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    Globe-circling tandem bikers stop at UC San Diego
    by KENDRA SITTON
    Apr 25, 2019 | 2991 views | 0 0 comments | 6 6 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Lloyd Snellgrove (left) and Louis Collier pose inside UC San Diego’s spinal cord injury labs with the tandem bike they have ridden around the world. / Photo by Kendra Sitton
    Lloyd Snellgrove (left) and Louis Collier pose inside UC San Diego’s spinal cord injury labs with the tandem bike they have ridden around the world. / Photo by Kendra Sitton
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    A tandem bike might be a rare sight on San Diego’s busiest streets on any given day, but a tandem bike loaded with a year’s worth of supplies and carrying the dirt of roads from Australia, Morocco and Miami would be downright extraordinary. On April 7-8, that is exactly what happened. British doctors Lloyd Collier and Louis Snellgrove could be spotted in downtown on their shared bicycle as they headed north to UC San Diego. Their pitstop here happened as they attempt to break the world record for circumnavigating the globe on a tandem bicycle after setting off from Adelaide, Australia in August 2018. They are riding through 23 countries and covering 18,000 miles in their efforts to break the record and in the hopes of raising $50,000 for the charities Spinal Research and the Brain Foundation. Their efforts to fund research are what brought them to the spinal cord injury labs at UC San Diego, where they met with professors Mark Tuszynski and Binhai Zheng, who have previously been supported by Spinal Research. Collier and Snellgrove worked in emergency rooms for years, where they saw the devastation a spinal cord or brain injury can cause. “If it wasn’t for these [UC San Diego researchers], then we can’t provide any treatments. Spinal cord injuries and brain injuries are so limited at the moment. There’s lots of high-tech treatment for cancers and all sorts of heart problems, but traumatic brain and spine injuries, once you’ve got them, there’s very limited amount that you can done so you really need more money, more research into these conditions to help find cures in the future,” Snellgrove said. “[Tuszynski and Zheng] are really passionate about what they do. It reinforces and justifies our decision to give up so much of our time to try and raise money for them too,” Collier said. The two men took a year-long break from their careers and have self-funded the trip. All money raised goes directly into the two charities. “We are extremely grateful to Lloyd and Louis for undertaking this monumental challenge in aid of Spinal Research. The awareness they will raise, and the much-needed funds will go a long way to changing the future of spinal cord injury,” said Dr. Mark Bacon, executive and scientific director of Spinal Research. For Collier, this trip has been a long-time dream as a way to support his Uncle Alan, who was confined to a wheelchair after a spinal injury at work when he was 29 years old – the same age Collier is now. His esteemed male role model died in March 2018, and his death was one of the main catalysts for leaving. “I’ve always wanted to do it; I just never had the balls to do it. I always wanted to do it for him, for spinal research because I loved him so much,” Collier said. While love for his uncle was Collier’s inspiration, Snellgrove has always been inspired by early explorers and seeing patients’ lives cut short made him realize life is too short not to make the most of opportunities. When Collier asked friends and fellow doctors to join him on the journey, Snellgrove jumped on the possibility. “My inspirations growing up were the olden-day explorers who would go off to Antarctica, the North Pole, or sail the seven seas and discover worlds people didn’t really know about. These days everything’s really been discovered,” he said. “You can’t really have adventures like they used to do, but to bike around the world is the next best thing. You discover things that you can only see on a bicycle.” After agreeing to bike around the world, the pair then decided to take a tandem. Snellgrove joked, “Lloyd is fitter than I am, so I thought on a tandem he can’t cycle off. I can just sit there and not peddle.” “Tandem is the next best decision after deciding to do it in the first place,” Collier said. He said it made people ask questions like “why are these two white fellas riding through India on a tandem?” Curious people have also contributed to their fundraiser after hearing about why they are on a tandem bike. “What we love about Americans is that they’re very open and very intrigued to know what you’re doing. That has led to a lot of people donating,” Snellgrove said. “Americans are excellent for that.” One of the longest legs of their journey was spent in the U.S. after they landed in Miami, then rode to San Diego, and then to San Francisco before finally flying to Europe. While they did not cook over an open fire in areas with a wildfire risk, for most of their journey they would cycle for 60 miles, before pitching a tent, collecting firewood, and cooking their dinner. This method of travel means they have camped in snow as well as in the desert. “You name it, we’ve slept there,” Collier said, with Snellgrove saying the list includes churches, mosques, train stations, city parks, beaches, abandoned buildings, swamps, and even a 30-year-old school bus in the U.S. Their travels have also included many other adventures, some more terrifying than exciting. “We’ve been robbed at knife-point in our tent in the Gobi Desert. We were hit by a truck on our first day. We came face-to-face with an eastern Siberian brown bear,” Collier said and added they were also confronted by military police in Turkey. “There were times where the bike was falling to pieces and we were in the middle of India and we had no hope of sorting out our problems because some of the parts are quite unique,” Snellgrove said. “We’ve met ambassadors, and we’ve been through the slums of India.” They both agreed some of the contrasts in the places they had seen around the world are what made the adventure so interesting. Collier pointed to the difference between the slums of India and suburbs of Florida. “[I had] never seen such wealth – houses the size of castles,” he said. “One extreme to the other.” One place they looked forward to visiting was San Diego, which neither of them had ever been to before. “We’ve been to thousands of places now all around the world, and San Diego’s one of the places we knew about and heard about before coming here, so we were very keen to see it,” Snellgrove said. “It’s very multicultural.” “It’s on the coast. You see incredible engineering in the naval ships. You’ve got world-leading research centers. Historic towns. Beautiful stadiums. Nice parks. You’ve got good sports teams. You’ve got modern infrastructure,” Collier said. “So I think to combine that all in one spot, in one place is one of the better cities we’ve been through so far. It’s just such a mix in such a small place. It is bloody nice.” The latest stops on their adventure can be seen in their daily Instagram posts @worldtandem or on their weekly blog post on their website. More information on their journey, as well as how to donate, may be found at worldtandem.com.
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    City Council votes to regulate scooters – focus on slower speeds, more rider education and public safety
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Apr 24, 2019 | 9148 views | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Scooters are lined up in a parking lot as scooter riders head south on Sunset Cliffs Boulevard on Saturday, April 20.   THOMAS MELVILLE / PENINSULA BEACON
    Scooters are lined up in a parking lot as scooter riders head south on Sunset Cliffs Boulevard on Saturday, April 20. THOMAS MELVILLE / PENINSULA BEACON
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    Days before the full council hearing on new scooter regulations, a well-attended public protest sponsored by Mission Beach Town Council was held on Mission Beach boardwalk. / Photo by Dave Schwab
    Days before the full council hearing on new scooter regulations, a well-attended public protest sponsored by Mission Beach Town Council was held on Mission Beach boardwalk. / Photo by Dave Schwab
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    The City Council voted unanimously in favor of new regulations for electric scooters and other shared-mobility devices instituting fees for operators, decreasing allowed speeds and designating where they can park. Regulations the City Council approved April 23 decrease the allowable speed of dockless scooters from 15 to 8 mph in high-traffic areas with the use of geofencing technology to limit speeds. Scooters are to be banned from parking near hospitals, schools, boardwalks and near Petco Park. Greg Block, of the mayor’s office, testified scooters and similar devices are to be regulated in six ways: by being permitted, limiting their speeds, paying fees, parking in designated “corrals,” indemnifying the City against liability and sharing data.  Key components of the regulations include: ·Speed limits: In specific geofenced areas, operators will slow scooters to 8 mph. Three of the geofenced areas are pedestrian-only and operators will slow scooters to 3 mph with a push message notifying riders to leave that area. ·Geofencing will be in effect for beach-area boardwalks, Balboa Park, NTC Park, Mission Bay Park, Petco Park and the pedestrian-only locations, including North/South Embarcadero, MLK Jr. Promenade, and La Piazza della Famiglia. ·Staging: Operators will no longer be able to stage scooters and e-bikes on sidewalks in downtown. The City has identified – and is currently installing – 330 on-street dockless parking corrals throughout downtown where staging is allowed. ·In the beach areas, operators are only permitted to stage in groups of up to four, with 40 feet in between each group. The City will identify corral locations in the beach areas and, once installed, will require their use.The City also will conduct an evaluation of locations throughout San Diego where designated parking corrals would be beneficial and, working with the City Council and communities, install more. ·Rider parking: Operators will prohibit riders from ending a ride in specific geofenced areas, including beach area boardwalks. ·Education: Consistent messages about local and state laws in smartphone applications will be required. As will on-device labeling about age requirements and how riding on the sidewalk is illegal. ·Per device fee: A per device fee of $150 annually will be assessed. A reduction of $15 per device will be offered for operators offering a qualified equity program. ·Equity programs may include discounts, equitable distribution, credit-card free unlock or mobile-device free unlock. ·Data sharing: A variety of data will be shared about ridership, parking, paths of travel and more to assist the City in transportation planning, Climate Action Plan reporting and enforcement. ·Indemnification/insurance: Operators will be required to indemnify the City from liability and to hold a $2 million per occurrence, $4 million aggregate and $4 million umbrella insurance policy. ·Performance bond: Each operator will be required to pay a “Safety Deposit” – $65 for each device in fleet – to be held in the event the company leaves the market without its devices.  The ordinance will charge dockless companies an annual $150 per-device fee. The City noted that should act as a de facto cap on scooter numbers. “The sheer number of children on scooters is alarming, is this child endangerment?,” asked Mission Beach restaurateur Sara Mattinson asked councilmembers. “We have been taken over by scooters,” claimed Eve Anderson of Pacific Beach, arguing six scooter companies now is too many. “Is it us or them?” asked Matt Gardner, a brick-and-mortar vehicle rental owner and Mission Beach Town Council president, whose business is being hurt by scooter competition. Bicycling advocate Andy Hanshaw said his number one message is, “We need to build out our bike infrastructure and separate bikes, and now scooters (from cars) to allow riders the choice to be off the sidewalk.” Scooter representatives testified they mostly favored regulation, while imploring the City to include them in working out the details. “Public safety is the number one responsibility of local government,” said Council president pro tem Barbara Bry. “Other cities have been much more proactive than we’ve been.” Bry requested an amendment to the ordinance banning dockless on boardwalks, but was told it would have to be dealt with later because it wasn’t noticed. “If we could do a rewind, I would have banned this entire thing from the city from the start without regulation,” said District 2 Councilmember Dr. Jen Campbell. “We need to think ahead. Now we have to move forward. It is way past time that we pass regulations. These devices are a threat to our public health for riders and walkers, and I support banning them from boardwalks and sidewalks.” Days before the full council hearing on new scooter regulations, a well-attended public protest sponsored by Mission Beach Town Council was held on Mission Beach boardwalk. Ralliers chanted “safety not scooters” while railing against unregulated dockless vehicles. “We don’t feel it is safe just to go for a bike ride or walk our dogs,” said MBTC vice president Greg Knight. “This doesn’t just affect Mission Beach but every community in San Diego. Motorized vehicles and pedestrians simply don’t mix. We can’t take it anymore.” Jonathan Freeman, a downtown ADA activist, spoke of solidarity citywide concerning scooters. “We have exactly the same problems: It’s no longer safe for people to walk on a sidewalk or boardwalk,” said Freeman. … No motorized vehicles should ever be traveling on them. People here are seeing their communities destroyed by people willfully disregarding their safety. This must not continue.” Electric scooters and bikes are prohibited from riding on city sidewalks. “We got shut down last year 6-3 (City Council vote) on a (boardwalk scooter) ban request,” noted MBTC vice president Klaus Mendenhall. “How is it the City is allowing companies to use our public sidewalks for profit without paying fees?” “We are assisting people who’ve been injured or hurt in scooter accidents,” said attorney Mike O’Neill, who’s filed lawsuits against the City representing injured scooter riders. “The only way to get our City’s attention is to hit them in the pocketbook.”
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    Merchants Association discusses Concours d’Elegance weekend, Enjoya La Jolla
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Apr 19, 2019 | 19931 views | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Young women hang out in a 1929 Packard 645 Dual Cowl Phaeton at Concours d’Elegance, which featured more than 100 classic and exotic cars on Scripps Park lawn last weekend. / THOMAS MELVILLE / VILLAGE NEWS
    Young women hang out in a 1929 Packard 645 Dual Cowl Phaeton at Concours d’Elegance, which featured more than 100 classic and exotic cars on Scripps Park lawn last weekend. / THOMAS MELVILLE / VILLAGE NEWS
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    In April, while preparing for Concours d’Elegance weekend, La Jolla Village Merchants Association vetted ways to capitalize on the signature special event. Merchants also re-introduced Enjoya La Jolla, a new monthly Saturday twilight promotional event debuting in May.  The 15th annual Concours d’Elegance that featured more than 100 classic and exotic cars on Scripps Park lawn April 14-16 headlined discussion at the LJVMA’s April 10 meeting. “This event is hugely important for everyone,” noted LJVMA president Brett Murphy.  Executive director Jodi Rudick said an LJVMA program, Break in the Village, was being held in conjunction with the Concours to promote the Village. “We had 80 merchants signed up to engage in the event, and each of them committed to doing something special in their stores with free refreshments, special discounts, gifts, etc.,” she said. “There are nine places throughout the Village where there’s going to be music happening, along with merchant outreach doing LJVMA-branded balloons and bags.” Following the Concours, LJVMA president Brett Murphy said: “The event, the weekend, and the week were extremely successful for all involved. I was amazed at the participation from our merchants and the turnout at the Concours d’Elegance. It was a huge success.” Added Murphy: “I truly believe it will be an incredible jump-off point for the upcoming Enjoya La Jolla event in May. We have gone to an aggressive offensive approach through advertising, marketing and, most importantly, relationship building to provide tremendous value for our merchants. This past weekend was a first-hand look at what can be done when we work together as a positive and cohesive unit.” Enjoya La Jolla sunset sip, shop and stroll events will be held on second Saturdays. The inaugural event will take place May 11 from 3 to 7 p.m. throughout the Village. Like its precursor, La Jolla Nights, a quarterly celebration of Prospect Street's arts, eats and and shops held in 2015-16, Enjoya La Jolla visitors will receive a “passport” from participating merchants. That passport will grant guests special offers, refreshments and contests. Completed passports will be returned and entered into a contest to win a La Jolla weekend package. Enjoya La Jolla will include street performers entertaining, as well as free parking courtesy of Ace Parking at 888 Prospect St. In other action • LJVMA board member Robert Mackey of La Jolla Golf Carts volunteered to replace Aaron Goulding as the merchant board’s representative on the Traffic and Transportation Subcommittee of the La Jolla Community Planning Association. • Council staffer Mauricio Medina noted District 1 Councilwoman Barbara Bry is hosting a budget town hall Saturday, May 6 from 10 to 11:30 a.m. at La Jolla Village Square Community Room, 8657 Villa La Jolla Drive. RSVP required to BarbaraBry@sandiego.gov.  • Pointing out “not more than 10 percent” of a business improvement district’s annual budget can be carried over to the next year, Rudick in her financial report noted LJVMA is in good shape. “We have a lot of budget to work with,” she said.
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    La Jolla’s first all-girl Boy Scout troop hikes Pacific Crest Trail 
    by EMILY BLACKWOOD
    Apr 17, 2019 | 9059 views | 5 5 comments | 22 22 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Some of the girls of Troop 506g. / Courtesy photo 
    Some of the girls of Troop 506g. / Courtesy photo 
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    Last year, the Boy Scouts of America announced it would allow girls into the troops as a part of its rebranding efforts to transform into Scouts BSA. On Feb. 11, La Jolla Troop 506 became a part of this national change by holding its first informational meeting at La Jolla United Methodist Church. Since then, eight girls have joined Scouting BSA (Boy Scouts of America) Girl’s Troop 506g and five of them just returned from their first backpacking trip. Troop 506, sponsored by the La Jolla United Methodist Church, went on a two-day, 9-mile hike along the Pacific Crest Trail in the Warner Springs area on April 13. Scoutmaster Marne Stransky – who got involved in the Boy Scouts after her son joined – said that they learned things like orienting a map, using a compass, filtering water from streams, building rain structures, and starting a fire, which turned out to be a challenge.  “Their perseverance was incredible,” she said, smiling. “They did not give up." She said the scouts were so enthusiastic about the trip that some of them even asked to be woken up at 5:30 a.m. to see the sunrise.  “It was a bonding experience for them,” Stransky said. “I have a really good group of girls." One of the driving factors in starting this troop was not only to include girls so they have more opportunities but to make it easier on parents who traditionally have had only one child in the troop and not the other.  After all, what one sibling does, the other wants to do too; which is exactly how 13-year-old Charlotte Norton first got involved.  “I’ve tagged along with my brother a lot, so I know how fun the trips are. I don’t really want to tag along anymore. I want to be apart of the troop.”   “Our troop has always been family-oriented,” said Stransky, who added that siblings and family members have always been invited to go on different outings. “The difference here is that they can enter the actual program and earn their ranks.”  While BSA membership has declined since its peak five decades ago – The Washington Post reported a membership of four million boys in 1910 and a membership of 2.3 million boys in 2018 – Troop 506 has 53 members according to assistant scoutmaster Marc Jaffe. He claims it’s because of the troop’s high-adventure activities that include everything from backpacking and rafting in Montana to horseback riding in Temecula. “We have a very healthy troop,” he said. “And the reason is because we’re active. And we’re in California, so we can do things year-round.” So active in fact, that they’re already planning their next activity. Outings for 2019 currently include horseback riding, canoeing, and other wilderness backpacking adventures. For more information about Scouting BSA (Boy Scouts of America) Girl’s Troop 506g, call Stransky at 619-204-8194 or come to one of their meetings, held every Monday at 6:30 p.m., at La Jolla United Methodist Church. 
    Comments
    (5)
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    Marc J.
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    April 19, 2019
    Troop 506 has both a boy's troop and a girl's troop. Scouting BSA also has a co-ed program for older youth called Venture Scouting.
    MegFid
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    April 18, 2019
    The girls are not Boy Scouts. How about first female Scouting BSA troop in the title instead of still considering them Boy Scouts. Labels matter!
    Bill F
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    April 19, 2019
    Of course they are, otherwise they would be Girl Scouts ;)

    The official title is Scouts, BSA; so sure your title is close enough.
    Gary Huber
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    April 18, 2019
    So what happens if a boy wants to join the all-girl Boy Scout troop?
    Troy A
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    April 19, 2019
    All hell breaks loose.
    Unique Airbnb Experience lets you be a mermaid for a day in La Jolla
    by EMILY BLACKWOOD
    Apr 17, 2019 | 6468 views | 3 3 comments | 15 15 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    How would you like to be a mermaid for a day?  
    How would you like to be a mermaid for a day?  
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    Shannon Subers hosts an Airbnb Experience conducting mermaid photoshoots in La Jolla. / Photos Courtesy of Shannon Subers
    Shannon Subers hosts an Airbnb Experience conducting mermaid photoshoots in La Jolla. / Photos Courtesy of Shannon Subers
    slideshow
    Shannon Subers always dreamed of being a mermaid.  Like most kids who grew up on classic Disney movies, her fantasy started with Ariel and “The Little Mermaid.” But living in Pennsylvania made it a little difficult to get in the ocean and see if she grew a tail. Now a 23-year-old graduate student and education specialist for San Diego Coastkeeper, she has found a way to make her childhood dream a reality not only for herself but for other people as well. Subers hosts an Airbnb Experience giving out full mermaid-makeovers (tails included) and photoshoots at La Jolla Shores Park guaranteed to make you feel like you're in Disney movie. While it's an idea she’s always had swimming around in her head, it wasn’t until she graduated college and learned about Airbnb’s new Experiences program before the ball really started rolling.  “I almost didn’t apply because I thought they were going to think I was crazy,” she said, looking back. But she made the leap and was one of the 30 people selected out of the 2,000 that applied. More San Diego experiences have been added since, but Subers’ “Play mermaid for the day” was a part of the first cohort. When she was first selected, she had one tail, one top, and no camera. She set out on expanded her tools and inventory with the “no money she had from college,” and started shooting. It was a slow build at first but now she’s almost always immediately booked for any days she marks available through the app. After a date is decided, Subers meets her participants at La Jolla Shores Park – or somewhere else if it’s overly crowded – and takes them to her spot on the beach where all the mermaid accessories you could ever want are laid out to choose from. Once the makeover is complete, she’ll walk you down to the water’s edge and help you get into your tail, which is where you’ll stay during the majority of the photo shoot because “you can’t walk, and your range of motion is pretty limited.” And with the photo shoot taking place at sunset, Subers says the lighting is always good.  While some people are more “into it” then others, once she starts shooting, she says everyone tends to forget any insecurities they may have previously had and starts enjoying themselves. “I really try to make people feel as comfortable as possible, because essentially, it’s a glorified bikini shoot,” Subers joked. “One of the most gratifying parts has been seeing people forget about their insecurities for a bit."  Watching people have fun with it is especially gratifying for Subers because she’s been there.  “I used to never feel comfortable in a bikini in public until I started doing this,” she said. “Because I realized that when you’re a mermaid, kids don’t care. They don’t care if you have a tummy or what size you are or anything like that. You’re a mermaid, and they're obsessed because you’re a mermaid. That’s really empowering.”  Subers’ photoshoots typically last about 90 minutes for 1-3 people (though she can sometimes accommodate larger groups) and cost $85 per person, with the ability to upgrade to a professional-grade tale for $105 per person. The experience includes mermaid attire to use for the shoot and 10-15 edited photos.  For more information about Subers’ mermaid experience, visit airbnb.com/experiences and search for Play mermaid for the day in San Diego.
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    (3)
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    Chris Brewster
    |
    April 17, 2019
    Permits are required to conduct business in city parks, including beaches. Were that not the case, the areas noted would be inundated with entrepreneurs of all ilk. Rather than promoting this business, which may well be unlawful, SD News should be looking into the requirements to conduct business in city parks and reporting it. If the business has requisite permits, SD News should be reporting that.
    Kris E
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    April 18, 2019
    You don't need a permit to have a small, non-commercial photo shoot on an SD beach. What she's doing is similar to an engagement photo shoot or taking family portraits. You were one quick google away from not having to leave a negative comment on a story about someone doing a creative and interesting thing.

    http://www.sdparks.org/content/sdparks/en/shop/PermitsandFees.html#Film

    https://www.sandiego.gov/sites/default/files/filming_production_guide.pdf

    Chris Brewster
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    April 19, 2019
    In reply to Kris E: The first link provided is to San Diego County Parks. This business is intended to take place in San Diego City Parks. I would agree with Kris E that you don't need a permit to have a small, non-commercial photo shoot on a San Diego beach. However, this business is clearly a commercial enterprise.

    Here's what the Municipal Code states: "It is unlawful for any person, firm or corporation to attempt to carry on or to carry on any commercial operation, to rent or sell merchandise of any kind, or to beach or moor any vessel for the purpose of displaying it for rental or sale, in any beach area, as defined in Section 63.20, including Mission Bay Park, unless licensed or otherwise specifically permitted to do so by the Director. This is specifically intended to include a commercial operation which involves delivering merchandise, a rental item, or a service to a beach area whether or not a financial transaction takes place within the beach area."
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