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    Mission Bay High graduates more than 200 students
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Jun 14, 2018 | 8007 views | 1 1 comments | 7 7 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Mission Bay High School’s Class of 2018 celebrates graduating on June 13. / Photo by Dave Schwab
    Mission Bay High School’s Class of 2018 celebrates graduating on June 13. / Photo by Dave Schwab
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    Mission Bay High School’s Class of 2018 students at commencement. / Photo by Dave Schwab
    Mission Bay High School’s Class of 2018 students at commencement. / Photo by Dave Schwab
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    Mission Bay High School’s Class of 2018 students at commencement. / Photo by Dave Schwab
    Mission Bay High School’s Class of 2018 students at commencement. / Photo by Dave Schwab
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    Mission Bay High School’s Class of 2018 paraded into the school’s football stadium on June 13, cheered on by family, and friends on a sunny afternoon outdoors. Students Madeline Lynch, Josie La Valle and Piatt Pund sung the national anthem to kick off the commencement ceremony. Clad in caps and gowns with gold tassels, graduates were handed their diplomas personally by principal Ernest Remillard, who posed for a photograph with each student as their names were called out from the class list. “We are gathered here today to recognize all 214 of these students for managing to survive and overcome the obstacles faced,” said ASB Council president Cecilia Lopez. “We all know how hard it is to balance both our personal and academic struggles, while juggling work and sports with classes, sometimes sleeping only six hours a night – or pulling an all-nighter to study for a final – and waking up at 5 a.m. to catch a bus. But it was all worth it… an unforgettable journey.”  MBHS senior class president Bryanna Pintor said, “This is not an ending – but a new beginning.” She thanked her mom, whom she described as her “best friend” noting, “She never allowed me to believe in obstacles, that I couldn’t do whatever I wanted to do, or be whoever I wanted to be.” Of her friends, Pintor said, “Thank you all for shaping me and being there for me. Getting here was by no means easy. There were many times we thought we would never reach the finish line. “But those struggles have only made this moment sweeter. We have the power to change the world. I am confident our generation will make change, not only in the way we think, but in our actions. It is our turn, and the good news is that all of us are ready,” said Pintor. Pointing out she “never liked being the center of attention,” valedictorian Ciara Gray said she was “wiser today than four years ago.” Pointing to balance as her prevailing theme, Gray thanked her instructors for “teaching me to enjoy the journey,” adding, “I am grateful to all the students, teachers and staff who shaped my high-school experience.” In his speech, salutatorian Luke Loomis thanked his peers, MBHS faculty and student parents.  Of parents, Loomis commented, “You are the bows from which your living arrows are sent forward.” He thanked “all the parents and parental figures here today for their unconditional love, which has helped drive us to this moment.” Remillard congratulated the graduates for “pushing themselves” to meet graduation requirements noting, “Most of you exceeded those requirements. “You have brought so much to this class,” Remillard added. “This will be the first day of your new journey. I am confident Mission Bay High School has prepared you for this next step … to achieve greatness in whatever journey your life takes you on. “Enjoy the journey,” was the principal’s final piece of advice. “Please remember, Always be respectful. Go Bucs!”
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    Dea12
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    June 14, 2018
    Boy's got the fresh T I M B S
    Mission Beach entrepreneurs driven to create eco-friendly sunblock
    by LUCIA VITI
    Jun 14, 2018 | 2027 views | 1 1 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Nicolette Remmel and Maxine Chapman on their van. / Photo by Jonathan Schumann
    Nicolette Remmel and Maxine Chapman on their van. / Photo by Jonathan Schumann
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    Nicolette Remmel and Maxine Chapman in their van. / Photo by Jonathan Schumann
    Nicolette Remmel and Maxine Chapman in their van. / Photo by Jonathan Schumann
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    SurfDurt is a non-toxic, water-resistant, physical barrier sunblock.
    SurfDurt is a non-toxic, water-resistant, physical barrier sunblock.
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    Revolutions are sparked by an underbelly of discontent. Something is wrong. And someone – or two – will serve as a catalyst for change. Revolutionary change. Mission Beach residents Maxine Chapman and Nicolette Remmel are revolutionaries who refuse to simply dream about a future that respects the coral reefs. They’re doing something about, slather upon slather of sunscreen. The entrepreneurs have rolled out SurfDurt, a non-toxic, water-resistant, physical barrier sunblock. Not only is the organic “durt” a healthier and more effective sunscreen, SurfDurt is also reef-safe. This eco-friendly suntan protection will save the world’s dwindling coral reefs. “SurfDurt is sun protection that’s better for our oceans and better for your skin,” said Chapman. “Chemical sunscreens, however proficient in combating harmful UV rays, are toxic to your body and the ocean waters. Physical barrier sunscreens are just what they’re called – a physical barrier that reflects UV rays. Because physical barriers are not absorbed into the skin, they’re non-toxic to the body and they don’t pollute the waters.” SurfDurt contains a non-nano zinc oxide, a mineral powder that reflects sunrays without seeping into the skin. This active ingredient is reef safe with a zero percent toxicity level. Chemical sunscreens contain nanoparticles that are immediately absorbed into the skin’s dermal layer causing “oxidative stress that endangers skin cells and the coral reefs.” SurfDurt is also paraben-free. Parabens – preservatives – give cosmetics, lotions and creams a “creamy mayonnaise” texture. But not only are parabens linked to “estrogen disruption,” they lack “conclusive scientific evidence” for “metabolizing out of the body,” causing concern for its unknown cumulative effects. Chapman’s father, a Hawaiian “waterman,” who doubles as a scientist and a chemist, recognized the toxicity of sunscreen to the ocean’s eco systems early on. Teaching Maxine “his Ph.D. in layman’s turn since I was a little girl,” SurfDurt began as a kitchen project as a way “not to be a part of the problem,” and carted to the beach in plastic containers. Many versions of the “Tupperware stuff” were shared with fellow surfers, including long-time high school friend “Nicki” Remmel. The home-made sunblock remedy was a huge hit. Remmel served as the catalyst for bringing the product to market. Although not the first physical barrier sold in this niche market, other products fell short. “Everything else smelled funny, turned hot in the water, or looked like white war paint,” said Remmel. “We changed the user experience so it smelled nice – naturally, like cookies; didn’t sting the eyes or cause skin breakouts; and it’s good for every outdoor sport, especially surfing. We are the product’s consumers.” “We fiddled with the pigment, the texture, consistency, the smell, its water-resiliency, and endurance,” added Chapman. “We especially didn’t want lifeguard, all-white, clown-nose war paint. The Tupperware carried many revisions before Nicki and I trademarked our recipe.” What was once mixed in stovetop pots is now manufactured in small batches, through solar-powered, “dad-inspired machines” on family-operated assembly lines. The clan affair has everyone donning lab coats, gloves, hair nets in a space forfeited by “mom.” Manufacturing is described as extensive. “Everything is a process,” continued Chapman. “There’s a process to ensure the lotion’s smoothness and consistency and a process to ensure the proper distribution of minerals. Without chemical add-ins, it’s a long process that includes a heating element, a grinding element, an emulsifying element and a distribution element.” Because sunscreens advertise to prevent cancer, they’re categorized as an over-the-counter drug that requires Federal Drug Administration approval. Tested as a medical treatment – as opposed to a cosmetic, – the FDA requires laboratory proof for every advertised claim. Although costly, the girls “hung in” for almost two years. “Because SurfDurt is a physical barrier sunscreen that blocks cancer cell accelerators it’s considered a drug,” continued Chapman. “We spent an enormous amount of time complying with all of the FDA rules and requirements. And that’s o.k. We’re thrilled to be among people who care. We mix a formula, but you’re the real solution. We’ll make it but we can’t save the eco system unless you buy it.” Essential to our ecosystem, coral reefs provide the world its oxygen. “Life on land cannot continue without the preservation of this gravely endangered underwater ecosystem,” said Chapman. The 2017 World Economic Forum estimates between 6,000 to 14, 000 tons of man-made toxic pollution is destroying coral reefs world-wide. Chapman and Remmel both agree, “the numbers are scary.” The devastation of coral reefs tally at a 99 percent decline in the Florida Keys; 85 percent in the Caribbean; and 40 percent decline in Hawaii and the Great Barrier Reef Convinced that the systems will die, “it’s just a matter of when,” Marine biologists have conducted isolated experiments to understand the cause of the destruction. Because coral reefs naturally repair, pinpointing the chemical culprits would afford a resolution. Research results have directly attributed chemical pollution to toxic sunscreens. The problem, say the duo, is “prolific.” One drop of a common sunscreen chemical, Oxybenzone, damages coral reefs estimating a quarter-mile in length. Adding insult to injury, ninety-percent of sunscreens sold contain a laundry list of equally toxic chemical pollutants. “Minimizing chemical pollution gives the ecosystems a chance to replenish themselves,” said Chapman. “It’s amazing. We can clean our oceans by making one small, exponential and important change – sun protection that’s truly reef-safe.” Named to “encompass the natural, raw not quite mud texture and consistency,” SurfDurt will solidify in the cold – although will soften easily – and will soften in direct sunlight. Cool storage is suggested. SurfDurt spreads easily and Chapman and Remmel agree, “apply generously.” The duo have taken “care for ecological packaging” and encourage reuse of SurfDurt through their recycling program.  Remmel, who touts a bachelor of arts in international studies and Chapman, who touts a bachelor of art in humanities and art, describe their eco-friendly concoction as a “good cool.” The revolutionaries share Remmel’s van that serves as home, office and mode of transport in order to “pump money into the company instead of rent.” When not on road trips cold calling, the van is parked in front of the best surfing spots between Pacific Beach and Ocean Beach. While the sunscreen team dream of growing world-wide, they won’t deviate from solar powered manufacturing. “No matter how big we get, anything but solar powered manufacturing is a step in the wrong direction,” said Remmel. “SurfDurt is an environmentally conscious product. We’re not about to step backwards by the way it’s made.” Reception for SurfDurt has been “kind and receptive.” “Lots of no’s for every yes,” said Remmel. “SurfDurt is an amazing blend of a natural sun protection that’s rich in skincare nutrients,” said Theresa Renfro, owner of Point Loma’s en concordia. “SurfDurt is a perfect nontoxic sun care lotion that prevents hyper-pigmentation and loss of elasticity. SurfDurt is a beautiful sensorial sunscreen that complements our line of clean beauty products.” The revolutionaries never imagined SurfDurt would become their careers but agree that it’s a dream come true. “We want to do what Patagonia did for rock climbing,” concluded Remmel. “Climbers used to drill and damage the rocks they so loved to climb. Patagonia changed that by creating climbing equipment to avoid drilling. SurfDurt is vested to do the same so surfers don’t leave a damaging trail in the water.” SurfDurt You can find SurfDurt at Salt Water Supply Store (OB), Ocean Beach Surf & Skate (OB), Aqua Adventures Kayaks & Paddleboards (Mission Bay), Play It Again Sports (PB), PB Surf Shop (PB), En Concordia (Point Loma), Bird's Surf Shed (OB).
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    Paul Rodriguez
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    1 Hour Ago
    I met with the beautiful creator of SurfDurt today, Maxine. I commented on the cool van she had and asked her what she was doing here in Pacifica CA. She was very nice and began to show me her product "SurfDurt" I tried it out, what a great sunsreen. Non oily, light feeling sunscreen that was also (best part) ECO-FRIENDLY! It also smelled alot better than traditional screens. I love the beaches here in Nor-Cal and appreciate a company and product trying to preserve it. Best of luck to the SurfDurt family, keeping our beaches and oceans toxic-free :)!
    Mission Bay valedictorian and salutatorian ready for next-level opportunities
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Jun 13, 2018 | 4911 views | 0 0 comments | 8 8 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Mission Bay High School Class of 2018 salutatorian Luke Loomis and valedictorian Ciara Gray.
    Mission Bay High School Class of 2018 salutatorian Luke Loomis and valedictorian Ciara Gray.
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    Mission Bay High School Class of 2018 salutatorian Luke Loomis and valedictorian Ciara Gray back when they were in sixth grade at PBMS and they both won International Baccalaureate Students of the year.
    Mission Bay High School Class of 2018 salutatorian Luke Loomis and valedictorian Ciara Gray back when they were in sixth grade at PBMS and they both won International Baccalaureate Students of the year.
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    Mission Bay High School Class of 2018 valedictorian Ciara Gray and salutatorian Luke Loomis shared their hopes – and fears – entering a broader world of sweeping change. The pair of graduates, who’ve known each other since karate class in third grade, said they had mixed feelings about leaving MBHS. “There’s a certain amount of anxiety about going off and living on your own,” said Loomis, who’s attending UC San Diego in the fall and majoring in human biology. “At the same time there’s an element of excitement because we’re going to be able to have our freedom and the ability to make our own lives.” “For most of the year, most of high school, I couldn’t wait for graduation and was looking forward to college,” said Gray, who will attend UC Santa Barbara as a math major. Gray, who’s grown up around marine science and had an internship with NOAA Southwest Fisheries, added, “There’s a lot of ways I could go” with a math-oriented career. “It’s something that’s very much a part of me, science, biology,” said Loomis. “If that leads me to med or law school, or to whatever post-bachelor degree schooling I decide I want to do – I’ll see what happens.” Though she characterized herself as “pessimistic,” Gray said she nonetheless is optimistic about her career future. “People have told me the job you’ll have in the future may not even exist yet,” she said. Asked what they saw as good and bad heading out into the world, Loomis answered, “Technology.”  Gray concurred, noting she loves being able to Google how-to questions, while avoiding “being sucked into technology. The convenience is nice, but it’s scary how much [technology] has infiltrated our lives.” What of their fears? Said Loomis, “One thing I’ve always been scared of is political dichotomy, one way or another, with or against … I very much like to have options in my political views.” “I’m also very politically ambiguous,” said Gray. “I have friends who are so politically one way or another that I can’t even debate with them because they believe so strongly. Everything is so extreme nowadays.” What of global warming? “We’ve passed the point of no return,” said Gray. “There are things we can do to reconcile what we’ve done, but we’re never going to get it back to as good as we’ve had it. “By 2050, there’s going to be more plastic than biomass in the ocean, and that is insane to me growing up surfing in the ocean,” she added. “It is very concerning being raised on the beaches,” agreed Loomis of climate change. “Our school has done a good job of educating us about having a global mindset when it comes to how we act, about water conservation, etc.” Concerning their graduation speeches, both Loomis and Gray were working on theirs.  Loomis planned to give a shout out to parents for the roles they play in shaping their children’s lives. Gray was still kicking around ideas, not wanting to deliver a “typically overdone speech” about leaving for college. What advice would they give to future Buccaneers? “Get involved in things, clubs, sports, early,” said Loomis. “Our school has so much to offer.” “Don’t [just] focus on the grades.” said Gray. “Teach yourself to find a way to get yourself interested in the material.”
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    ALL DECKED OUT – Ollies well in Pacific Beach for Go Skateboarding Day
    by GILLIAN WEINSTEIN
    Jun 13, 2018 | 705 views | 0 0 comments | 7 7 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Izzy Poulin shows the deck design of her Sector 9 skateboard before riding at Tourmaline in North Pacific Beach.  THOMAS MELVILLE / BEACH & BAY PRESS
    Izzy Poulin shows the deck design of her Sector 9 skateboard before riding at Tourmaline in North Pacific Beach. THOMAS MELVILLE / BEACH & BAY PRESS
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    Izzy Poulin and her boyfriend Trevor Borello ride down Tourmaline Street in North Pacific Beach.  THOMAS MELVILLE / BEACH & BAY PRESS
    Izzy Poulin and her boyfriend Trevor Borello ride down Tourmaline Street in North Pacific Beach. THOMAS MELVILLE / BEACH & BAY PRESS
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    Artist Autumn Love (@artbyautumn on Instagram) is framed by the Crystal Pier Hotel arch as she rides her longboard down the boardwalk in Pacific Beach while spreading her message of "love." / THOMAS MELVILLE / BEACH & BAY PRESS
    Artist Autumn Love (@artbyautumn on Instagram) is framed by the Crystal Pier Hotel arch as she rides her longboard down the boardwalk in Pacific Beach while spreading her message of "love." / THOMAS MELVILLE / BEACH & BAY PRESS
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    Adriana Olmos and Deanna Naegele show their love of skateboarding in PB. / ERICK NELSON / C.O.V.E PHOTOGRAPHY
    Adriana Olmos and Deanna Naegele show their love of skateboarding in PB. / ERICK NELSON / C.O.V.E PHOTOGRAPHY
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    Deanna Naegele rides through the streets of Pacific Beach.  /  ERICK NELSON / C.O.V.E PHOTOGRAPHY
    Deanna Naegele rides through the streets of Pacific Beach. / ERICK NELSON / C.O.V.E PHOTOGRAPHY
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    In Pacific Beach, skateboards are more than just a piece of maplewood with wheels. Skateboards are a method of transportation, a statement of identity, and are deeply ingrained in the vibrant beach culture. As the international “Go Skateboarding Day” approaches in San Diego (on June 21), area skate shops are organizing skate sessions, barbecues, and competitions that will gather the skating community together for fellowship, to raise awareness of the cause, and, of course, to have fun. So how did skateboarding become the wheels of a generation in SoCal? The Beach & Bay Press asked several local skate shop owners about skateboarding’s appeal. “Skateboarding became popular because of the strong surf culture, which ultimately led to skate culture because there is a lot of overlap between the two,” said Pablo Lanatta, owner of Adrenalina Skate in La Jolla. Paul (Pablo) Smith, owner of Soul Grind Skate Shop in Pacific Beach, spoke about his experience in the skating community, saying that the connection is strong because it is created through a passion for a thrill-seeking sport. He also brought up the originality factor within the community of skating. “There is a strong community of skaters,” he said, “but each person has a different style, does unique tricks, and follows a certain brand to express themselves.” According to reports, the skateboarding market is worth an estimated $4.8 billion in annual revenue with 11.08 million active skateboarders in the world. A common way to celebrate Go Skateboarding Day is to purchase new equipment, and locally-owned shops are a great place to start. Tyler Ashton, general manager at Sun Diego Boardshop in Mission Beach, says that most shops that sell skating equipment actually stock the same products, only the brands are different. He mentioned that it is important to know that some brands are owned by big corporations and don’t actually benefit the skating community. “Brands owned by skaters are a better option to buy from because you know that the owner of the company is in it for the passion of skating,” Tyler said. Some skater-owned companies that Tyler mentioned are Sk8mafia, Creature, and Santa Cruz. If you are looking to be active on June 21, Lanatta says that Adrenalina Skate is holding its annual skate event. Every year, the skate shop typically meets at a secret location that is announced shortly before the day, and skates in a group around the beach area. Lanatta also expressed his love for skating and how it benefits the environment by reducing the amount of motorized vehicles on the streets. He wants to share that message with the people outside of the skate community. “Not only is skating a good alternative mode of transportation to keep you fit, but it also gets people out of their cars, which keeps the air clean,” he said. Another event will take place at Robb Field Skate Park in Ocean Beach, City of San Diego’s first skatepark. Ocean Beach Surf and Skate organizes a ride every year from the store to the skate park, where they have a cookout to unite the community. Andrew Stoner, general manager of Ocean Beach Surf and Skate, explained that OB has a large number of skaters mainly because of the culture that the community emits. He described this culture as “a Bohemian vibe,” further clarifying that “Ocean Beach is a perfect beach area for people that enjoy the freedom of just riding around in the streets.” Ocean Beach Surf and Skate is known for being a family friendly skate shop that promotes and supports local skate companies. Revoked, a company that keeps its focus on the “lighter side of skating” while ensuring they give back to the community, sells their boards in OB Surf and Skate. Josh Utley, owner of Revoked, is a long time skateboarder who actually attended the opening of the Robb Field Skate Park when he was a freshman in high school. Revoked is currently doing a promotion with the San Diego native, ska/punk band, Buck-O-Nine. The company is selling 50 of each of the four unique deck designs that incorporate the band’s logo. For every Buck-O-Nine deck purchase, a deck will be given to a young skater in need at a local San Diego skatepark. “I lead the San Diego chapter of Skate For Change,” Utley said, “I give either homeless kids, or kids that come from low income families skateboards products. We have already given out a board at Washington Street.” Purchasing one of these skateboards will not only treat you to a brand new deck, but also give back to the community, support a local skate company, and get you in touch with your ska/punk roots. For more information, or to purchase a board, go to revokedmob.com. Skateboarding is a fantastic way to stay fit, travel somewhere not too far, learn more about yourself, and be apart of a unique and supportive community. It’s even going to be an Olympic sport. In 2016, it was announced that skateboarding will be represented at the 2020 Summer Olympics in Tokyo, Japan. So get outside and enjoy Go Skateboarding Day on June 21. Essential skate shops Soul Grind Skate Shop 4645 Cass St., soulgrind.com Soul Grind Skate Shop is a family owned business that is specifically geared toward skateboarding. The staff is knowledgeable about skateboarding and the different brands that are offered in the store, but also other brands being sold. This skate shop also has a huge selection of decks and all parts of the board, giving shoppers the option to build their own board or purchase one already completed. Ocean Beach Surf and Skate Shop 4940 Newport Ave., obsurfandskate.com Ocean Beach Surf and Skate Shop is a great place to go for skating lessons, camps, and clinics for ages 6-16. They offer a community for new skaters to learn beginner tricks. They also offer a lot of safety equipment for starters. Adrenalina Skate Shop 5745 La Jolla Blvd., adrenalinastore.com Adrenalina Skate Shop is family friendly, offering equipment for men, women, and children. They also have a price match guarantee where they will match lower prices found at competing stores. They also hold many events for the skating community to participate in. Every Sunday they have a “dock session,” where riders of all levels meet at the Broadway Pier and freestyle skate. In addition, every Tuesday during the summer they have an event called “Taco Tuesday Skate,” which is a skate session down the Pacific Beach boardwalk to Mission Beach and back, followed by food and drinks with friends. Sun Diego Boardshop 3126 Mission Blvd., sundiego.com Sun Diego Boardshop is a mini chain with eight different locations around San Diego County. This store offers a huge selection of brands and different style boards. You can purchase already-built boards or build your own from the parts at the store. The employees at Sun Diego are knowledgeable about skating and suggest great boards or pieces for each individual. Revoked revokedmob.com Sold at OB Surf and Skate, Clairemont Surf Shop, Slappy’s Garage in Linda Vista, Local Skate Shop in Lakeside. Revoked is an Ocean Beach-Point Loma company that makes and sells skateboards. The company manages the San Diego branch of Skate for Change, which donates skateboards to children in need. Skateboarding timeline 1958 — The skateboard is made from roller skates attached to a board in Southern California. As surfing becomes popular, "sidewalk surfing" becomes a way to surf when there are no waves. 1963 — Surfboard companies start making better-quality skateboards with clay wheels. The first skate contest is in Hermosa Beach. In 1964, Jan and Dean sing "Sidewalk Surfing" on “Dick Clark's American Bandstand.” Skateboarder magazine debuts. 1973 — With the invention of urethane wheels and fiberglass boards, new possibilities emerge as banks and curves become skateable, and skating is never the same. 1977 — The California drought forces homeowners to drain their pools, and skateboarders use the new spaces. New tricks are invented daily – aerials, inverts, and the ollie. 1982 — The Bones Brigade Video Show, which includes Stacey Peralta, Steve Caballero, and Tony Hawk, starts producing skateboarding videos that will reach kids all over the world. 1995 — Skateboarding takes a giant step into the mainstream with ESPN's Extreme Games, becoming more of a spectator sport. By the late ’90s, skating appears in mainstream commercials. 2000 — Robb Field Skatepark in Ocean Beach, constructed by the City of San Diego, opens February 2000. In 2004, International Association of Skateboard Cos. conceives Go Skateboarding Day. SOURCE: TEACHER.SCHOLASTIC.COM
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    Mission Bay students release sea bass into the bay
    Jun 11, 2018 | 7871 views | 1 1 comments | 9 9 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Mission Bay. Mission Bay High School Seniors Arielle Hancko and Margaret Campbell release juvenile white sea bass into Mission Bay.
    Mission Bay. Mission Bay High School Seniors Arielle Hancko and Margaret Campbell release juvenile white sea bass into Mission Bay.
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    Mission Bay High School marine science teacher Steve Walters and Mitch Masuda, Hubbs Senior Research Assistant, join MBHS marine science students and Eco Club members to release white sea bass into Mission Bay.
    Mission Bay High School marine science teacher Steve Walters and Mitch Masuda, Hubbs Senior Research Assistant, join MBHS marine science students and Eco Club members to release white sea bass into Mission Bay.
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    It was a good day to release white seabass into Mission Bay on June 8. A calm spring day on a medium tide with few predatory birds circling above, provided good conditions for the juvenile white sea bass to make their way through Mission Bay to the Pacific Ocean.  Mission Bay High School marine science students finished up their “Seabass in the Classroom” project with releasing 28 white seabass into Mission Bay with hopes of helping to restock the wild population.  Seabass in the Classroom is an aquaculture program offered by Hubbs-SeaWorld Research Institute (HSWRI) allowing students to raise seabass in their classrooms and then releasing them into the wild. HSWRI provides Seabass in the Classroom to more than 1,000 students at 11 schools throughout southern California encouraging students to study aquaculture in a practical setting while learning about the environment and increasing awareness about depleted fish populations.  This is the fifth year MBHS marine science students participated in the outreach program under the direction of marine science teacher Steve Walters. At the beginning of each semester, the school received seabass fry and the students raised them in their "fish room," a room containing tanks filled with sea life including sea bass, abalone, and turtles. The students studied aquaculture by feeding the fish and monitoring the temperature and salinity of the water, growing healthy fish ready to be released into the wild at the end of the semester. MBHS students have released more than 200 white seabass into Mission Bay since the program began at their school.  Before release, students implanted metal tags etched with numbers into the cheeks of the fish. When caught by fishermen, the seabass heads can be turned in to drop tanks set up by the Fish and Wildlife Department. Researchers can then check the tags to determine the size and journey of each fish.  "This is a great opportunity for a hands-on learning experience, to work with community partners, and expose more students to marine science and environmental conservation. We look forward to continuing this unique program in the coming years," Walters said.
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    randomcrazy1234567
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    June 13, 2018
    Hello. I hope this is amazing.
    News
    Volunteers clean 800 pounds of trash from San Diego beaches
    Nearly 500 volunteers with three organizations collected more than 800 pounds of trash and recyclables that accumulated over the Fourth of July holiday at Belmont Park in Mission Beach, and the Oce...
    Published - Thursday, July 06
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    Workshop set for Cañon Street park plans
    Plans to implement a new pocket park for Cañon Street in Point Loma approved by the City Council more than a year ago are forging ahead with a Wednesday, July 26 public workshop planned at United P...
    Published - Wednesday, July 05
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    Ocean Beach apartment building sells for $1.6 million
    An Ocean Beach apartment building, located at 4968 Long Branch Ave., has sold for $1.62 million. The five-unit complex is a few blocks from the beach and is within walking distance of restaurants, ...
    Published - Tuesday, July 04
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    Point Loma United Methodist to revive next year
    After 88 years, the Point Loma United Methodist Church closed. But it turns out the closure is only temporary. Church member Victor Neuman noted that PLUMC has appointed a new pastor, the Rev. Jess...
    Published - Tuesday, July 04
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    Slip sliding away at Sunset Cliffs
    In a scene straight out of a light beer commercial, a group of beachgoers built a make shift slip ’n’ slide on a Sunset Cliffs beach and spent the afternoon gliding into the ocean on tubes, boards,...
    Published - Monday, July 03
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    Letter to the editor: New Miramar aircraft causing issues in University City
    Dear Editor,   University City residents, in particular, those living just west of 805 across from Miramar, MCAS runways, have been trying to find a "neighborly" way to open a dialogue with the mil...
    Published - Monday, July 03
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    ‘Incense Man’ killed in Ocean Beach; SDPD searching for suspect
    Walter Riley, known as “Ras” or “Incense Man,” was stabbed to death June 22 on the sidewalk at 1900 Bacon Street, near where he often stood and sold sticks of incense. At 12:28 a.m. on that Thursda...
    Published - Monday, July 03
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    Man robs Von's grocery store manager
    The night manager at the Von's grocery store, at 1702 Garnet Ave., was walking back to the main store after closing up the Von's gas station, located in the parking lot across the street about 11 p...
    Published - Monday, July 03
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    Matson stepping down as football coach, teacher at Mission Bay
    In a tenure that spanned a number of decades, Willie Matson announced that he was retiring from both the teaching and coaching professions at Mission Bay High School. Matson, who had been under a S...
    Published - Monday, July 03
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    Summer trash, street sweeping schedule for Mission Beach
    In an effort to help mitigate fly infestations in Mission Beach, the City of San Diego will increase the number of trash pickups and street sweeping in the community this summer. The changes are th...
    Published - Monday, July 03
    full story
    Beto Vasquez and UCHS Aquatics: Thinking ‘out of the box’
    “Have you heard of the tunnels they dug under Oxy during World War II? I have seen them,” said Beto Vasquez, who graduated from Occidental College with a degree in history in 2012, is speaking to a...
    Published - Monday, July 03
    full story
    Holiday schedule for city offices and services
    All City of San Diego Administrative Offices will be closed on Tuesday, July 4 in observance of the Independence Day holiday. In addition: · All city recreation centers will be closed. · All city p...
    Published - Monday, July 03
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    University City updates: Summer concerts, Marian Bear and more
    Summer Concerts kick off July 9 The University City Summer Concerts lineup kicks off with the band Forecast, who are celebrating 40 years of playing jazz-rock-fusion. Starting in 1977, the band was...
    Published - Monday, July 03
    full story
    Steven Hull’s ‘Man, Myth & Magic’ newest addition to Murals of La Jolla
    Anyone that has driven around La Jolla searching for parking, or simply taken a stroll around the Village, can attest that the “murals” represent the town’s commitment to the arts. Constantly addin...
    Published - Monday, July 03
    full story
    Current Issues(Archives)
    La Jolla Village News, June 15th, 2018
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    La Jolla Village News, June 15th, 2018
    Beach & Bay Press, June 14th, 2018
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    Beach & Bay Press, June 14th, 2018
    The Peninsula Beacon, June 7th, 2018
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    The Peninsula Beacon, June 7th, 2018
    La Jolla Village News Reader's Choice Awards 2018: Best Restaurants
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    La Jolla Village News Reader's Choice Awards 2018: Best Restaurants