test
Sdnews rss feed
    Plenty of pink will walk through Pacific and Mission beaches during Susan G. Komen’s 3-Day event
    Nov 14, 2017 | 28237 views | 0 0 comments | 7 7 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    On Friday, Nov. 17, the San Diego 3-Day will begin with an inspirational opening ceremony at the Del Mar Fairgrounds. The route will continue south through La Jolla and Pacific Beach, finishing in Mission Bay Park where participants will camp. Above, participants walk by pink tents set up at Crown Point Park last year. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    On Friday, Nov. 17, the San Diego 3-Day will begin with an inspirational opening ceremony at the Del Mar Fairgrounds. The route will continue south through La Jolla and Pacific Beach, finishing in Mission Bay Park where participants will camp. Above, participants walk by pink tents set up at Crown Point Park last year. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    slideshow
    Pacific and Mission beaches will be well represented, as well as being part of the route, in the annual Susan G. Komen 3-Day walk to be held Friday, Nov. 17 through Sunday Nov. 19. The 3-Day is a 60-mile walk for women and men who are ready to end breast cancer forever. Participants raise a minimum of $2,300 and walk an average of 20 miles a day for three consecutive days, educating tens of thousands of people about breast health and raising funds to help support breast cancer research and community outreach programs.  During the past 14 years and 156 events, the Komen 3-Day has raised more than $820 million, which Komen has used to save lives and make huge strides in breast cancer research. In 2016, Susan G. Komen set a Bold Goal to reduce the current number of breast cancer deaths by 50 percent in the U.S. by 2026. The Walk/Run Route Schedule: Friday, Nov. 17:  The San Diego 3-Day will begin with an inspirational opening ceremony at the Del Mar Fairgrounds. After lunch on the beach, the route will continue south through La Jolla and Pacific Beach, finishing in Mission Bay Park where participants will camp. Saturday, Nov. 18:  On Saturday morning, participants will walk by SeaWorld before heading toward the ocean. The route will showcase Ocean Beach, Point Loma and the beautiful homes along the ocean in Sunset Cliffs. The second half of the route will travel along the ocean boardwalk in Mission Beach and Pacific Beach before heading east. Sunday, Nov. 19:  The final day begins with a tour through Pacific Beach heading to the pedestrian path on the east side of Mission Bay Park. After lunch in Mission Hills, the route will tour Hillcrest, Balboa Park, and Downtown. The route will end in East Village with a celebratory closing ceremony at Petco Park. Seventy-five percent of the net proceeds raised from the 3-Day help Susan G. Komen support the global research program and other mission objectives, while the remaining 25 percent helps affiliates support local programs including medical assistance, patient navigation and provider education — all of which support Komen’s Bold Goal. Susan G. Komen fought breast cancer unsuccessfully with her heart, body and soul. Throughout her diagnosis, treatments, and long hospitalization, Komen spent her time thinking of ways to make life better for other women battling breast cancer. Moved by Susan’s compassion for others and commitment to making a difference, her sister, Nancy G. Brinker, promised Komen that she would do everything in her power to end breast cancer and help women who were suffering. The legacy lives on through the work of Susan G. Komen, the nonprofit Texas-based organization and public charity Nancy started. Susan G. Komen is the global leader of the breast cancer movement, having invested more than $1 billion in breast cancer research since its inception in 1982.  For more information, visit The3Day.org or call 800-996-3DAY. Connect on Facebook at Facebook.com/The3Day, Twitter @The3Day and Instagram @Komen3Day. 
    Comments
    (0)
    Comments-icon Post a Comment
    No Comments Yet
    Top 10 Instagram-worthy places in Pacific and Mission beaches
    by Mathilde Rousseau Bjerregaard
    Nov 14, 2017 | 2012 views | 0 0 comments | 11 11 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Pacific Beach-based model Paige Fulfer poses for a photo in front of the mermaid mural on Mission Boulevard. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Pacific Beach-based model Paige Fulfer poses for a photo in front of the mermaid mural on Mission Boulevard. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    slideshow
    Paige Fulfer takes a selfie at the former bait shack on the South Mission Beach jetty. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Paige Fulfer takes a selfie at the former bait shack on the South Mission Beach jetty. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    slideshow
    Lifeguard towers in Mission Beach. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Lifeguard towers in Mission Beach. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    slideshow
    The shark mural near the Beach Bungalow Hostel in Pacific Beach. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    The shark mural near the Beach Bungalow Hostel in Pacific Beach. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    slideshow
    Under the Crystal Pier at sunset. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Under the Crystal Pier at sunset. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    slideshow
    The Giant Dipper roller coaster at Belmont Park. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    The Giant Dipper roller coaster at Belmont Park. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    slideshow
    Veronica Parker poses with the angel wings in Pacific Beach.
    Veronica Parker poses with the angel wings in Pacific Beach.
    slideshow
    Scenic view of Pacific and Mission beaches from La Jolla Mesa Drive. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Scenic view of Pacific and Mission beaches from La Jolla Mesa Drive. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    slideshow
    Surfers at Tourmaline Beach. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Surfers at Tourmaline Beach. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    slideshow
    Pacific Beach and Mission Beach are filled with colorful murals, scenic streets, pretty parks and a historic pier that all make perfect photo locations for a top-notch Instagram gallery. Here are the top 10 most Instagram-worthy places that you can’t miss while you are visiting Pacific Beach and Mission Beach. Mermaid mural One of the most popular places in Pacific Beach for Instagram photos is the bright mermaid mural on Mission Boulevard just north of Dirty Birds. The beautiful mural was painted by Jared Blake Lazer (aka Jared Black Lazer), who is a Southern California-based visual artist, muralist and graphic designer. Lazer painted the mural in 2015 for the shop Daffodil Dresses, which was located there at that time. You can’t say that you have been in Pacific Beach without posting a photo of yourself in front of the mural. Bait shack The former bait shack about halfway out on the South Mission Beach jetty is like a doorway to the Pacific Ocean. The exterior has been painted over various times with colorful graffiti, which makes it an interesting backdrop for a cool photo. But be careful walking out on the slick jetty rocks; the shack is not as close as it seems. Lifeguard towers Another popular prop for a good photo are the lifeguard towers along Pacific Mission beaches. The white and yellow towers, combined with the blue sky and the light sand, make a perfect California beach photo. There are more than 20 towers all the way from South Mission Beach to Pacific Beach, so there is no excuse for not posting a photo. Beach Bungalow Hostel At the end of Reed Avenue, just by the beach, is the yellow, blue, orange, green and turquoise Beach Bungalow Hostel. The hostel is filled with murals, patterns and more colors. Next to the hostel, on the boardwalk, is an ice cream shop that has a mural of a big shark on its north side, which is another popular Instagram spot. The hostel has a very authentic and memorable vibe that gives you the perfect California feels. Beach sunsets There are plenty of places deemed Instagram-worthy to watch the sunset in San Diego, and Mission Beach and Pacific Beach are no exception. Just pick a spot along the Ocean Front Walk to get a stunning view of the latest Southern California miracle. Crystal Pier Another popular location for photos is underneath the 90-year-old Crystal Pier in Pacific Beach (on the pier works as well). The wooden pillars, together with the foaming waves and the bright sand, makes it a fun location for a group photo. Belmont Park The old wooden roller coaster at Belmont Park with the white, red and turquoise colors, the palm trees in the background, with the beach right next to it, screams for an Instagram shot. The historic amusement ride in Mission Beach, named the Giant Dipper, was built in 1925. Wings at Cass Street Pacific Beach has been described as heavenly and it does have a pair of white angel wings to show for it. The mural, originally painted for a photo shoot, is located on a wall on the west side of Cass Street near the PB library. Having a photo taken “wearing” the angel wings is a rite of passage for visitors and residents. La Jolla Mesa Drive Head north on Mission Boulevard and then take La Jolla Mesa Drive toward Mt. Soledad. The road gets steep, but on the way up make sure to look in your rearview mirror as the Pacific Beach coastline starts to come into view. Pull over and take a selfie – on a clear day you can see all the way to the Ocean Beach Pier. Tourmaline Street What is more Instagram-worthy than a street filled with palm trees on both sides and the ocean in the background? The street severely slopes down to the beach, so stand at the top for a selfie and feed your Instagram account some “California Love.” As an added bonus, find a spot in the parking lot at the bottom of the street, check out the mural on the side of the bathhouse, and then watch the surfers in action.
    Comments
    (0)
    Comments-icon Post a Comment
    No Comments Yet
    Man turns stolen bamboo bicycle into Bikes for Kids campaign
    by Mathilde Rousseau Bjerregaard
    Nov 13, 2017 | 3451 views | 0 0 comments | 7 7 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Rob Greenfield on his bamboo bike.
    Rob Greenfield on his bamboo bike.
    slideshow
    Rob Greenfield with Guitar Johnny, who stole the bamboo bike.
    Rob Greenfield with Guitar Johnny, who stole the bamboo bike.
    slideshow
    On Friday, Nov. 3, former San Diego resident Rob Greenfield had his beloved bamboo bike, which he had ridden across the country, stolen in front of the Catamaran Hotel in Mission Bay. But instead of letting the loss of his bike ruin his day, he decided to turn the situation into something positive. Greenfield wanted to turn his own misfortune into someone else’s fortune, so he started the GoFundMe.com campaign “Bikes for Kids” to raise money for kids who have had their bikes stolen. “I am in a situation where I can go and buy a new bike, but there are a lot of kids out there who live in low-income scenarios and if they get their bike stolen they can't get another one,” said Greenfield. Greenfield shared a video on Facebook of himself, asking people to help him turn the bad deed of his bike being stolen, into dozens of good deeds. He started raising money to buy bikes for kids. “I am a strong believer in the idea that hate cannot drive out hate and darkness cannot drive out darkness. Bad deeds cannot drive out bad deeds. Only good deeds can do that,” said Greenfield. Through “Bikes for Kids,” Greenfield already raised enough money to buy bikes for 10 kids. He also managed to find his bike’s thief, and get his bamboo bike back. Greenfield’s bike was stolen by a man named Guitar Johnny, who stole it to get his next fix. Greenfield decided not to report him to the police, but instead they made a deal that Guitar Johnny is going to do something good for humanity, and the former bike thief committed to helping to fix bikes for people in need to make up for his bad deed. “I don’t think that him going to jail is going to solve the problem. There are more people in jail in the United States than any other country in the world, and I think that we have seen that putting people in jail and punishing them that way doesn’t work. I think we need compassion,” said Greenfield. You can still donate to “Bikes for Kids” and all extra funds will be used to do good deeds for the rest of 2017 and to buy bikes for people who've had their bike stolen. For more information,, visit www.gofundme.com/bamboobike.
    Comments
    (0)
    Comments-icon Post a Comment
    No Comments Yet
    Groundswell Community Project empowers women in waves
    by Mathilde Rousseau Bjerregaard
    Nov 10, 2017 | 26508 views | 0 0 comments | 8 8 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Groundswell Community Project founder Natalie Small leads a group of women through surf therapy at Dog Beach in Ocean Beach. / PHOTO CONTRIBUTED
    Groundswell Community Project founder Natalie Small leads a group of women through surf therapy at Dog Beach in Ocean Beach. / PHOTO CONTRIBUTED
    slideshow
    Natalie Small (second from right) with a group from Groundswell Community Project.
    Natalie Small (second from right) with a group from Groundswell Community Project.
    slideshow
    Groundswell Community Project is a San Diego-based nonprofit organization that builds safe and brave spaces for women to heal, empower, and unite through the art of surfing. Our mission at Groundswell Community Project is to let the ocean be a space for women who are overcoming personal problems to heal and to give them the opportunity to explore their own strengths,” said Natalie Small, the founder and facilitator of Groundswell Community Project. The organization provides four- and eight-week programs for individuals and groups to engage and expand themselves through surf therapy. The programs create safe spaces for self expression, exploration, and healing for self and the community. “I wanted to give women an opportunity to get together and be able to be children again playing and exploring their strengths. As adult women, we don’t really get to play and playing is really important,” said Small. Small is a state-licensed marriage and family therapist and she works at a private practice for individuals, families, and couples using experiential therapies to help empower them to overcome mental disabilities like anxiety and depression. She is also a first aid arts facilitator, trained in how art can be a tool to overcome trauma and its triggers. Six years ago, Small combined her passions and therapist skills into the Groundswell Community Project. She wanted to take her training and experience in therapy to the ocean and let the ocean be the venue for healing. “I just see an instant transformation that occurs when the women get into the ocean and reconnect with their bodies in a positive way. It breaks down the barrier and the judgment that we hold against ourselves and each other, and just lets us be free to connect with our soul,” said Small. The Groundswell Community Project helps women who have been victims of sex trafficking, and who are overcoming addictions, abuse and depression. The project’s mission is to be a creative community that allows women to embrace healing and empowerment, through bold and beautiful engagement with each other, the outdoors and the arts. To join the team, and become a surf sister, visit groundswellcommunity.org.
    Comments
    (0)
    Comments-icon Post a Comment
    No Comments Yet
    Día de los Muertos brings Mexico City back to life
    by THOMAS MELVILLE
    Nov 06, 2017 | 26233 views | 1 1 comments | 10 10 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    slideshow
    Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City paid tribute to the earthquake victims and first responders with a giant fist sculpture made out of multi-colored hard hats, pickaxes and rubble on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City paid tribute to the earthquake victims and first responders with a giant fist sculpture made out of multi-colored hard hats, pickaxes and rubble on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    slideshow
    Thousands watched the Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Thousands watched the Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    slideshow
    The Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    The Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    slideshow
    The Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    The Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    slideshow
    The Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    The Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    slideshow
    The Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    The Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    slideshow
    The Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    The Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    slideshow
    The Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    The Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    slideshow
    The Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    The Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    slideshow
    The Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    The Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    slideshow
    The Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    The Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    slideshow
    The Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    The Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    slideshow
    The faces at the Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    The faces at the Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    slideshow
    The faces at the Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    The faces at the Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    slideshow
    The faces at the Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    The faces at the Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    slideshow
    The faces at the Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    The faces at the Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    slideshow
    The faces at the Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    The faces at the Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    slideshow
    The faces at the Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    The faces at the Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    slideshow
    The faces at the Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    The faces at the Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    slideshow
    The faces at the Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    The faces at the Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    slideshow
    The popular trajinera boats in Xochimilco. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    The popular trajinera boats in Xochimilco. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    slideshow
    A colorful Catrina in the Zócalo. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    A colorful Catrina in the Zócalo. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    slideshow
    Colorfully painted skulls lined Paseo de la Reforma during October to help promote the Día de los Muertos parade. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Colorfully painted skulls lined Paseo de la Reforma during October to help promote the Día de los Muertos parade. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    slideshow
    Rubble left over from the earthquake still lines the sidewalks in Xochimilco, a gritty neighborhood in southern Mexico City. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Rubble left over from the earthquake still lines the sidewalks in Xochimilco, a gritty neighborhood in southern Mexico City. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    slideshow
    Mercado Roma, with its orange and black tiled floor and bright angular countertops, was open and doing brisk business serving a variety of local favorites. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Mercado Roma, with its orange and black tiled floor and bright angular countertops, was open and doing brisk business serving a variety of local favorites. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    slideshow
    The Zócalo, which is bordered by the Cathedral to the north, the National Palace to the east, the Federal District buildings to the south and the Old Portal de Mercaderes to the west, the Nacional Monte de Piedad building at the north-west corner, with the Templo Mayor site to the northeast, the morning of the parade. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    The Zócalo, which is bordered by the Cathedral to the north, the National Palace to the east, the Federal District buildings to the south and the Old Portal de Mercaderes to the west, the Nacional Monte de Piedad building at the north-west corner, with the Templo Mayor site to the northeast, the morning of the parade. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    slideshow
    (San Diego Community Newspaper Group managing editor Thomas Melville traveled to Mexico City to see how the area was recovering from the devastating earthquakes and to experience the huge Día de los Muertos celebration and parade.) As a show of strength, unity and resiliency, thousands of onlookers raised their hands, mirroring the first responders who were walking behind the first Día de los Muertos parade float to arrive at the overpacked Zócalo – a giant fist made out of multi-colored hard hats, pickaxes and rubble. As the sculpture stopped in front of the Cathedral, the first responders formed their hands into fist, and the voices of Mexico roared. The second annual Day of the Dead celebration came at the right time for this bustling, yet damaged city. On Sept. 7, an 8.2 magnitude earthquake shook the region, razed buildings, and killed more than 200 people in the city. Since then, recovery has been slow and the citizenry a little timid. The parade on Saturday, Oct. 28, which brought out more than 300,000 people along a lengthy route that began on Paseo de la Reforma and snaked through Centro Histórico, paid tribute to the earthquake victims, helpers and heroes – and could be a major step to help heal the city. “It was kind of weird to do this happy celebration after this tragedy,” said Paola Schlaepfer, executive producer at Callejón Salao, which produced part of the parade. “We had been preparing for six months, then stopped after the earthquake, and thought about what we could do to pay homage to the dead, and all the people who were helping and working to rescue people. “We wanted to acknowledge them at the beginning of the parade,” she said. “And then the parade will continue – and so will the city.” Roma Norte Some areas of the city, such as Centro Histórico, are back to normal, with sidewalks filled with people motivated to sell goods, services and snacks to passersby. The Metro is still jammed with commuters who have no problem elbowing their way into and out of subway cars. But in the Roma Norte district, which was hit particularly hard during the earthquake, severely damaged buildings are roped off, and backhoes are still clearing piles of rubble that line sidewalks. “There are areas of the city that used to be very crowded and full of life that are not anymore,” Schlaepfer said. “But they are starting to recover very slowly. People are still a little afraid to go to the areas that were hit hard, like Roma Norte. The businesses and restaurants there are restarting but it is a slow process.” Mercado Roma, with its orange and black tiled floor and bright angular countertops, was open and doing brisk business serving a variety of local favorites, along with Asian barbecue and Mediterranean seafood options. But a few blocks west, in the grassy square of an intersection, a church group was giving out clothes to needy people from a makeshift tent. Overlooking them was the mural of Frida, the rescue dog, that Ocean Beach artist Celeste Byers painted a few weeks ago as a symbol of hope. Xochimilco In Xochimilco, a gritty neighborhood in southern Mexico City, which relies on the tourist trade of its popular trajinera boats that float lovers and partiers down its famous canals, things have been quiet since Sept. 7. After a video went viral of the boats being sloshed around the canals by waves generated from the earthquake, accompanied by screams of some tourists, business slowed considerably. One of the long-time tourist guides said people are not visiting the canals like they used to because they are afraid. He gestured with his arms, shrugged his shoulders and rubbed his cropped white beard while shaking his head back and forth. On that weekday afternoon in late October, the place had only a few visitors. Workers were repairing the roofs of the shops that line the canal, boat owners were repainting the colorful signs and names of their trajineras, which mostly sat idle in the water. “The people are waiting to see what will happen,” Schlaepfer said. “But we need to reactivate those areas that were affected. We have to move on.” Parade It’s odd that James Bond has a role here. But the 2015 film “Spectre” started with an intense chase scene set in the Zócalo during a huge Día de los Muertos parade. That parade was just a fabrication for the movie. The long-time celebration usually included just a small parade of Catrinas. But the movie version was what the tourists wanted to see and the city leaders decided to capitalize on that opportunity. In 2016, they staged the inaugural Día de los Muertos parade, which some Mexicans criticized as too crass and commercial, but more than 200,000 cheered it on, and so a sequel was planned. “The parade last year was a great success. It has became a new tradition for the city,” Schlaepfer said. This year’s version was extraordinary, with 50 foot tall skeletons and giant skulls bobbing along the route, interlaced by hundreds of dancing Catrinas and howling Aztecs. The Zócalo was overflowing with people cheering on the parade, checking out the huge Día de los Muertos alters, and taking selfies with the hundreds of Catrinas with their uniquely colorful painted faces – their take on the traditional “dapper skeleton.” “The people of this city deserve some happiness,” Schlaepfer said. “We want to bring back smiles on the faces of the people.” Even if on this day of the dead, those smiles were painted on.
    Comments
    (1)
    Comments-icon Post a Comment
    beach&baypress
    |
    November 09, 2017
    Wow. Great article and photos!
    News
    Jim Krause Memorial Charity Bicycle Ride in Point Loma on Nov. 11
    The Point Loma Rotary Club invites San Diegans to “ride the hidden, unridden, and forbidden Point Loma” in the fifth annual Jim Krause Memorial Charity Bicycle Ride on Nov. 11 to support pancreatic...
    Published - Thursday, November 09
    full story
    Peninsula planners propose land parcel consolidation
    A proposal to eliminate consolidating substandard, contiguous land parcels headlined discussion by Peninsula Community Planning Board at its October meeting. PCPB board approved writing a letter su...
    Published - Thursday, November 09
    full story
    PLHS fall sports produce champions
    Fall sports teams at Point Loma High produced championships and individual honors in several sports. Girls tennis The girls tennis team finished 12-0 to take the Eastern League title. Individually,...
    Published - Thursday, November 09
    full story
    Person shot in Mission Beach, police searching for suspect
    The victim was walking near 3100 Mission Boulevard when the suspect walked up behind the victim about 10:30 p.m. on Nov. 7. The suspect passed the victim turned around and shot the victim. The vict...
    Published - Wednesday, November 08
    full story
    James Gang moves back to where it all started on Newport
    One of Ocean Beach's bedrock businesses, James Gang Co. print shop and silk screening, is in mid-move from 1931 Bacon St. at Santa Monica to 4851 Newport Ave. on the beach town's main drag. “What w...
    Published - Wednesday, November 08
    full story
    Blue Water Seafood to open new restaurant in Ocean Beach
    Blue Water Seafood Market & Grill, known by locals for its fresh seafood and genuine experience, recently announced plans to open a second location in Ocean Beach. Brothers and Ocean Beach natives,...
    Published - Wednesday, November 08
    full story
    San Diego pro lacrosse team named Seals, to play at Valley View Casino Center in 2018
    In late-August, the National Lacrosse League awarded an expansion team to the city of San Diego. In October, the team announced its much-awaited identity at a press conference on the rooftop of La ...
    Published - Tuesday, November 07
    full story
    Local woman dances her way across Portugal’s islands
    Before I get into my adventures around Portugal and the beautiful islands, I feel it is crucial to specify exactly how the Portuguese American Dancers got me there. This vibrant dance group has bee...
    Published - Tuesday, November 07
    full story
    Beauty or torture? New exhibit examines society’s demand for perfection
    The Women’s Museum of California in Liberty Station has opened their latest exhibit, “Beauty or Torture,” which explores how women across the ages have gone to extreme measures to alter their looks...
    Published - Tuesday, November 07
    full story
    San Diego Ballet's season opener is world premiere of ‘Homegrown’
    San Diego Ballet's world premiere and season opener “Homegrown,” is proudly and successfully, delighting audiences. Performances will continue on Saturday, Nov. 11 and Sunday, Nov. 12 at the White ...
    Published - Tuesday, November 07
    full story
    New SubMe app helps get players in the game
    ”SubMe is like a sports version of Tinder, because all the app users have to do is to swipe right to participate in sports related games or fitness activities,” said Eric M. Geller, who is the co-f...
    Published - Tuesday, November 07
    full story
    Local hepatitis A public health emergency extended again
    The local public health emergency for the ongoing hepatitis A outbreak was extended again for another two weeks Monday by the San Diego County Board of Supervisors. The Board is required to review ...
    Published - Monday, November 06
    full story
    Point Loma residents to participate in ‘Tellebration’
    A unique entertainment event will be observed in Ocean Beach next month. Members of the Storytellers of San Diego will present the 27th annual "Tellebration" Saturday, Nov. 11 at the Bethany Luther...
    Published - Monday, November 06
    full story
    Mission Beach Women’s Club gathering supplies to send to servicewomen
    The Mission Beach Women’s Club S.O.S. Committee is at it again. In honor of Veterans Day, we are supporting our servicewomen and sending goodies overseas. The boxes will be stuffed at the Nov. 13 m...
    Published - Monday, November 06
    full story
    Current Issues(Archives)
    La Jolla Village News, November 17th, 2017
    download La Jolla Village News, November 17th, 2017
    La Jolla Village News, November 17th, 2017
    Beach & Bay Press, November 16th, 2017
    download Beach & Bay Press, November 16th, 2017
    Beach & Bay Press, November 16th, 2017
    The Peninsula Beacon, November 9th, 2017
    download The Peninsula Beacon, November 9th, 2017
    The Peninsula Beacon, November 9th, 2017
    La Jolla Village News, November 3rd, 2017
    download La Jolla Village News, November 3rd, 2017
    La Jolla Village News, November 3rd, 2017