test
Sdnews rss feed
    Year in review: Missing money, mainstay issues and much more to come
    by BLAKE BUNCH
    Dec 16, 2017 | 5159 views | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    An aerial view of the Children’s Pool shot via drone. Note the amount of lounging pinnipeds. / PHOTO BY RYAN SHORT
    An aerial view of the Children’s Pool shot via drone. Note the amount of lounging pinnipeds. / PHOTO BY RYAN SHORT
    slideshow
    Over the past year, the La Jolla area has seen its fair share of trying instances. Despite what has happened, however, there always remains an air of positivity in the community. Although things locally, nationally, and internationally may have appeared to have been tough, there were, as always, inevitably some wholly positive and endearing occurrences spotted throughout. We’ve compiled some of the more pressing issues all over La Jolla—from Bird Rock to the Golden Triangle—here’s what went down this past year. JAN. 13 On Dec. 15, La Jolla's Children's Pool, usually closed for the start of the five-month harbor seal pupping season, remained open. That opening remained in effect until the following day, Friday, Dec. 16, when the beach was closed, yet again, after the City of San Diego appealed — and was granted — a temporary stay to protect the marine mammals. In 2014, City Council banned public access at Children's Pool annually from Dec. 15 to May 15 to protect the seals during their pupping season. That action was subsequently challenged in a lawsuit against the city and the California Coastal Commission by Friends of the Children's Pool. A maintenance assessment district (MAD) passed by La Jolla businesses and residents in 2016, that won't go into effect until 2018, challenged by a lawsuit. A group known as La Jolla Benefits Association, LLC, filed a lawsuit on Dec. 28 in San Diego Superior Court. Former San Diego city attorney Michael J. Aguirre is representing the association. The association's suit challenged the MAD, which passed by a 56 percent to 44 percent margin by mail ballot to residents and businesses within La Jolla's downtown Village in November 2016. JAN. 27 The final "One Ocean Shamu" show was conducted at SeaWorld San Diego on Sunday, Jan. 8. Their interim educational orca presentation called a “Killer Whale Presentation” started on Monday, Jan. 9. SeaWorld set up temporary seating (bleachers) around the orca underwater viewing area pool, and provided guests with an educational presentation while the new Orca Encounter backdrop is constructed at the main pool. FEB. 10 A growing perception by some coastal residents, including La Jollans, that they're hearing more noise from commercial airplanes was disputed by a Federal Aviation Administration official at a Jan. 18 Airport Noise Advisory Committee subcommittee meeting. Some residents are insisting they're hearing loud airplane noises in areas previously unexposed. There was quite an impressive turnout for the groundbreaking ceremony at the new Conrad Prebys Performing Arts Center, which will be located at 7600 Fay Ave. for years to come. The $76 million project, of which about $62 million has already been raised, is slated for a grand opening around January of 2019. The 49,000-square-foot facility was designed by Boston-based Epstein Joslin Architects, and will boast a 500-seat concert hall, 140-seat flexible use space, rehearsal rooms, a large open courtyard and offices for the La Jolla Music Society. FEB. 24 A La Jolla man who was the accounts payable supervisor for a Sorrento Valley company plead guilty to embezzling $1.9 million from the firm for vacations, sporting event trips, and renting private jets. Edward K. Abellana, 40, faces up to 23 years in federal prison when he is sentenced on April 7 before U.S. District Court Judge Janis Sammartino. Abellana pleaded guilty to wire fraud and making a false tax return by not disclosing the embezzled funds as income. The tax returns in the charges are from 2012 to 2015. MARCH 10 Following a Feb. 20 bomb threat, which caused La Jolla's Jewish Community Center to be closed and evacuated, officials have struggled to explain why — and what could be done about it. It was the third similar threat this year at the Lawrence Family Jewish Community Center at 4126 Executive Drive. A 31-year-old man, Juan Thompson, was subsequently arrested March 3 in St. Louis. Thompson was allegedly linked to at least eight bogus bomb threats made against Jewish Community Centers across the nation, including La Jolla's, as part of a campaign to harass a former girlfriend. MARCH 24 The tide in the battle by beach residents seeking to restrict – or exclude – short-term vacation rentals in single-family neighborhoods may have turned with an about-face at the city attorney's office. Immediate past City Attorney Jan Goldsmith had maintained rules and regulations governing short-term vacation rentals were vague and needed clarification. New City Attorney Mara Elliott took a completely different tack with her March 15 memorandum of law advising the City Council that they were illegal. Two Mission Beach businessmen were placed on 18 months federal probation. and they paid the U.S. Coast Guard $18,000 for rescuing them after they intentionally sank their boat to try and collect insurance proceeds. Christopher Alan Switzer, 39, of La Jolla, and Mark D. Gillette, 37, of San Diego, were spared any jail time by U.S. District Court Judge Michael Anello. APRIL 21 An allegation surfaced of mismanagement of a playground fund with nonprofit La Jolla Recreation Council, which recently asked its president Cindy Greatrex to step down. An inside source requesting anonymity told La Jolla Village News that an amount of money originally estimated at $40,000 – which has since grown – was reported missing by a recreation council board member. Contacted by La Jolla Village News the morning of April 20, Greatrex, when informed that some playground funds had been reported missing, commented, “There are no missing funds.” MAY 5 Following the April 30 shooting at the La Jolla Crossroads apartment complex, which left Monique Clark, a 35-year-old mother of three, dead, several victims and witnesses were hesitant to dismiss the notion, provided by San Diego Police Chief Shelley Zimmerman, that race did not play a factor in the shooting. The shooter, 49-year-old Peter Raymond Selis, was white. Seven others were injured in the shooting. According to reports, four women and three men were shot. On Thursday, April 29, the City of San Diego Planning Commission voted unanimously to recommend approval of the Beverly and Joseph Glickman Hillel Center, to be located at the intersection of La Jolla Village Drive and Torrey Pines Road. “This is a very important day for us,” said Robert Lapidus, longtime chair of the Hillel Facilities Committee. “We have been working for nearly two decades on this project, and the Planning Commission’s vote brings us one step closer to making the Glickman Hillel Center a reality.” MAY 19 A senior couple was found dead with gunshot wounds in a suspected murder-suicide in a posh home in La Jolla's Mount Soledad about 7:30 p.m. on May 16. The deceased were identified by police early the following day as John Mattiace, 80, and Jilavi Parvaneh, 60, a married woman. Their bodies were discovered by police responding to the couple's son's request for a welfare check on his parents at their $3 million home at 5579 Avenida Fiesta in a cul-de-sac near Pacifica Drive. JUNE 2 A University City man accused of illegally selling firearms and heroin will next appear in federal court on June 8. Paul Joseph Holdy, 39, pleaded not guilty to three charges, but could face more counts after acting U.S. Attorney Alana Robinson said 19 firearms, including short barrel machine guns, were sold to undercover agents. With this past winter’s torrential rains, however, one of the most popular trails, the Broken Hill Trail, faced some safety issues resulting from erosion. This deterioration is why the California Conservation Corps have been hard at work since January working eight days on and six days off. JUNE 30 “Embracing the Beauty of Diversity in Our World” was the title of the public address given by Tenzin Gyatso, His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama on Friday, June 16 at UC San Diego’s RIMAC Field. His Holiness, now 81 years old, had flown in from Rochester, N.Y. the day before, but was cheerful and energetic as he delivered his 35-minute message about the importance of compassion. JULY 14 A woman who was charged with setting four coffee carts on fire at the University of California San Diego was committed on Friday, July 7 to a state psychiatric hospital because a judge found her mentally incompetent. Criminal proceedings remain suspended against Kay Lyn Williamson, 30, who was arrested after the bizarre April 17 incident in which four separate coffee kiosks were set on fire at different parts of the campus around midnight. San Diego Superior Court Judge Margo Woods read the psychiatric evaluation of Williamson before ordering her to go to Patton State Hospital for up to three years. JULY 28 La Jolla's Salk Institute for Biological Studies is one of the world's most renowned independent, non-profit, scientific research institutes. But does it discriminate against its tenured female scientists? That's the subject of a lawsuit filed by Victoria J. Lundblad, PhD, and Kathy Jones, PhD, which claims Salk has “allowed an old boys club to dominate creating a hostile work environment for Salk tenured women professors.” An angry La Jolla driver who rammed a parking enforcement vehicle after he got a parking ticket was sentenced July 28 after he pleaded guilty to assault with a vehicle. Court records say Peter Alex Dreier, 42, of Hillcrest, would likely be placed on three years probation, but could be sentenced up to a year in county jail in San Diego Superior Court. AUG. 11 On Friday, July 28, a group effort by a team of concerned beachgoers (both young and old), lifeguards, and SeaWorld Animal Health and Rescue personnel rescued a beached pygmy sperm whale that was stranded near Scripps tower. It is uncertain whether lifeguards or beachgoers first noticed the struggling sea mammal, but after sending off pictures and video of the animal to the necessary experts, everyone sprung into action. Unfortunately, it later died from its injuries. AUG. 25 Two men were ordered to stand trial for robbing a La Jolla man during a home invasion burglary. One man was additionally ordered to stand trial for a murder in Santee. Witnesses testified for three days in the preliminary hearing in El Cajon Superior Court in the case against Jose Nunez Torres, 22, and Gustavo Ceron, 25. Both men are charged with robbing Robert Hill, who testified they climbed through his kitchen window on Oct. 12, 2016. SEP. 8 An arrest warrant and Superior Court case alleges Cindy Greatrex stole $67,935.86 from the La Jolla Park and Recreation Committee while president of that group between May 2016 and February 2017. She and her attorney answered that claim is false — and they have the documentation to prove it. SEP. 22 n The San Diego City Council voted 5-3 Tuesday along party lines to oppose President Donald Trump's proposal to construct a billon-dollar wall at the U.S.-Mexico border. The City Council's five Democrats voted in favor of Councilmember Georgette Gomez's resolution to oppose Trump's executive order to build a wall and to oppose a House bill seeking to fund it from a fee on remittance transactions sent from the U.S. to several other countries. OCT. 6 n The San Diego City Council unanimously declared a shelter crisis Oct.2 as it related to the hepatitis A outbreak that has killed 17 people who were mostly homeless. Mayor Kevin Faulconer endorsed the action, saying it would help in setting up three temporary shelters for the homeless soon including one in the Midway District, which will be located at a Navy-owned lot in the 2700 block of Sports Arena Drive. n One of three lifeguard towers built in La Jolla during the past decade, construction on the Children's Pool Tower began in early 2013. It was opened June 27. Almost immediately, the tower's public restrooms began backing up and leaking into lifeguard showers and locker rooms, temporarily closing public toilets and forcing lifeguards to retreat into a temporary trailer. OCT. 20 On Oct. 18, a day before his centennial birthday, La Jolla Shores boardwalk was renamed Walter Munk Way honoring the esteemed scientist. Walter Heinrich Munk was born on Oct. 19, 1917. He is a physical oceanographer and professor of geophysics emeritus at Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla. He is one of the world's foremost authorities on winds, waves, and other projects. NOV. 3 The YMCA of San Diego County was fined $17,000 on Oct. 20 and ordered to abide by numerous probation conditions for a chlorine spill that sickened 79 elementary students and eight adults in 2015. The YMCA, as a nonprofit corporation, pleaded guilty to four felony counts and one misdemeanor that involved a hazardous waste spill. NOV. 17 Citing the hepatitis A outbreak and ongoing renovations, Mary, Star of the Sea, a Catholic church in La Jolla, decided to abruptly halt a charitable program that has consistently fed the needy for more than nine years. Through the program, So Others May Eat, meals that were provided every second Tuesday of each month will no longer be served at the church. So Others May Eat alternates weekly, providing meals to the less fortunate at Sacred Heart Church in Ocean Beach and Mary, Star of the Sea. In 2015, Sharon Wampler and about 80 of her Bird Rock neighbors started out on a quest to clarify — and tighten — some of the city's rules governing so-called “McMansions,” oversized homes on undersized lots.
    Comments
    (0)
    Comments-icon Post a Comment
    No Comments Yet
    Mission Bay Park Committee votes to keep golf course, add wetlands to De Anza Cove plan
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Dec 14, 2017 | 15508 views | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Mission Bay Park Committee voted Dec. 6 for a preferred alternative for the De Anza Revitalization Plan that pleased recreationalists but few others, especially not environmentalists who decried the decision as “token.” Overriding objections from environmentalists to delay rather than rush its choice, the park committee voted 5-3 in favor of “alternative 2,” which will now be forwarded for city environmental review.  “Unfortunately, the two concepts presented by the city were driven by misguided priorities that ultimately fail to reach the goals of the Mission Bay Park Master Plan,” said Rebecca Schwartz Lesberg of nonprofit San Diego Audubon. “It’s disappointing to watch the city push concepts that are not resilient to sea level rise, ignoring the inevitable. These concepts place the burden of responding to climate change on future generations, and miss the opportunity to prepare our region for shrinking coastlines.” To adequately protect wetlands in Mission Bay, Schwartz Lesberg said, the city would need to dedicate at least 200 acres — less than 5 percent of Mission Bay — to habitat. The preferred plan currently only has around 30 to 40 acres set aside for wetlands, increasing the less than 2 percent of wetlands in the bay to less than 3 percent.  The city’s Mission Bay Park Master Plan requires wetlands restoration and improvements aimed at protecting those marsh areas, Schwartz Lesberg noted. She said the alternative selected “Does very little to correct the bay-wide imbalance that has for decades favored commerce and recreation at the expense of the environment.” A regional park, Mission Bay has a city-owned, 18-hole golf course as well as ball fields and tennis and volleyball courts. It includes dog-friendly, off-leash Fiesta Island. The park is home to a myriad of aquatic interests — boating, swimming, kayaking, etc. There is also lodging at Campland on the Bay, which provides RV and tent camping. Recreationalists were generally pleased by the committee’s selection of alternative 2, which spares the 50-plus year-old Mission Bay Golf Course. Some wanted the golf course downsized or eliminated altogether, arguing it took up too much park space and that it has been operating at a deficit for years. The preferred plan, alternative 2, allows for 38 acres of wetland. A total of 40 acres are also set aside for “guest housing.” The plan also considers creation of ball fields and a restaurant, while providing beach access for water sports that don’t rely on combustible engines. The fate of Campland on the Bay, whose supporters testified at the Dec. 6 park committee meeting that their families have enjoyed the camp for as many as three generations, remains uncertain. Approximately 80 percent of Campland’s visitors are San Diegans. Campland presently pays about $3 million in transit occupancy taxes and rent. Jacob Gelfand, vice president of operations at Campland on the Bay, said it would be a mistake to ignore the importance of lodging in planning for De Anza Cove. “Campland has been a beloved local asset, coming up on 50 years,” Gelfand said. “Any plan the city puts forward should reflect the community’s need for continuing waterfront camping access.” Said Gelfand: “There’s been a lot written in the media about perceived conflict between camping and other potential uses. For the last 50 years, Campland has been a dedicated environmental steward and neighbor to the Kendall-Frost Marsh. A lot of our campsites overlook the wetlands marsh, and there really is a symbiotic relationship between the marsh and the camp, with a lot of our tenants requesting sites with views of the marsh so they can reconnect with the natural environment.” ReWild Mission Bay is a project of San Diego Audubon to enhance and restore up to 170 acres of wetlands in the northeast corner of Mission Bay. Wetlands including marshes, mud flats and riverbanks, which are instrumental in attracting wildlife, fostering a diverse ecosystem, improving water quality and protecting communities from flooding by providing a cushion during high tides.  Today, only about 1 percent of the historic 4,500 acres of Mission Bay wetlands remain, which leads environmentalists to conclude that ReWild Mission Bay is a critical and time-sensitive project for the area. “Both of the De Anza Revitalization plans reconnect Kendall-Frost Marsh with Rose Creek, which will help the remaining 40 acres of wetlands survive,” said Schwartz Lesberg previously. “What is missing from both alternatives is the long-term view to ensure wetlands can continue to create cleaner water, buffer communities from sea-level rise, provide habitat for wildlife, and get people out in nature. If they (wetlands) disappear — so do those services.”
    Comments
    (0)
    Comments-icon Post a Comment
    No Comments Yet
    King tides make a splash – show shoreline susceptible to sea level rise
    Dec 06, 2017 | 27992 views | 0 0 comments | 7 7 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    A photographer gets splashed as a huge wave crashes over the stairs to Garbage Beach during a king tide on Tuesday, Dec. 5. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    A photographer gets splashed as a huge wave crashes over the stairs to Garbage Beach during a king tide on Tuesday, Dec. 5. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    slideshow
    Ocean Beach resident Maddie Drinkward looks on as a huge wave heads toward her during the king tide on Tuesday morning. / PHOTO BY THOMAS MELVILLE
    Ocean Beach resident Maddie Drinkward looks on as a huge wave heads toward her during the king tide on Tuesday morning. / PHOTO BY THOMAS MELVILLE
    slideshow
    Some of the year's highest tides, known as “king tides,” hit the California shoreline this week, providing a glimpse of what the state can expect as sea levels rise in the coming years. This winter, the largest tides took place on Dec. 3, 4, and 5, and will take place again Jan. 1 and 2. The California King Tides Project is asking the public to go outside and photograph these ultra-high tides to illustrate how homes, harbors, beaches, wetlands, seawalls, and public access to the coast will be affected by future sea level rise. During king tides, nearly all of the Kendall Frost Marsh Reserve in Mission Bay is flooded with water, giving researchers insight into what the new normal will be for this remnant wetland under rising seas. Endangered Light-footed Ridgway's Rails live and nest in this 40-acre habitat, the only piece remaining of what was once 4,000 acres of wetlands in Mission Bay. The king tides push the birds to the margins of the salt marsh to stay out of the water and researchers use this opportunity to count this otherwise hard-to-spot secretive marsh bird.  Mission Bay’s wetlands supply habitat for hundreds of local wildlife species, protect San Diego from climate change impacts such as flooding, and improve water quality. In addition to using the high tides as a chance to document the number of Ridgway’s Rails in Mission Bay, San Diego Audubon encourages residents to use this as a visual opportunity to understand why the region must ensure protection and restoration of its wetlands so that they can continue to create cleaner water, buffer communities from sea level rise, provide habitat for wildlife, and get people into nature.  State and local officials and climate change researchers use the images taken during the king tides season to validate sea level rise models and better assess local flood vulnerabilities for planning purposes. Recent advances in the science of sea level rise and climate modeling have brought increased attention to the importance of these planning efforts. This includes the California Ocean Protection Council’s updated Sea Level Rice Guidance, which is open for public comment through Dec. 15.
    Comments
    (0)
    Comments-icon Post a Comment
    No Comments Yet
    ISA Adaptive Surf Competition in La Jolla adds women’s division
    by BLAKE BUNCH
    Dec 01, 2017 | 37475 views | 0 0 comments | 12 12 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Dani Burt lost her right leg above the knee in a motorcycle accident, but since has learned how to surf - progressing to capture the 2016 WSA adaptive surfing championship. She will look for another title at this weekend’s adaptive surf competition. / PHOTO BY PAT WEBER
    Dani Burt lost her right leg above the knee in a motorcycle accident, but since has learned how to surf - progressing to capture the 2016 WSA adaptive surfing championship. She will look for another title at this weekend’s adaptive surf competition. / PHOTO BY PAT WEBER
    slideshow
    New Jersey native Dani Burt grew up skateboarding and bodyboarding, but always found a primal need to be in the ocean. Prior to her losing her right leg (above her knee) in a motorcycle accident, however, she had never been surfing. Now Burt, a doctor of physical therapy at Scripps Memorial Hospital, has been named the 2016 WSA US champion in adaptive surfing and looks to secure another title. Between Nov. 29 and Dec. 3, she will be competing in the Stance Adaptive World Surfing Championship at La Jolla Shores. Presented by Vissla and the City of San Diego, this is the first year that Burt will be able to surf in a women’s-only division. “I was in Hawaii about 10 or 11 years ago for the Duke’s Festival. This was after the accident, after watching a lot of the competitions, I knew I had to get back in the water,” said Burt. “Around this time, however, there weren’t any ‘surf legs,’ so I had to rig one up and some of my surfer friends took me out.” While her background, developed balance and board knowledge helped push her forward, like most starting something from scratch, she had her doubts. It wasn’t until a chance meeting with legendary surfer and shaper Donald Takayama at his Oceanside shop that she dialed it in. “It was truly inspiring, as he is someone who I definitely looked up to,” said Burt. “We were talking at the shop one day, and he was like ‘here, take a board.’ He was a huge influence on me. For the ISA contest, I have a 9-foot-long Takayama and a 7-foot-10-inch-long pintail mini in my quiver.” Prior to this year’s contest, there weren’t enough women to comprise a women’s “para surfing” (adaptive surfing) division, so Burt competed in the mixed-gender division. Despite being the minority sex in her group, she went on to capture the 2016 title, as well as come in second this year. In 2016, the event featured seven women from five countries across three divisions. The inclusion of a separate women’s division has played a key role in more than doubling women’s participation in this year’s contest.  “The ISA is proud to be actively promoting and developing women’s surfing around the globe,” said ISA president Fernando Aguerre. “Creating an opportunity for women in the Stance ISA World Adaptive Surfing Championship is just another step in working towards complete gender equality, which is the ultimate goal.”
    Comments
    (0)
    Comments-icon Post a Comment
    No Comments Yet
    City approves millions for upgrades to Mission Bay Park
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Nov 29, 2017 | 10108 views | 1 1 comments | 10 10 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Sunset Point, Vacation Isle Park, Ingraham Street bridge, Ski Beach, and Government Island in Mission Bay. / PHOTO BY THOMAS MELVILLE
    Sunset Point, Vacation Isle Park, Ingraham Street bridge, Ski Beach, and Government Island in Mission Bay. / PHOTO BY THOMAS MELVILLE
    slideshow
    San Diego officials have unveiled plans to spend $117 million during the next decade upgrading Mission Bay Park, providing new amenities, restoring marshland and creating additional habitat for endangered species. New amenities for Mission Bay Park will include cycling and pedestrian paths, playgrounds, a fitness course, lighting, signs, landscaping, resurfaced parking lots and rehabilitation of the seawall. “This is very good news,” said Mission Beach Town Council president Gary Wonacott. “The town council has been promoting the restoration of the Boardwalk seawall for some time. The Mission Bay Park area truly serves all of San Diego. This investment is money well spent.”   Proposition C, approved by voters in 2008, mapped out a specific list of priority improvement projects for Mission Bay Park. Measure J, approved in 2016, allowed for multiple projects on the priority list to be pursued simultaneously, “As long as they did not preclude the completion of higher-priority projects,” said City spokesman Tim Graham. “The first few projects on the priority list require lengthy environmental analysis. We have, therefore, developed a plan that will first implement several projects such as new comfort stations, playgrounds and parking lots,” Graham said. San Diego Park and Recreation has started an evaluation of park amenities such as playgrounds, comfort stations and parking lots, said Graham. A 10-year Mission Bay Park Improvement Fund allocation plan, developed by Park and Recreation staff, will be considered by the City Council on Monday, Dec. 4. Before being amended, the regulations required the park’s share of lease revenues to be devoted to two priorities: dredging the floor of the bay to boost boating opportunities, and restoration of marshland, which helps fight sea-level rise. New charter amendments maintain those priorities, but allow the city to begin spending money on lower-priority projects, while lengthy environmental approvals are secured for dredging and marshland restoration. Graham said dredging and marshland restoration nonetheless still top the park's priority list. “The dredging project is designed to return navigational boating safety to Mission Bay,” he said. “It is scheduled to last approximately five to six months. Wetland creation and restoration is designed to improve the bay’s water quality.” How will marshland habitat be restored? “Campland’s 40 acres next to Kendall-Frost (preserve) will be converted to new wetland/marshland,” said Graham. “The goal is to first filter low-flow runoff from Rose Creek before it reaches the bay. De Anza will have new wetland along Rose Creek and around its perimeter. New wetland restoration will also take place at Cudahy and Tecolote creeks where they enter the bay.”   How long will it take the city to get environmental approvals for dredging/habitat restoration?   “The dredging project is currently permitted,” Graham said. “We anticipate commencing the project in December or early January.” Graham added habitat restoration environmental review most likely will take at least three years. “Any eelgrass impacted from the dredging project will be mitigated through the planting of new eelgrass,” he said. “Any impacts to nesting least terns will be minimized.” Graham said funds to upgrade the park are “100 percent Mission Bay Park lease revenues generated annually in Mission Bay Park and earmarked specifically for improvements in the park.” The city spokesperson said the park’s annual lease revenues are approximately $30 million. The first $20 million goes to the city's general fund. The remaining $10 million is allocated 65 percent to the Mission Bay Park Improvement Fund and 35 percent to the San Diego Regional Parks Improvement Fund. The San Diego Charter restricts capital improvements in Mission Bay to complete the following prioritized projects: • Restoration of navigable waters and elimination of navigable hazards; • Wetland expansion and water-quality improvements; • Restoration of shoreline treatments; • Expansion of endangered or threatened species preserves and habitats; and • Deferred maintenance projects.
    Comments
    (1)
    Comments-icon Post a Comment
    Magie Nicholas
    |
    December 06, 2017
    HOW TO GET YOUR DIVORCE EX HUSBAND & WIFE BACK BEFORE XMAS

    I want to really use this medium to thank powerful Dr. Ugo wonders for helping me get my broken home back after my husband of 18 years left me for another lady. Two months ago my Husband filed for a divorce through his lawyer when we had no issues at all. i was surprised because our family was a very happy one with three beautiful kids that even neighbors were jealous of us. i never knew a girl he met at the mall cast a spell on him so he will love her alone and forget about his family. i tried all ways to reach him and make peace ordinarily but i could not because the potency of the spell was so high on him that he could not even get himself. a friend of mine who felt pity for me introduced me to Dr. Ugo through his email ( generalspelltemple@gmail.com ) so i contacted Dr. Ugo and told him all about my marital problem. He assured me that he will help me and that my husband will be back to me in 24 hours, i trusted him because he had worked for my friend who wont stop testifying about him. To my greatest surprise, after 24 hours of contacting Dr. Ugo, my husband called me to start begging and immediately came back to us and now we are happy family again. i cant stop thanking Dr. Ugo wonders and i advice anyone out there with any relationship or marriage problem to contact him immediately for help through his email generalspelltemple@gmail.com or call his mobile

    phone number 1 383-336-9876

    News
    Locals get first look at new Law Street lifeguard tower
    Residents got their first glimpse at preliminary design plans for a new lifeguard tower in North Pacific Beach off Law Street at a July 16 Pacific Beach Planning Group (PBPG) subcommittee meeting. ...
    Published - Monday, July 27
    full story
    Clinton to hold fundraiser in La Jolla on Aug. 7
    Former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton is scheduled to hold a fundraiser for her campaign for the 2016 Democratic presidential nomination at the La Jolla home of Qualcomm co-founder Irwin...
    Published - Monday, July 27
    full story
    Junior Lifeguard Foundation proposes building in Mission Beach
    Lifeguards, aspiring lifeguards and their parents turned out at Mission Beach Precise Planning Board’s (MBPPB’s) July 21 meeting to support presentation of conceptual renderings of a proposed Junio...
    Published - Monday, July 27
    full story
    IDW Publishing earns accolades, awards at Comic-Con
    IDW Publishing, one of the nation’s largest comic book publishers, which opened new headquarters in Liberty Station recently, had 11 nominations – and won three awards – at this year’s San Diego Co...
    Published - Sunday, July 26
    full story
    Point Loma High grad battling back from near fatal shooting
    On any balmy summer night, hundreds of people can be found strolling the length of the Ocean Beach Pier. But for one frequent visitor, that stroll remains a struggle. Will Barton steps cautiously a...
    Published - Saturday, July 25
    full story
    Maruta Gardner is the graffiti 'eradicator' in Mission and Pacific beaches
    Cleansing communities of graffiti is a dirty job, but somebody’s got to do it. In Mission and Pacific beaches for the last 24 years, that “somebody” has been retired school principal Maruta Gardner...
    Published - Friday, July 24
    full story
    Buyer found for former Midway Post Office site
    The United States Postal Service (USPS) is in negotiations with a buyer for the abandoned Midway Post Office site, once the central mail processing and distribution facility for all of San Diego Co...
    Published - Friday, July 24
    full story
    Point Loma High to hold 90th Anniversary Gala, will revive the school’s hall of fame
    An upcoming 90th Anniversary Gala celebration of Point Loma High School's history will coincide with the induction of newly elected members of a revived hall of fame that plans to add new alumni an...
    Published - Friday, July 24
    full story
    Peninsula planning discusses pocket park, billboard issues
    In July Peninsula Community Planning Board (PCPB), after lengthy discussion, tabled a motion to spend more than $800,000 in development impact fees (DIF) for creation of a pocket park at the end of...
    Published - Friday, July 24
    full story
    Midway group listens to pitch from medical marijuana reps
    Midway Community Planning Group (MCPG) heard a pitch from attorneys representing medical marijuana cooperatives, who expressed that industry’s willingness to work with the community to help solve l...
    Published - Wednesday, July 22
    full story
    Pacific Beach student wins statewide Business Plan Pitch Competition
    In a unanimous decision, San Diego Mesa College students Tyler Aloe, of Pacific Beach, and Celine Ahearn, of North Park, earned first place in the statewide “Get a Taste of Success” Business Plan P...
    Published - Wednesday, July 22
    full story
    Education Notebook: Mission Bay High students visit Europe
    Mission Bay High A group of Mission Bay High School students recently returned from a two-week trip through Europe. The students started their tour in Rome and visited Piazza Navona, the Colosseum,...
    Published - Tuesday, July 21
    full story
    Realtor discusses changes to allow more ground-floor office space in La Jolla
    Opposition to a recent proposal to change zoning on the ground-floor of a Village building to allow more office and less retail space could be misplaced, a La Jolla commercial Realtor said. “The of...
    Published - Saturday, July 18
    full story
    McMansions on the menu again at Community Planning Association
    In July, La Jolla Community Planning Association (LJCPA) elected new board officers as well as hearing public testimony about encroaching “mansionization” in the community. Board president Joe LaCa...
    Published - Friday, July 17
    full story
    Current Issues(Archives)
    The Peninsula Beacon, December 14th,2017
    download The Peninsula Beacon, December 14th,2017
    The Peninsula Beacon, December 14th,2017
    La Jolla Village News, December 15th, 2017
    download La Jolla Village News, December 15th, 2017
    La Jolla Village News, December 15th, 2017
    Beach & Bay Press, December 14th, 2017
    download Beach & Bay Press, December 14th, 2017
    Beach & Bay Press, December 14th, 2017
    The Peninsula Beacon, December 7th, 2017
    download The Peninsula Beacon, December 7th, 2017
    The Peninsula Beacon, December 7th, 2017