Pier could see a lot more activity, at Scripps it’s always serene and peaceful – they’re all different.” One question could remain, however. How did the two assimilate to businesses that, on the surface, may not make sense to some. Yorobe and Waters would view the contrary. Both of them are fine artists, and while Yorobe’s visuals may supplement Waters’ craftsmanship and vice versa, their new venture sees them working together in what was seemingly a “Eureka!” moment. “I’m currently working on some entry tables that take into account Evgeny’s compositions,” said Waters. “This has been the most forefront of our collaboration.” The two artists say that they will be incrementally placing new pieces throughout the space as time unfolds. For more information, visit sandiego-landscapes.com, or call 858-467-0952. Also, visit CreationsByWill.com or call 760-835-1853.
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    Day wins Farmers Insurance Open in playoff; Tiger’s comeback draws huge galleries
    Feb 01, 2018 | 25223 views | 0 0 comments | 22 22 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Tiger Woods his out of the rough on hole No. 4  during his round on Sunday, Jan. 28 at the Farmers Insurance Open at Torrey Pines in La Jolla. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Tiger Woods his out of the rough on hole No. 4 during his round on Sunday, Jan. 28 at the Farmers Insurance Open at Torrey Pines in La Jolla. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    Tiger Woods reads a putt on hole No. 5  during his round on Sunday, Jan. 28 at the Farmers Insurance Open at Torrey Pines in La Jolla. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Tiger Woods reads a putt on hole No. 5 during his round on Sunday, Jan. 28 at the Farmers Insurance Open at Torrey Pines in La Jolla. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    Tiger Woods tees off during his round on Sunday, Jan. 28 at the Farmers Insurance Open at Torrey Pines in La Jolla. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Tiger Woods tees off during his round on Sunday, Jan. 28 at the Farmers Insurance Open at Torrey Pines in La Jolla. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    Tiger Woods hits out of the rough during his round on Sunday, Jan. 28 at the Farmers Insurance Open at Torrey Pines in La Jolla. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Tiger Woods hits out of the rough during his round on Sunday, Jan. 28 at the Farmers Insurance Open at Torrey Pines in La Jolla. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    Tiger Woods reads a putt on No. 5 during his round on Sunday, Jan. 28 at the Farmers Insurance Open at Torrey Pines in La Jolla. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Tiger Woods reads a putt on No. 5 during his round on Sunday, Jan. 28 at the Farmers Insurance Open at Torrey Pines in La Jolla. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    Tiger Woods tries to use body english to keep a drive in the fairway during his round on Sunday, Jan. 28 at the Farmers Insurance Open at Torrey Pines in La Jolla. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Tiger Woods tries to use body english to keep a drive in the fairway during his round on Sunday, Jan. 28 at the Farmers Insurance Open at Torrey Pines in La Jolla. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    Tiger Woods fans watch his final round on Sunday, Jan. 28 at the Farmers Insurance Open at Torrey Pines in La Jolla. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Tiger Woods fans watch his final round on Sunday, Jan. 28 at the Farmers Insurance Open at Torrey Pines in La Jolla. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    Tiger Woods and his bunker shadow hit a shot in the fairway during his round on Sunday, Jan. 28 at the Farmers Insurance Open at Torrey Pines in La Jolla. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Tiger Woods and his bunker shadow hit a shot in the fairway during his round on Sunday, Jan. 28 at the Farmers Insurance Open at Torrey Pines in La Jolla. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    Tiger Woods fans watch his round on Sunday, Jan. 28 at the Farmers Insurance Open at Torrey Pines in La Jolla. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Tiger Woods fans watch his round on Sunday, Jan. 28 at the Farmers Insurance Open at Torrey Pines in La Jolla. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    Tiger Woods tees off during his round on Sunday, Jan. 28 at the Farmers Insurance Open at Torrey Pines in La Jolla. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Tiger Woods tees off during his round on Sunday, Jan. 28 at the Farmers Insurance Open at Torrey Pines in La Jolla. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    Tiger Woods shakes the hand of playing partner Hideki Matsuyama on the No. 9 hole after finishing his round on Sunday, Jan. 28 at the Farmers Insurance Open at Torrey Pines in La Jolla. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Tiger Woods shakes the hand of playing partner Hideki Matsuyama on the No. 9 hole after finishing his round on Sunday, Jan. 28 at the Farmers Insurance Open at Torrey Pines in La Jolla. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    Jason Day sank an 18-inch birdie putt on the sixth playoff hole to beat Alex Noren and win the Farmers Insurance Open at Torrey Pines on Monday, Jan. 29. Day and Noren had to return after grinding through five playoff holes Sunday before it got too dark to continue. They played the par-5 18th on Monday morning, their fourth time visiting the finishing hole in the playoff. Tiger Woods, who had to rally on his back nine on Friday to make the cut, finished his up-and-down final round early on Sunday by shooting even par. Woods, who consistently had huge galleries and TV cameras following him throughout the weekend, finished the tournament at 3 under, 7 strokes off the lead. On Monday, Day teed off at 8:04 a.m. and sank the winning putt 13 minutes later, his fourth birdie on the par-5 hole in the playoff. It was Day's 11th PGA Tour win of his career, and first since the 2016 Players Championship. He moved to No. 9 in the FedExCup standings. His victory was accompanied only by the sounds of camera shutters and cheers from Day's family members. Spectators weren't allowed in because organizers said they didn't have time to arrange for security. Noren tried an aggressive second shot from the first cut, but his ball landed short of the green and rolled into Devlin's Billabong, a pond that protects the hole. The Swede moved to 34th in the FedExCup standings with his career-best TOUR finish. Day, meanwhile, hit his second shot out of the rough and over some trees onto the fairway before hitting a beautiful approach shot that set up the winning putt. Noren bogeyed the hole. "It's been a long time coming," said Day. He had a dreadful 2017, which included his mother recovering from lung cancer and a game that lost some discipline and focus. Noren, 35, was trying for his first PGA TOUR win. The Swede, who played at Oklahoma State, has nine victories on the European Tour, including four in 2016. He is No. 19 in the world ranking. It was the longest playoff in the tournament's 67-year history. Day and Noren matched each other with birdie, birdie, par, par and birdie through five playoff holes in the twilight Sunday on the blufftop course overlooking the Pacific Ocean. Ryan Palmer was eliminated on the first extra hole with a par.
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    High surf advisory affects coastal communities in San Diego
    Jan 18, 2018 | 28670 views | 0 0 comments | 39 39 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Kylie Dixon, of Clairemont, checks out a huge wave splashing over a cliff near The Arch at Sunset Cliffs in Point Loma on Thursday, Jan. 18. Dixon, a Mesa College student, was celebrating her birthday with a walk at Sunset Cliffs. THOMAS MELVILLE / PENINSULA BEACON
    Kylie Dixon, of Clairemont, checks out a huge wave splashing over a cliff near The Arch at Sunset Cliffs in Point Loma on Thursday, Jan. 18. Dixon, a Mesa College student, was celebrating her birthday with a walk at Sunset Cliffs. THOMAS MELVILLE / PENINSULA BEACON
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    A huge wave cashes into Sunset Cliffs on Thursday, Jan. 18. THOMAS MELVILLE / PENINSULA BEACON
    A huge wave cashes into Sunset Cliffs on Thursday, Jan. 18. THOMAS MELVILLE / PENINSULA BEACON
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    Two young women enjoy the sun and watch the huge surf rolling in at Sunset Cliffs in Point Loma on Thursday, Jan. 18. THOMAS MELVILLE / PENINSULA BEACON
    Two young women enjoy the sun and watch the huge surf rolling in at Sunset Cliffs in Point Loma on Thursday, Jan. 18. THOMAS MELVILLE / PENINSULA BEACON
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    Max, visiting from Sweden, gets walloped by a massive wave while trying to enter the ocean to surf at Sunset Cliffs in Point Loma on Jan. 18. THOMAS MELVILLE / PENINSULA BEACON
    Max, visiting from Sweden, gets walloped by a massive wave while trying to enter the ocean to surf at Sunset Cliffs in Point Loma on Jan. 18. THOMAS MELVILLE / PENINSULA BEACON
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    Max, visiting from Sweden, jumps into the ocean to surf at Sunset Cliffs in Point Loma on Jan. 18. THOMAS MELVILLE / PENINSULA BEACON
    Max, visiting from Sweden, jumps into the ocean to surf at Sunset Cliffs in Point Loma on Jan. 18. THOMAS MELVILLE / PENINSULA BEACON
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    Kylie Dixon, of Clairemont, watched a giant wave splash near The Arch at Sunset Cliffs in Point Loma on Jan. 18. THOMAS MELVILLE / PENINSULA BEACON
    Kylie Dixon, of Clairemont, watched a giant wave splash near The Arch at Sunset Cliffs in Point Loma on Jan. 18. THOMAS MELVILLE / PENINSULA BEACON
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    Visitors dodge a massive wave crashing into Sunset Cliffs on Thursday, Jan. 18. THOMAS MELVILLE / PENINSULA BEACON
    Visitors dodge a massive wave crashing into Sunset Cliffs on Thursday, Jan. 18. THOMAS MELVILLE / PENINSULA BEACON
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    A surfer is swamped by a huge wave as he tries to enter the ocean at Garbage Beach at Sunset Cliffs on Jan. 18. THOMAS MELVILLE / PENINSULA BEACON
    A surfer is swamped by a huge wave as he tries to enter the ocean at Garbage Beach at Sunset Cliffs on Jan. 18. THOMAS MELVILLE / PENINSULA BEACON
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    A large northwest swell producing large surf will fade into the late afternoon on Thursday, Jan. 18. A new northwest swell will increase the surf again Thursday night, peak Friday, and then gradually diminish late Saturday. Surf will will reach 7 feet high Thursday. Then on Friday, waves will be 5-10 feet high with sets up to 12 feet high through evening. On Saturday, waves will be 4-8 feet high with sets to 10 feet high. The highest surf will occur in southern San Diego County and northern Orange County. A high surf advisory means that high surf will affect beaches in the advisory area, producing rip currents, beach erosion and dangerous swimming conditions. Expect waves overtopping jetties and coastal rocks as well as sneaker waves. There may be some minor coastal flooding during high tides.
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    full story
    Pacific Beach family dedicates business to helping Promises2Kids
    While she identifies first and foremost as a mother, others see Carrie Miller as a one-of-a-kind philanthropist. Seven years ago, in honor of her oldest daughter Evelyn’s first birthday, Miller and...
    Published - Thursday, February 08
    full story
    City breaks ground for new Rose Creek Bikeway
    Pacific Beach will be a new link in the chain of the city’s interlocking bicycle network once the Rose Creek Bikeway is completed. Officials from the San Diego Association of Governments and the Ci...
    Published - Wednesday, February 07
    full story
    ‘Chameleon Bandit’ convicted of robbing Point Loma bank
    A jury Monday convicted a man who was nicknamed the “Chameleon Bandit” of robbing two tellers at a Point Loma bank as well as holding up nine other tellers in other banks. The eight woman, four man...
    Published - Tuesday, February 06
    full story
    Point Loma Nazarene’s rugby club may be little, but they are fierce
    There’s a no-name school from a no-name league that beat Stanford University in rugby this year during a friendly match, and is looking to make it to the national tournament for the third time in t...
    Published - Tuesday, February 06
    full story
    Opinion: Bicycle riders prohibited and cause major damage at Sunset Cliffs Natural Park
    Dear Editor: Thank you for the lengthy article in the recent Beacon regarding Sunset Cliffs Natural Park. Gene Berger, chairman of the Sunset Cliffs Natural Park Council, told us about all the dog ...
    Published - Monday, February 05
    full story
    Campland on the Bay hits highest occupancy level in 10 years
    Campland on the Bay, one of Mission Bay’s original lessees, achieved higher occupancy and revenue in 2017 than in any prior year since 2006. Last year, Campland generated $2.8 million in city rent ...
    Published - Monday, February 05
    full story
    Pedestrian struck on Chatsworth Boulevard
    A man was hospitalized Feb. 3 after he apparently walked out in front of a car in the Loma Portal neighborhood of Point Loma. At about 9:45 p.m. Saturday, a 31-year-old man stepped out in front of ...
    Published - Monday, February 05
    full story
    UC San Diego launches new bike-share program
    UC San Diego has launched a new bike-share program, which could revolutionize how faculty, students, and staff get around campus. The initiative is a collaboration between UC San Diego and Spin, a ...
    Published - Monday, February 05
    full story
    OB Mardi Gras brings the party to Winston’s
    A taste of New Orleans comes to Ocean Beach on Feb. 10, when the inaugural OB Mardi Gras takes place at Winston’s. Organized by Ric Lee, of Bayou Brothers Productions and OB native Paul Bolton, wit...
    Published - Saturday, February 03
    full story
    Current Issues(Archives)
    The Peninsula Beacon, February 15th, 2018
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    The Peninsula Beacon, February 15th, 2018
    La Jolla Village News, February 9th, 2018
    download La Jolla Village News, February 9th, 2018
    La Jolla Village News, February 9th, 2018
    Beach & Bay Press, February 8th, 2018
    download Beach & Bay Press, February 8th, 2018
    Beach & Bay Press, February 8th, 2018
    The Peninsula Beacon, February 1st, 2018
    download The Peninsula Beacon, February 1st, 2018
    The Peninsula Beacon, February 1st, 2018