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    La Jolla news and community briefs
    Jul 14, 2018 | 7988 views | 0 0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    A standup paddler takes in the sunset while framed by Scripps Pier DON BALCH/VILLAGE NEWS
    A standup paddler takes in the sunset while framed by Scripps Pier DON BALCH/VILLAGE NEWS
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    SD Rules Committee votes in favor of single-use plastic reduction ordinance The Rules Committee voted 3-2 in favor of the proposed ban on Polystyrene foam and restrictions on single-use plastics in the City of San Diego ordinance, which now moves to a full City Council vote as early as September. Councilmembers Chris Ward, President Pro Tem Barbara Bry, and Myrtle Cole - who chairs the Rules Committee - voted in favor. Councilmembers’ Chris Kersey and Chris Cate voted against. Representatives from Surfrider Foundation, 5 Gyres Institute, SD350.org, Teamsters Local 911, California Grocers’ Association, and Business For Good all spoke in support of the ordinance, which would place restrictions on the use of expanded polystyrene (commonly referred to as styrofoam), and reduce the distribution of other types of single-use plastics in San Diego. Surfrider San Diego volunteers collected 12,575 pieces of expanded polystyrene from San Diego beaches in 2017 alone. Unfortunately, the majority is blown into the ocean because it is light in weight and easily breaks into tiny, uncollectible pieces. Once in the ocean, polystyrene is often mistaken as food by marine life and ingestion of the single-use plastics can become fatal. Surfrider volunteers have successfully advocated for single-use plastic reduction ordinances of EPS in Solana Beach, Encinitas, and Imperial Beach. “The Rules Committee took a significant step today by approving the Plastic Reduction Ordinance for a full city council vote,” said Michael Torti, Executive Committee Chair of Surfrider Foundation’s San Diego Chapter. “We ask our volunteers and members to contact their district city councilmember and declare their support for the proposed ordinance to ban polystyrene foam products and restrict the use of single-use plastics.” Surfrider Foundation’s 250,000 members, volunteers, and advocates support the adoption of the Single Use Plastic Reduction Ordinance. This ordinance would restrict the sale and distribution of polystyrene foam products for use as food service ware, fish and meat trays, egg cartons, and coolers in the City of San Diego. Furthermore, the proposal would make single-use plastic foodware, such as straws and utensils, available only upon request. For additional information, surfridersd.org/ or contact Michael Torti (info above) or Roger Kube, Policy Advisor for 5 Gyres Institute at 619.701.4027 or roger@5gyres.org Coastkeeper, Port of San Diego bring climate science to local schools San Diego Coastkeeper and the Port of San Diego have launched a new set of bilingual lessons featuring water and climate science, available for use in local schools. The lessons are the latest addition to Coastkeeper’s Water Education For All program, a standards-aligned K-12 science curriculum available free of cost to San Diego-area teachers and informal educators.  Funded by the Port’s Environmental Fund, the new water and climate lessons guide students in learning about how human activities influence the natural world. By participating in the lessons, students learn how to calculate their personal carbon footprint and plastic usage, and are empowered to develop and implement plans to reduce their impact and share outcomes with their families, friends, and communities. The lesson plan is hands-on, inquiry-based, and standards-aligned to help teachers ensure their students achieve Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) and Common Core State Standards (CCSS).  “We believe that as environmental educators, our job is not only to inform local students of the challenges that face them, but equip them with the tools they need to develop real-life solutions to those challenges,” says Coastkeeper Education Manager Sandra Lebrón. “Climate change and plastic pollution are two of the largest issues facing the next generation. By providing students with engaging, locally-rooted science education, we are empowering San Diego’s youth to take the lead in creating a better world for us all.” The new lessons were piloted at five local schools in the San Diego Bay watershed, where 598 4-8th Grade students received water and climate education and learned about how climate change affects the marine, coastal, and intertidal habitats of San Diego Bay. Two of the five schools completed additional carbon and plastic reduction projects. Pre-and post-lesson evaluations showed increases in student understanding about the causes of rising levels of greenhouse gases, the impacts of human activities on the environment, and steps that can be taken to reduce carbon emissions and decrease plastic use.  Teachers interested in utilizing these new water and climate lessons are encouraged to visit sdcoastkeeper.org or get in touch with San Diego Coastkeeper Education Manager Sandra Lebrón at slebron@sdcoastkeeper.org or 619-758-7743 Ext.125. For more information about Port of San Diego Environment, visit portofsandiego.com. Bird Rock Coffee Roasters launches barista-created drink menu Bird Rock Coffee Roasters recemtly announced the start of their barista-created drink menu, starting with two drinks featured this summer. Though Bird Rock Coffee staff have created drinks for the seasonal menu in the past, this is the first time that the company is formalizing the process to include these new barista-created and seasonal drink offerings all year long.  The summer drinks are served over ice and include: The Dirty Horchata, created by barista and store manager of the Bird Rock Coffee Roasters location in La Jolla,, Bianca Carbajal; it is a cold brew coffee mixed with a house-made horchata and is $4.75 for 16-ounce “The Dirty Horchata” was so popular in its testing phase that it sold out in all four locations within a couple of days. The second drink is the Café Rose, created by lead barista Kat Adams, and is made with sparkling water, house-made pomegranate-hibiscus-rose water syrup, and espresso served over ice; it is $5 for 16 ounces. “Our baristas are the best people to innovate new and exciting drinks since they know what our customers love and they know our coffee flavor profiles so well,” said Jeff Taylor, co-owner of Bird Rock Coffee Roasters. “We want to continue to provide the best coffee the world has to offer, and to also surprise our customers with new, out-of-the-box drink recipes that highlight the creative imaginations of our outstanding staff.” Both the Dirty Horchata and the Café Rose drinks are available at all four Bird Rock Coffee Roasters locations until the end of summer. Each drink created and selected for the special menu throughout the year will have a shot at becoming a permanent menu item if successful with customers. Bird Rock Coffee Roasters was the first to introduce direct trade and origin-sourced coffees to the San Diego community. The roaster has received numerous accolades for their coffee, including the national Good Food Awards in 2016 and 2017, best coffee in San Diego from multiple national and local outlets, and the national “Micro Roaster of the Year” award in 2012. In 2017, PT’s Coffee Roasting Co. acquired Bird Rock Coffee Roasters, allowing for expansion in size and scope. To learn more about Bird Rock Coffee Roasters, please visit www.birdrockcoffee.com UC San Diego swimming, diving programs join Mountain Pacific Sports Federation The University of California San Diego men's and women's swimming and diving programs are joining the Mountain Pacific Sports Federation (MPSF), with immediate effect for the 2018-19 season. The MPSF Administrative Committee granted the membership. The league made the announcement on July 6. The change in league alignment comes after UC San Diego's sustained long-term success in the Pacific Collegiate Swimming and Diving Conference (PCSC). The Tritons depart following a decade of dominance as winners of the last 10 PCSC championships in a row by both their men and women. The women brought home 15 PCSC trophies in total, and the men 11, since 2002. The switch to the MPSF is in line with UC San Diego's move from the NCAA Division II level to Division I in the fall of 2020. All of the Tritons' new opponents in the MPSF will be Division I foes. Their addition gives the MPSF 14 teams in the sport, eight on the women's side and six for the men. UC San Diego will compete in the 2019 MPSF Championships against BYU, Cal Poly, Hawai'i, Pacific, UC Santa Barbara, UC Davis (women), and local rivals from the University of San Diego (women). The swim portion of the 2019 conference meet is set to be held Feb. 20-23 at East Los Angeles College (ELAC) in Monterey Park for the eighth straight year, while diving will be contested Feb. 21-23 at the Rose Bowl Aquatics Center in Pasadena for the sixth year in a row. The Tritons previously competed at ELAC during a pair of PCSC Championships (2016, 2017) and multiple editions of the A3 Performance Invitational (2013, 2014, 2015, 2016). The Big West does not sponsor men's or women's swimming and diving, though Cal Poly, Hawai'i, UC Santa Barbara and UC Davis are traditional members in all sports like UC San Diego will be. The Tritons annually contest dual meets at UC Santa Barbara toward the beginning of their competition calendar in the first week of November, with the women squaring off with USD at the end of the regular season. They have topped the Toreros in six straight meetings and 15 of the last 17 (15-1-1). UC San Diego's 2018-19 schedule will be published in the coming weeks.
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    La Jolla news and community briefs
    Jun 29, 2018 | 28308 views | 0 0 comments | 10 10 recommendations | email to a friend | print
     Beachgoers gawk at powerful waves exploding right outside the famed WindanSea Beach shack earlier this month. DON BALCH/VILLAGE NEWS
    Beachgoers gawk at powerful waves exploding right outside the famed WindanSea Beach shack earlier this month. DON BALCH/VILLAGE NEWS
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    UC San Diego’s EV charging program awarded for modeling ‘Energy System of the Future’ The campus is the first higher education institution to be recognized with an award from Greentech Media. The University of California San Diego has been honored with the 2018 Grid Edge Innovation Award for serving as an epicenter for research, development and commercialization on smart electric vehicle (EV) charging. UC San Diego has collaborations with more than 18 companies and organizations in providing 135 EV charging stations on campus. In May alone, more than 700 different EVs were charged by UC San Diego’s world-renowned microgrid. UC San Diego is the first university to receive a Grid Edge Innovation Award from Greentech Media, a leading information services company for technologies, markets and businesses shaping the future of the electricity sector. Representatives from the campus will officially accept the honor on June 21 at a ceremony in San Francisco. “Our efforts in the electrification of transportation have benefited from the microgrid, and both are great examples of how UC San Diego has been leading the way in decarbonizing energy,” said Vice Chancellor of Resource Management and Planning, Gary C. Matthews. “This is key to our efforts, as we approach the milestone of becoming carbon neutral by 2025.” Collectively, UC San Diego charges over 700 unique EV drivers each month, which represents a monthly reduction in 5,400 gallons of avoided gasoline being used. The number of such drivers is expected to continue to climb, as UC San Diego experiences an annual growth rate of 120 percent in EV commuters to campus. A microgrid is a local energy grid with control capability, which means it can disconnect from the traditional grid and operate autonomously. UC San Diego has one of the country’s first and best-studied microgrids. It consists of two 13.5 MW gas turbines, one 3 MW steam turbine, a 2.8 MW fuel cell, a 2.2 MW solar-cell installation, 2.5 MW/5 MWH of battery electric storage and more than eight million gallons of thermal energy storage. The success of the microgrid has propelled additional “green innovation” such as the EV charging which the campus began exploring as early as 2011. UC San Diego’s microgrid powers 85 percent of the 1,160 acres -campus’ electricity needs, 95 percent of its heating, and 95 percent of its cooling.  The reliability and resiliency of the grid has allowed the university to cut costs, while mitigating carbon emissions. It is estimated it is saving the campus about $850,000 a month, compared to buying retail energy. According to Greentech, this year’s winners represent the top projects involving the innovative applications of grid edge technologies, and they offer solutions to the technical, business and regulatory challenges of distributed energy integration. Alliance Healthcare awards youth organization Alliance Healthcare Foundation (AHF), located in La Jolla, has awarded Just in Time for Foster Youth (JIT) with a $100,000 Mission Support grant and the San Diego Center for Children with a $35,000 Mission Support grant. This grant will support JIT’s work to engage a caring community to help transition-age foster youth achieve self-sufficiency and well-being and will allow the San Diego Center for Children to improve access, timely care and a more effective, family-centered treatment approach for children, teens and their families who are struggling with mental, emotional or behavioral health disorders. This is the third consecutive year JIT has received a Mission Support grant from AHF. This year’s $100,000 grant will allow JIT to innovate and improve its services for young people who exit the foster care system without family support. The grant is part of AHF’s nine-year commitment to nonprofit organizations dedicated to advancing health and wellness in San Diego and Imperial counties. Just in Time for Foster Youth mobilizes a caring community to help young adults leaving the foster care system stay on the path to self-sufficiency, ultimately allowing them to become more confident, capable and connected while breaking the cycle of dependence. This is achieved through a variety of initiatives that empower participants while helping them attain stable housing, essential education, meaningful employment, financial security, reliable transportation, positive relationships and more.  The San Diego Center for Children, founded in 1887, is the oldest children’s nonprofit in San Diego. The Center provides therapeutic care, specialized education and critical life skills to more than 1,000 children and their families in eight locations and hundreds of homes across the county. George’s La Jolla makes OpenTable ‘100 Best Al Fresco Restaurants’ OpenTable, the world's leading provider of online restaurant reservations and part of Booking Holdings, Inc. (NASDAQ: BKNG) recently unveiled the 100 Best Al Fresco Restaurants in America for 2018. From the oceanside views at Leilani’s on the Beach in Hawaii and the stunning desert scenery at LON’s at The Hermosa Resort in Arizona to New York City’s Tavern on the Green, an oasis in the middle of the concrete jungle, the complete list features winning restaurants in 22 states. California comes out on top this year with 30 winning restaurants, followed by Florida with 26, and Hawaii with 10. Other notable states for outdoor dining include Arizona with eight winning restaurants and Maryland, Pennsylvania, and South Carolina each with three. Connecticut, Illinois, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Missouri, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Tennessee, and Washington, D.C. are also among the winners. While most of this year’s honorees serve American fare, other cuisines proved popular for outdoor dining, particularly seafood, French, and Italian. “From picturesque restaurants with shaded terraces to vibrant rooftops and sidewalk cafés, this year’s list showcases the spots that take the al fresco experience to the next level,” said Caroline Potter, OpenTable's chief dining officer. "These restaurants offer friendly service and the ideal ambiance for diners looking to enjoy the warm weather and soak up the best sights of summer. The 100 Best Al Fresco Restaurants in America list is generated solely from more than 12 million verified OpenTable diner reviews for more than 27,000 restaurants in all 50 states and Washington, D.C. collected between May 1, 2017 and April 30, 2018. All restaurants with a minimum "overall" score and number of qualifying reviews were included for consideration. Qualifying restaurants were then scored and sorted according to the percentage of reviews for which "outdoor dining" was selected as a special feature. Based on this methodology, the restaurants, listed in alphabetical order, comprise the 100 Best Al Fresco Restaurants in America for 2018 according to OpenTable diners. The complete list may also be viewed at opentable.com/lists/us-best-outdoor-restaurants-2018. Salk scientist studying infectious diseases and microbiome receives $250,000 prize Salk associate professor Janelle Ayres has been named one of three winners of the Blavatnik National Awards for Young Scientists, one of the world's largest unrestricted prizes for early career scientists. Ayres, the laureate in the life sciences category, will receive $250,000 for her pioneering research in physiology. Ayres’ work is revolutionizing our understanding of host-pathogen interactions and has the potential to solve one of the greatest current public health threats. : anti-microbial resistance. "Janelle is one of the most original thinkers in the field of infectious disease research," says Salk President Rusty Gage. "Her pioneering work on microbes has the potential to change human health in fundamental ways. We are elated the Blavatnik Foundation has recognized Janelle's past accomplishments and future promise with this prestigious award." As a member of Salk’s NOMIS Center for Immunobiology and Microbial Pathogenesis, Ayres works at the intersection of immunology, metabolism and microbiology, studying how our bodies stay healthy during infections. She takes an innovative approach grounded in mathematical and evolutionary predictions to understand how bacteria have evolved ways to promote our health. She uses these discoveries to develop new therapies for treating diseases. Ayres’ groundbreaking research on host-pathogen interactions is redefining our definition of health. In pivotal work, she discovered that microbes have evolved mechanisms to promote the health of the host to support their own survival, revealing a beneficial role for microbes in the maintenance of host health. Her revelation of an entirely new set of defense mechanisms likely will lead to novel therapies that bacteria won’t be able to evolve resistance to (unlike antibiotics). Ultimately, by leveraging those damage-control mechanisms, Ayres aims to develop effective treatments for infectious and noninfectious diseases, such as pathologies associated with cancer and aging. Ayres, who is also Helen McLoraine Developmental Chair at Salk, was selected as one of 31 finalists from among 286 outstanding faculty-rank researchers age 42 or younger nominated by 146 institutions across 42 states. She is one of three Blavatnik national laureates—one each in the categories of life sciences, chemistry, and physical sciences and engineering. The 2018 Blavatnik national laureates and finalists will be honored at an award ceremony on Monday, September 24, 2018, at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City. The Blavatnik Awards, established by the Blavatnik Family Foundation in the United States in 2007 and administered by the New York Academy of Sciences, began by identifying outstanding scientific talent in New York, New Jersey and Connecticut. The Blavatnik National Awards were inaugurated in 2014 and, in 2018, the awards were expanded to include young scientists in the United Kingdom and Israel. By the close of 2018, the Blavatnik Awards will have conferred prizes totaling $6.6 million, honoring 271 outstanding young scientists and engineers.
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    Mayor creates a stir with his short-term vacation rentals plan
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Jun 28, 2018 | 17141 views | 3 3 comments | 10 10 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Signs like this one on Crown Point Drive are in neighborhoods around Pacific Beach.     THOMAS MELVILLE / BEACH & BAY PRESS
    Signs like this one on Crown Point Drive are in neighborhoods around Pacific Beach. THOMAS MELVILLE / BEACH & BAY PRESS
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    Mayor Kevin Faulconer’s much-anticipated new regulations on short-term vacation rentals, seeking to strike a balance between those who want them out, and the Airbnb industry promoting them, was greeted by both strong support – and vehement disapproval. “What is being lauded as a compromise is in fact a concession to the short-term vacation rental industry,” said Joe LaCava, former chair of the Community Planners Committee, which oversees the City’s more than 40 citizen advisory groups making land-use recommendations. “Despite more pressing problems facing our City, the extraordinary city resources proposed to justify these incompatible uses prioritizes short-term vacation rentals over the real needs of San Diegans and our neighborhoods,” LaCava said. John Thickstun, a spokesperson for Save San Diego Neighborhoods, a single-family neighborhood group formed to lobby for more restrictive short-term rentals, had a list of questions for the mayor to answer about short-term rentals. Among them: What are the definitions of “primary” and “secondary” residences? Will rentals be limited to property titleholders? Does the proposed ordinance prohibit an individual from purchasing any number of residential dwellings and having others hold title and use the residences as short-term vacation rentals? Are short-term vacation rentals to be limited to “living breathing human beings” as opposed to trusts, associations, corporations?  Philip Minardi of the Expedia Group, the parent company of vacation rental platforms HomeAway.com and VRBO.com, had a different take. “For generations, whole-home vacation rentals have played an important role for San Diego homeowners and for families visiting the City,” said Minardi. “We applaud Mayor Faulconer and City staff on their efforts to craft a fair and effective policy that addresses community concerns and recognizes San Diego’s vibrant vacation rental community. We look forward to reviewing the proposal when it is released in full and welcome continued collaboration with all local stakeholders,” Minardi said. Faulconer characterized his new proposal as seeking to “strike a balance between growing the home-sharing industry, enforcement and neighborhood quality of life.”  The mayor’s proposal would: - Create the City’s first license-based system to manage short-term rentals. - Charge cost-recoverable fees to administer licenses and enforce code violations. - Establish a “Good Neighbor” policy to preserve neighborhood quality of life. - Hire additional staff to respond to complaints about nuisance properties. - Implement a per-night fee that would generate an estimated $3 million annually for affordable-housing projects.  “This is a balanced approach that establishes clear rules of the road for short-term rental hosts and guests while protecting neighborhood quality of life through increased oversight and enforcement,” Faulconer said. “This is a fair compromise that allows the home-sharing economy and our neighborhoods to co-exist and gives everyone clarity moving forward. I look forward to working with the City Council on passing these proposed regulations.” Monday, July 16 is the date during which the full City Council will take on Faulconer’s short-term vacation proposal. Is the mayor’s proposal a compromise or a sell out to the rental industry? Depending on who you speak to, Mayor Kevin Faulconer’s short-term vacation rental proposal is either an impartial workable compromise – or dead on arrival. “It’s not a compromise at all,” claimed John Thickstun, spokesperson for Save San Diego Neighborhoods, a grassroots group lobbying for tighter short-term rental controls. “Mayor Faulconer’s proposed ordinance is not only ill-conceived and unenforceable, it is also unlawful.” “The mayor’s draft ordinance is a fair and balanced compromise, which protects a homeowner’s property rights, San Diego’s thriving tourism economy and the right for neighbors to not be negatively impacted,” countered Jonah Mechanic of SeaBreeze Vacation Rentals in La Jolla. “The current code is outdated, ambiguous, and confusing.” Under Faulconer’s proposal, a maximum of two licenses can be issued to a host: one for their primary residence and one additional license for a secondary residence. The primary residence could be rented out for up to six months per year, with the secondary residence available for year-round rental. Proposed new short-term rental regulations would require a three-night minimum stay for coastal and downtown communities. Units with five or more bedrooms will first be required to obtain a Neighborhood Use Permit from the Development Services Department. Rental owners would also need to register with the City and pay an annual $949 fee, per-year, per rental. Monies collected would be used for enforcement of the rental ordinance. Asked what would be acceptable to coastal residents in a compromise, Thickstun replied: “The bottom line is that short-term rental are a transient use in the City’s municipal code. Transient uses do not belong in residential zones. What you’re talking about is changing the municipal code to allow these transient uses in every residential zone in San Diego. What [Faulconer’s] doing is really putting one over on San Diegans.” Thickstun argued short-term rentals take away from the existing housing stock. He pointed out San Diego is presently in the throes of an affordable housing crisis. “Our housing stock is for people who live in this community,” he said.  Crunching the numbers, Thickstun noted the Airbnb industry estimates there are 11,000 to 15,000 short-term vacation rentals in the city of San Diego. “If this is true, that means the majority of these [owners] have short-term vacation rentals. And half of these people don’t live in the City of San Diego,” Thickstun said. “There’s no legal distinction between primary and secondary residences in the mayor’s proposal. That leaves the door open for entities outside the city of San Diego to own secondary residences.” Defending the mayor’s proposal, Mechanic noted, “As is the case with most compromises, neither side gets everything they want.” But this is a fair and balanced answer to a very complicated issue.” Mechanic said: “The cap of only two permits per- person eliminates the risk of neighborhoods being over- run by short-term rentals, while still embracing the sharing economy throughout our city. Most importantly, the mayor’s ordinance raises millions of dollars that will go toward supporting enforcement of noise and nuisances.” Mechanic added: “We all agree that no one should have to live next to a ‘party house,’ and we welcome additional enforcement efforts to remove party houses and bad actors from the sharing economy here in San Diego. The short-term vacation rentals cap prevents the potential for investor to come in and buy properties and turn them into short-term rentals. It’s a win-win.”  If passed by the City Council on July 16, Faulconer’s ordinance would not go into effect until Jan. 1, 2020. 
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    Michael Flannery
    |
    June 29, 2018
    A similar version of this ordinance went into effect 14 months ago in Palm Springs, CA. Since then short term rental complaint calls have been cut in half despite the hotline number being heavily advertised after the ordinance passed. The 50 bad operator list has been cut down to a handful and shrinking. The calls to the police are down more than 90%. Due to the regulations, fees which represent barriers to those who do not want to play by these rules, the number of short term rentals is down by 10% and falling. This compromise in the great city of San Diego will be effective as long as enforcement is done right.
    Jimmy L
    |
    July 01, 2018
    The city is incapable of enforcing the municipal code. The city already doesn't respond to noise complaints or quality of life concerns and in the rare occasion that they do show up nothing is done. It's funny that one of the most criticized operators of STVR's is in support of the proposal as I am sure he believes that the city wont enforce anything that is passed and it will be great for his commercial enterprise.
    anonymous
    |
    July 01, 2018
    The sharing economy and opening up homes to travelers has been around for hundreds of years. Limiting licenses will prevent real estate investors from buying dozens of properties and turning them into short-term rentals. This will solve the concerns of people that believe this is 'ruining neighborhoods'. Short term rentals are helping many people keep their homes and afford to pay rent. These people are quiet and respectful of their neighborhoods. I applaud the mayor for taking steps to protect both sides. The city will gain at least 3 million dollars to help with affordable housing. Let's hope they take serious action and help to get the homeless off the streets and subsidize affordable housing with this additional income. We can all appreciate that this should help a very serious problem affecting San Diego.

    La Jolla community briefs
    Jun 18, 2018 | 26216 views | 1 1 comments | 15 15 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    La Jolla High School students move the tassels on their caps at the June 13 commencement ceremony.                                              BLAKE BUNCH/VILLAGE NEWS
    La Jolla High School students move the tassels on their caps at the June 13 commencement ceremony. BLAKE BUNCH/VILLAGE NEWS
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    Longtime La Jolla resident inducted into the California Baseball Coaches Association Hall of Honorees  The California Baseball Coaches Association (CBCA) names longtime local high school baseball coach, David Glassey, as one of its Hall of Honorees recipients this year. A ceremony will be held on Saturday, June 16 at 5 p.m. at the University of California, San Diego baseball stadium during the annual North South Series. For nearly 40 years, Glassey has coached high school baseball at Francis Parker School in San Diego, winning several California Interscholastic Federation (CIF) championships, as well as sending many of his players to play at the collegiate level and professionally. “I enjoy the challenge that comes with coaching and watching the players come together as a team. It has been rewarding to see them mature and become successful adults,” said Glassey. “Coaching gives me the opportunity to help them learn how to deal with failure. Baseball is a game of failure; you fail more than you succeed. I love seeing the dedication of players and seeing them learn many of life's lessons.”  Dedicated to his coaching craft, Glassey has a career record of 612 wins, one of the top five San Diego County high school baseball coaches with the most wins. He has won nine CIF championships and CIF runner up seven times throughout his career. Some of his recent players who went on to professional baseball careers include Nick Allen who was drafted by the Oakland A’s in 2017, as well as Nick Noonan and Jose Vizcaino for the San Francisco Giants, and Kyle Dowdy for the Detroit Tigers. Along with these players, many others have gone to play at the college level. With all of his success, the San Diego native will retire in 2018 as the varsity baseball coach at Francis Parker School, where the team finished 22-10 and played CIF’s Division 2 Championship. “It's been fun to see the successes my players had not only in baseball, but also in their lives and careers. I hope that in some way, I have influenced their success,” said Glassey. Here are some of what Glassey’s former students say about him: “Congrats, Coach! You deserve it. Your guidance and friendship changed lives, mine for sure. The best coach and actually the only person who will always be ‘coach’ on and off the field,” said Jeff Hiekkola. “He has made a difference in a lot of lives, including mine. I wouldn’t be who I am today,” said Ben Coughlan, a San Diego trial attorney and partner with The Gomez Firm. “What makes Coach great is the impact he’s had on the lives of so many young men and women, and the role model he has been and continues to be,” said Patrick Styles. “An honor and privilege to play for and coach with. Forever grateful,” said Greg LaBarre.  “I think all Parker players throughout the years can vouch that Coach Glassey is one of the best high school coaches in San Diego history,” said Pat McQuinn.  In addition to Glassey, Charles Hatfield of Chatsworth High School will also be inducted into CBCA’s 2018 Hall of Honorees. Other notable San Diego County honorees over the last three decades include David Gonzalez with Eastlake High School, Rob Phillips with Grossmont High School, Steve Vickery with El Capitan High School, Manny Hermosillo with Montgomery High School, and Dennis Pugh with Mission Bay High School. For more information about the North South Series and the 2018 induction ceremony, visit www.calcba.com. The Bishop’s School appoints Ron Kim as 12th head of school The Bishop’s School board of trustees and the school’s head of school search committee recently announced the appointment of Ron Kim as Bishop’s next head of school. Following a highly competitive national search process, Kim was selected to begin his term as Bishop’s 12th head of school in summer 2019, the start of the School’s 111th year. Kim brings a wealth of experience in school leadership, student-centered pedagogy and inclusive education principles. He is currently the head of school at Basis Independent McLean (BIM), a preschool—12th grade school in McLean, Va. Prior to BIM, Mr. Kim spent 23 years at Phillips Exeter Academy in Exeter, New Hampshire, where he held various administrative and teaching roles during his distinguished career; the most recent were assistant principal, dean of faculty, history instructor and girls’ varsity basketball coach. He was the youngest dean of faculty ever appointed at Exeter. Mr. Kim grew up in Southern California and earned a bachelor’s degree in history from the University of California, Berkeley, and a master’s degree in history from the University of Chicago.  Chair of the Bishop’s head of school search committee Barbara Edwards says, “Kim’s passion for education guided by values, ethics and inclusive principles, and the impact that arts and athletics can have on students at a formative point in their lives speak directly to the mission of The Bishop’s School.”  “Students will be successful in the future, in part because of their academic achievements and intellectual resources, but also because of their ability to collaborate, to connect with people who are different from themselves and to be devoted to the well-being of others,” Kim said. “The most meaningful educational experience provides students with the opportunity in class, on the fields or on a stage to succeed, fail, bounce back and know that, as a supportive community, we will go farther together than we would alone.”  Bishop’s board president Annette Bradbury adds, “Kim’s warmth and ease were apparent from the moment he set foot on campus, and his authenticity and humor resonated with administrators, alumni, faculty, staff, parents, students and trustees.” As was announced in November 2017, current Bishop’s head of middle school Carol Barry will serve as interim head of school for the 2018-2019 school year, and Mr. Kim will join Bishop’s in summer 2019. Barnard Elementary hosts first ‘International Food and Culture Night’ Barnard Mandarin Magnet Elementary School held its first “International Night” on June 1, which filled the school’s auditorium with students and their families eager to taste culinary delights from more than twenty countries, including Poland, England, Greece, Germany, Mexico, Philippines, Russia, Ireland, and, of course, China. There were also cultural performances on the stage. Highlights included Russian and Flamenco dancing, tae kwon do, and a folk song about the Hebrew alphabet. Many attendees wore their family’s national dress. For some, this meant wearing clothing that showcased more than one culture, hinting at the diversity found within the families themselves. “People may assume that our school’s culture is predominantly Chinese because of the nature of our immersion program,” said parent Love Zubiller. “But it’s not. Barnard is a school with so much diversity. Our ‘International Night’ is one way that we can showcase and celebrate the many cultures and rich diversity of our amazing community.” While attendees had their fill of kimchee, arroz con leche, and matzoh ball soup, it only left them hungry for more. Planning for next year’s “International Night” has begun, and the excitement –and aroma of Russian pryaniki gingerbread—is already filling the air. For information on Barnard Mandarin Magnet Elementary School, or to find out about the District’s School Choice program, visit sandiegounified.org/barnard. 'Echoing Light,' Astrid Preston works at new R.B. Stevenson Gallery locale The R.B. Stevenson Gallery recently announced the exhibition "Echoing Light" by Los Angeles artist Astrid Preston at their new main level space at 7661 Girard Ave. The opening reception for the Artist will be held on Saturday, June 16 from 5 to 8 pm. This exhibition is the second solo presentation of Preston's work at R.B. Stevenson Gallery. An illustrated catalog will accompany the show with an essay by Robert L. Pincus. "These paintings – and their titles – coax us into paying attention – not only to the paintings, which richly reward such scrutiny, but also to the details of the world at large," Pincus writes. "Preston assembles the elements of her paintings into a poetic whole; the image is permeated by a perception of how beauty, physical and perhaps metaphysical, which manifests itself in gardens, assumes an even more inspiring form in Preston’s new paintings." INFO: Where: 7661 Girard Ave. When: Tuesday through Saturday 10:30 a.m. to 5:00 pm. Contact: 858-459-3917 www.rbstevensongallery.com.
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    julie@sdnews.com
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    June 19, 2018
    Congrats to the class of 2018!
    La Jolla news and community briefs
    Jun 03, 2018 | 39374 views | 0 0 comments | 20 20 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    San Diego’s least-kept secret: a warm pre-summer sunset lights up La Jolla Shores. DON BALCH/VILLAGE NEWS
    San Diego’s least-kept secret: a warm pre-summer sunset lights up La Jolla Shores. DON BALCH/VILLAGE NEWS
    slideshow
    Promises2Kids’ 10th annual Dream On Concert On Monday, June 11, Promises2Kids, one of San Diego’s foremost nonprofits, with a focus on foster care and children’s welfare, will celebrate the 10th anniversary of its Dream On Concert Gala, presented by Kevin and Raegan Prior.  This beautiful event takes place under the stars and is attended by more than 600 philanthropists, community, and business leaders dedicated to creating a brighter future for foster children.   For the 10th year, Joan Waitt will host this special event at her beautiful La Jolla estate home. The event begins with a VIP reception at 5:30 p.m., followed by dinner, a live auction and a private concert by Rob Thomas. For ticket information, email Tegan@Promises2Kids.org or 858-751-6623. or visit www.promises2kids.org.  UC San Diego Baseball knocked out of series The 22nd-ranked University of California San Diego dug itself an early hole that it nearly battled out of, but fell to No. 23 Southern New Hampshire University, 7-4, in an NCAA Division II Championship elimination game Wednesday night at the USA Baseball National Training Complex. The eight-team, eight-day, double-elimination tournament is being co-hosted by the University of Mount Olive and the Town of Cary, North Carolina, back in Cary after a one-year move last season to Grand Prairie, Texas. Third-seeded UC San Diego ended another tremendous campaign as repeat West Region champion, at 43-17 overall. Fourth-seeded Southern New Hampshire, the East Region champion out of Manchester, N.H., improved to 41-16. The Penmen face elimination again on Thursday, May 31, against fifth-seeded Augustana. UC San Diego trailed 7-0 after the first three frames, but scored in three straight innings from the fifth through the seventh, to make a game of it again. All the while, senior closer Cameron Kurz (Encinitas/La Costa Canyon HS) kept the Tritons in contention with a career-long 4.2 shutout innings of relief. He faced the minimum 14 batters over that stretch, with no hits or walks allowed, and six strikeouts. The Tritons went down in order in their opening half for the second straight night, before Tom Blandini golfed a leadoff home run for the Penmen, his second on the year and the first to right field of the tournament. Junior first baseman Tyler Durna got over and dove to his right to corral Dakota Mulcay's ground ball, got up and flipped to starting pitcher Jack Rupe, Jr. (San Marcos/Mission Hills HS), for the third out. Durna doubled through the right side with one gone in the second, but like Tuesday night, UC San Diego could not get him around, a strikeout and fly out ending the frame. Back-to-back one-out singles had the Penmen threatening for more in their second, and a three-run blast down the left field line by junior shortstop Kyle Pangallo, also his second of the year, made it a 4-0 deficit early.  La Jolla Veterinary Hospital to host 5th annual ‘Paws & Pints La Jolla’ fundraiser  At 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, June 7, The Lot will host the fifth annual “Paws & Pints La Jolla” fundraisers. All of the event’s proceeds go to The Rancho Coastal Humane Society and The FACE Foundation. “This event is in our community, for the community, and it has evolved into something La Jolla looks forward to year after year,” said event founder Stephanie Coolidge of La Jolla Veterinary Hospital. The fundraiser features a live auction, silent auction and raffle with items such as VIP Padres tickets, surfboards, art from local La Jolla artists, countless La Jolla restaurant, and hotel, winery, museum and brewery packages. Local La Jolla merchants donate jewelry, museum pieces, high-end apparel and gift card packages second to none. There will be a  "Wine Grab" featured at the event and a photo contest for you and your four-legged friend on the red carpet. The Rancho Coastal Humane Society is responsible for finding homes for thousands of animals all around San Diego County. The FACE Foundation is a non-profit that provides financial assistance for San Diego animal owners who are unable to afford the cost of their pet’s life-saving emergency veterinary care. F.O.C.A.S. stands for “Friends of County Animal Shelters” and was started in La Jolla by La Jolla residents Peggy Howell and Sue Geller in 1982. The program is now managed by Rancho Coastal Humane Society. Join La Jolla Veterinary Hospital in making a huge impact on the animal-welfare community right here in the Village. To RSVP, visit pawsandpints.com. St. Germaine Children’s Charity to announce 2018 Grant Recipients at Luncheon. The St. Germaine Children’s Charity Grant Recipients will be announced on June 6 during the charity’s annual luncheon held at The La Jolla Country Club. St. Germaine Children’s Charity is proud to announce the grant monies awarded for this year will total over $149,000. Also announced at the luncheon will be the 2018 Barbara Christensen Heart of San Diego Award winner. This award is named in honor of St. Germaine Children’s Charity founder, Barbara Christensen, and is awarded each year to a qualified nonprofit organization that upholds her vision that all children will be loved, cherished and free from harm. The recipient exemplifies the mission of St. Germaine and has a proven track record of excellence in serving children. The installation of the 2018 board will take place at the luncheon as well. Friends from the press and media are invited to the luncheon as guests of St. Germaine Children’s Charity. St. Germaine Children’s Charity is a California nonprofit corporation founded in 1984 and is committed to preventing child abuse and improving the lives of abused and neglected children in San Diego. To date, St. Germaine has donated over $4.5M in monies and an estimated $1.7M of in-kind donations to the San Diego community. For more information, contact Julie O’Brien at julie@juliemary.com.
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