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    Go Skateboarding Day is June 21 – New book recounts the birth of skate in San Diego
    by LUCIA VITI
    Jun 16, 2019 | 2176 views | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Dave Dominey surf style, Escondido Reservoir. © Lance Smith/Tracker Archive.
    Dave Dominey surf style, Escondido Reservoir. © Lance Smith/Tracker Archive.
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    John O’Malley, Central Arizona Water Project. / Photo by Warren Bolster
    John O’Malley, Central Arizona Water Project. / Photo by Warren Bolster
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    Did you ever wonder what catapulted skateboarding’s popularity into the stratosphere? Does history of a “sport,” born and bred along the coast of Southern California, coincide with your love of surfing? Are you “stoked” to know that skateboarding will be featured in Tokyo for the 2020 Summer Olympics? If you’ve answered yes to any of the above questions, John O’Malley’s new book, “Urethane Revolution: The Birth of Skate-San Diego 1975,” is a must read. The always interesting, sometimes shocking, off-color page-turner dialogues the history of the skateboarding from one of its founding fathers, John O’Malley. Dubbed the “greatest story never told in extreme sports history,” O’Malley retraces his steps as a member of the original Skunkworks crew to creating his own skateparks. Photographs – sure to make everyone reminisce about the good ole’ days – accompany stories from the underground. “One crazy year on the California coast in 1975 a hippie skunkworks, bred in garages and shacks, launched the modern skater movement,” writes O’Malley. Strap in for a wild ride replete with two car chases, two plane crashes, a massive truck bomb, Colombian Narcos, the Mafia, senior White House staff, a gypsy fortuneteller, three straight-up miracles, Jacques Cousteau, big piles of cocaine and naked hippie chicks.” O’Malley details the books title, “Urethane Revolution” beginning with the history behind the urethane. “Around 1973, a guy named Frank Nasworthy discovered these urethane training wheels that were used on beginners’ roller skates,” he notes. “They were grippier than the unforgiving composite clay wheels of the day. Frank bolted them on his skateboard and bingo! Suction-cup traction like no one had ever imagined possible. It’s in that instant that the skateboard went from a toy with feet of clay to a wall-climbing UFO, screaming at warp speed to the 2020 Olympics.” The Revolution follows suit. “The Revolution began when a rift opened in the universe and that centrifugal buzz – heretofore available only through sports like surfing and skiing – came leaking out of the streets,” writes O’Malley. “Adrenaline rushing up your road, serotonin dripping down the drive. And the scales fell from our eyes: Any paved surface could be ridden. And the call went out: The rift has opened, God is great, spread the word.” According to O’Malley, a perfect storm of “ill winds” that began with a historic drought fueled the Revolution. “The drought uncovered insanely fun new skating forms like the reservoirs and drainage ditches while recession-vacant homes had their swimming pools drained and skated,” he pens. “Our eyes spoked an urban landscape lit up with a million new possibilities.” “Urethane Revolution” also showcases La Jolla native Bobby Turner. The innovative craftsman built Turner Summer/Ski slalom skateboards. Still popular today, these boards are constructed along the design vein of surfboards and snow skis. According to O’Malley, Turner’s skateboards “revolutionized” slalom skating boards. O’Malley touts, “The Revolution is over. Skaters won.” And if you need a place to play, check out Robb Field; San Diego’s first skateboard park constructed and operated by the City. Designed with input from the legendary Tony Hawk, the 40,000 square foot concrete park is suitable for all ages and skill levels. Sidling the San Diego River Bike Path at the onset of Ocean Beach, the “street course” features a combination bowl, handrails, ledges, blocks, a pump bump and an octagon volcano. Location: 2525 Bacon St.
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    WAVES OF BLUE – Bioluminescence glow returns along San Diego beaches
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Jun 14, 2019 | 13619 views | 2 2 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    The bioluminescent algae bloom was captured along the shores of Ocean Beach. / CHRIS MANNERINO PHOTO
    The bioluminescent algae bloom was captured along the shores of Ocean Beach. / CHRIS MANNERINO PHOTO
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    The crimson tide is back. Not Alabama’s football team, but the bioluminescent glow from the marine phenomenon known as the red tide. “It’s intermittent and impossible to predict,” said Scripps Institution of Oceanography scientist and bioluminescence expert Michael Latz, of the recurring phenomenon. Red tides are caused by aggregations of dinoflagellates (marine plankton) including Ceratium falcatiforme and Lingulodinium polyedra. The latter is known for its bioluminescent displays, with waves or water movement causing the phytoplankton to glow neon blue at night. Pictures posted recently on social media showed the eerie neon glow. According to several San Diego photographers who captured the effect, the bioluminescent algae bloom was captured along the shores from Torrey Pines State Beach to Ocean Beach. The range of red tides also varies greatly. There was a really big one in October 2011 that extended up the entire Southern California coast from the Mexican border to Los Angeles. “It’s usually every couple years, but sometimes it happens in sequential years,” said Latz of the red tide, noting there was a massive one along the San Diego coast in 1995, with a follow-up the next year. It’s happening again, as there was a red tide in 2018, and now another one this year, both starting near the end of May. The Scripps scientist said the tide’s plankton go through developmental stages, much like the lifecycle of some insects. “The organisms that produce this tide have a dormant life state called a cyst, that can sink down into the sediment and emerge later,” Latz said. “Local red tides maybe have an internal clock, and a year later they emerge into swimming cells. On a calm sunny day, they’re (plankton) attracted to the sunlight and they swim right up to the surface. If the water is strong enough to stimulate them, they’ll  produce bioluminescence.” “It is of great scientific interest why that is occurring,” said Latz of the tidal algae blooms. “For me, the bioluminescence is really the spectacular part.” Latz added scientists have successfully grown red tide plankton. “We just grow them for our research in labs so we can study them even when they’re not abundant on the coast here,” he said. Scripps scientists continue to sample red tides when they occur to learn more about the genetic and metabolic characteristics of the organisms. The waves propagate onshore, and their circulation patterns create dense accumulations of the red-tide organisms over the troughs of the waves. As you look out over the ocean, you'll see that the red tide typically appears in stripes parallel to shores. These are the internal wave troughs. Bioluminescent displays are viewed best from a dark beach at least two hours after sunset, though visibility is not guaranteed.  What’s also mysterious is the timing and duration of red tides, which have lasted anywhere from one week to a month or more.  Latz said red tides can, but rarely do, contain a chemical neurotoxin that can be harmful to man and other mammals. “Some people who’ve gone out in the surf with them have had dizziness or asthma-like conditions,” he said. “It’s something we are interested in studying.” There has also been a pronounced seasonality to red tides. “Historically, they used to happen in early fall,” said Latz. “Then that shifted in the ’90s so that it also occurs in spring. Spring and fall are the times when it happens the most.”
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    La Jolla teen surfer returns to the water after brain injury
    by EMILY BLACKWOOD
    Jun 12, 2019 | 9083 views | 0 0 comments | 9 9 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Local photographer Lee Bertrand photographed 16-year-old surfer Mick Davey after he returned to the water following a brain injury. 'Everyone loves a comeback story,' he said, 'and he deserves all this for sure.' /  Photo by Lee Bertrand. 
    Local photographer Lee Bertrand photographed 16-year-old surfer Mick Davey after he returned to the water following a brain injury. 'Everyone loves a comeback story,' he said, 'and he deserves all this for sure.' / Photo by Lee Bertrand. 
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    Mick Davey is no stranger to the water. 
     
    The youngest of four, it was a family rite of passage for the La Jolla 16-year-old to learn how to surf with his dad, Chuck Davey, when he was only 4 years old.
     
    “We grew up on the beach,” Chuck Davey said. “We were at the beach every day.”
     
    Throughout his young life, Mick Davey has been fortunate enough to surf internationally in Fiji, Australia, Tahiti, and Barbados. He joined the surf team in middle school  — and has since continued to compete for La Jolla High School — after he told his dad he wanted to stop playing soccer. Since it’s a requirement that all the Davey kids participate in a sport, Chuck Davey told his son he had to do competitive surfing — which was fine by him. 
     
    “I have more fun surfing and I like being in the water,” he said. 
     
    A promising figure on the surf team, Mick Davey caught the eye of Lee Bertrand, a water and surf photographer. They met after Bertrand saw him surfing alongside big names like Damian Hopgood and Josh Kerr. 
     
    “He was this 14-year-old kid charging with these pros,” Bertrand recalled. “I felt like he was on a good path of surfing, really humble and cool kid. Then he got that gnarly injury.”
     
    While surfing at Windansea Beach on April 18, 2018, Mick Davey hit his head on the nose of his surfboard, lodging an inch of the board's fiberglass into his brain. He felt something sticking out of his head and quickly swam to shore. 
     
    Luckily Chuck Davey, who had been a lifeguard for 36 years, was there and knew exactly what to do. 
     
    “It was pretty hectic but the key is to stay calm,” Chuck Davey said. “Anytime there’s something sticking out, you never pull it out. If we would have pulled it out, he would have died because it severed a main vein in his brain.”
     
    Bertrand agrees. 
     
    "His dad being a local lifeguard probably has a lot to do with why he’s still alive," he said. 
     
    Medics quickly arrived on the scene and transported Mick Davey to the hospital. According to Chuck Davey, his son's injury kind of “freaked out” the E.R. doctors. 
     
    “They made a call to the neurosurgeon right away," Chuck Davey said. "They couldn’t even fit him in to do a CAT scan because of the fiberglass.”
     
    For four hours, surgeons worked to carefully remove the remnants of the surfboard, seaweed, and seawater from the teen's brain, and three titanium plates were put in his skill to hold the severed vein. The experience was hard on the entire Davey family, especially his dad.
     
    “He wasn’t out of the woods for probably a month,” Chuck Davey said. “Your whole world kind of stops.”
     
    “I don't know; I was pretty stoked to get out of school for a month,” Mick Davey joked with his dad.
     
    Miraculously, he suffered no loss of memory, vision or brain function. And while the doctors said they didn’t want him surfing for six to eight months, Mick Davey started getting back in the water after three — with one modification.
     
    “He had the idea, 'Well, what if I got a helmet?’” Chuck Davey said. A family friend loaned them a Gath surf helmet, which made him feel more comfortable with his comeback. 
     
    "When it first happened and I was in the hospital, I looked at my dad and was like ‘I don’t think I want to surf anymore,'" Mick Davey recalled. "Then in two weeks later, I was like ‘I wanna surf. The Gath helmet still makes me feel more confident."
     
    While getting back into competitions and continuing with the surf team are all apart of the grand plan, Mick Davey and his dad agree that he’s taking it easy this year. For now, it's about getting comfortable in the water again — which is easier with Gath is sponsoring him — and enjoying this life he's lucky to lead. 
     
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    San Diego International Airport’s Arts Program unveils Forces of Nature
    Jun 03, 2019 | 31658 views | 0 0 comments | 19 19 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    The spring performing arts residency group, San Diego Dance Theatre, based in Liberty Station, performs in front of travelers at the airport’s Sunset Cove. / Photos by Thomas Melville
    The spring performing arts residency group, San Diego Dance Theatre, based in Liberty Station, performs in front of travelers at the airport’s Sunset Cove. / Photos by Thomas Melville
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    The spring performing arts residency group, San Diego Dance Theatre, based in Liberty Station, performs in front of travelers at the airport’s Sunset Cove. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    The spring performing arts residency group, San Diego Dance Theatre, based in Liberty Station, performs in front of travelers at the airport’s Sunset Cove. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    slideshow
    San Diego International Airport’s Arts Program has launched this year’s collective experience for airport travelers and visitors. The Arts Program aims to infuse the airport with light, levity, comfort and enriching experiences. The program highlights the region’s rich cultural community through three components: temporary exhibitions, performing arts and public art. A new Arts Master Plan will carry these focus areas into the future with guidelines for the program’s continued innovation. “At the heart of our Arts Program is to deliver inviting experiences through creative, visually appealing and memorable artwork and programs,” said Kim Becker, president/CEO of the Airport Authority.  “Designed with the traveler in mind, we invite SAN users to pause, take a moment on their journey, and enjoy this uniquely San Diego experience.” Performing arts Now through June, the airport’s spring performing arts residency group, San Diego Dance Theatre, based in Liberty Station, is onsite creating, rehearsing and performing new routines in response to the airport environment. Dances, movement patterns, and music selection are influenced by the artworks in the airport’s public art collection as well as the history and geography of the San Diego region. Blindspot Collective, a San Diego-based theatre company devoted to immersive programming, was selected as the airport’s fall performing arts residency group. Beginning in July, the company will work collaboratively with the airport, local artists and community groups to develop short plays inspired by SAN and its visitors. Each play will be between 10-15 minutes, and performed in multiple locations throughout the airport. Temporary exhibitions Forces of Nature, the Airport Arts Program’s 2019 temporary exhibition is now on full display. The exhibition features artwork and collections that explore the complexity, fragility, and beauty of San Diego’s natural landscape. The yearlong airport-wide exhibition features distinct installations by 16 different artists and organizations. Exhibition highlights include: · Glittering mini universe sculptures created by Sasha Koozel Reibstein, in direct response to the brilliant and diverse landscapes of San Diego; · Immersive plant installations by botanical artist Britton Neubacher showcase the inherent artistry in nature, encouraging the viewer to look from the perspective of the natural world; · Suspended cardboard sharks painstakingly constructed from hundreds of precisely cut pieces of cardboard and flat reed individually fit and glued together by artist William Feeney. DesignAHEAD, a SAN Arts Program initiative launched in 2018 to engage the next generation of innovators, designers and artists, invites high school and college students to tackle real-world design challenges faced in the airport environment. Participating classes visit the airport for a public art and terminal tour, and take part in design charrettes related to a specific project. The students ultimately develop a project for an airport site that will enhance the experience of the traveling public.  The latest collaboration between the University of San Diego and SAN is now on display in Terminal 2 through the end of July. The program offered beginning and advanced painting students an opportunity to create original artwork in varied media inspired by the airport and broader San Diego region over the course of several months. The resulting pieces range from inventive representations of the inner workings of the airport to imagery depicting regional wildlife with special consideration toward how travelers use the terminal space. Public art  “Oh lovely desert, I worry about you,” by San Diego-based artist Adriene Hughes, is the latest work in the Admiral Boland Way mural series. Located on the north side of the airport campus, the temporary mural offers a dramatic, panoramic view of the Anza Borrego desert using infrared photography. The work illuminates the desert’s plant life in vivid pink hues, and also calls attention to the impact of prolonged drought on the region. The 144-feet long mural is composed of 45 separate photographs digitally stitched together to create a sprawling collage that references the tradition of landscape photography. The mural will be on display through February 2020. Airport Arts Master Plan Following a comprehensive effort spanning nearly two years, the Airport Authority Board approved a new Arts Master Plan for the airport on March 14. The Master Plan outlines recommendations for the future of the three core components of the Arts Program. It also recommends priorities for communications, customer and community engagement, and evaluation. Additionally, the plan focuses on possible artwork and programming infrastructure for upcoming capital projects at the airport, specifically the proposed Airport Development Plan (ADP). It also considers the role of the program beyond when there are no major capital projects on the horizon. The Arts Master Plan was developed through ongoing consultation with the Airport’s Arts Advisory Committee and many Airport Authority and ADP stakeholder groups. From the onset of the project, staff and the consultant team worked in collaboration with stakeholders to ensure alignment with SAN’s goals around customer experience and engagement with the broader community, as articulated in the Airport’s five-year Strategic Plan. The Master Plan project also required collaboration with external stakeholders, including representatives from visual and performing arts and educational organizations throughout the region.  The planning process involved extensive research and multiple phases, including interviews and roundtable meetings, intercept and online surveys, benchmarking and preliminary studies. All in all, more than 200 internal and external stakeholders were engaged, over 650 surveys were completed, and 18 airport and transit arts programs were benchmarked.  For more information about the Airport Arts Program, visit arts.san.org/.
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    Group seeks seal of approval for rope barrier at Children’s Pool
    Jun 02, 2019 | 1542 views | 1 1 comments | 6 6 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Aerial view of the Children’s Pool in La Jolla.      RYAN SHORT / VILLAGE NEWS
    Aerial view of the Children’s Pool in La Jolla. RYAN SHORT / VILLAGE NEWS
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    Seal advocates held a press conference recently at Children’s Pool to endorse 10-year renewal of the rope barrier – and seasonal closure of the beach – at the La Lolla landmark. It was no accident the conference took place on May 15. That was the last day of the Dec. 15 to May 15 annual closure of the pool, and institution of the rope barrier, to protect harbor seals during their pupping season. The California Coastal Commission is expected to vote during its June meeting in San Diego on whether to grant the City of San Diego’s application to allow a 10-year extension of the seasonal rope barrier separating humans from pinnipeds at the pool. Shared-use at Children’s Pool has been a contentious issue for more than a decade pitting animal rights advocates against beach-access proponents. The battle between the two sides has turned ugly at times. Seal advocates once used bullhorns to warn people away from seals. But such extreme conflicts have subsided in recent years. Adrian Kwiatkowski, spokesman for the Seal Conservancy, formerly La Jolla Friends of the Seals, said shared-use is working. “The pool has been closed for five months, and open the other seven, and the guideline rope has prevented conflicts between humans harassing seals, and people who are passionate about seals’ protection,” he said. “It has brought peace and calm to all involved. We don’t want to go back to what existed before.” Added Kwiatkowski: “We support the extension of the 10-year permit cycle. There’s lots of coastline for humans to have access to the ocean. This is the one spot where the seals haul out and give birth. The rope is legal. It is advisory. People don’t have to stand behind it.” “The seasonal beach closure has reduced seal harassment to zero during the pupping season while dramatically reducing police calls with no citations issued,” said Dr. Jane Reldan, president of the Seal Conservancy. The guideline rope has been successful in preventing human harassment of the harbor seal colony during the non-pupping-season months. “Without the rope, people can get too close to the seals. These permits are an elegant compromise which balance human coastal access and animal habitat protection while maintaining this unique and special coastal resource,” Reldan said. Arguing the City refused to do an environmental impact report for their last Children’s Pool beach closure permit application, Ken Hunrichs of Friends of Children’s Pool said: “The Coastal Commission should not renew these permits without imposing strict benchmarks for actually improving sand and water quality. The City must be required to repair and open the existing beach ramp for all visitors, especially those mobility impaired using wheelchairs. Any permit extension must only be for a limited term, and with defined improvement goals for any future renewal.”  Added Hunrichs: “The City’s closure plan has caused increased biological pathogen hazards from widespread animal waste on the sand, polluted water and a closed public beach. This failed five-year experiment is contradictory to the mandated uses set in law by the California State Tidelands Grant [Trust].”  The crescent-shaped, manmade pool was created in the 1930s by La Jolla philanthropist Ellen Browning Scripps specifically as a safe wading area for children. But the pool has since become a de facto seal rookery.  Pro-beach access advocates contend the rope barrier and periodic pool closure violates the intent of the trust governing the pool, which they say was intended to provide public access to recreational users in perpetuity. Seal supporters contend the barrier is needed to protect seal mothers and their pups from human harassment, with pups dying if they’re separated from their mothers.
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    John Leek
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    June 09, 2019
    That picture shows seals all over Children's Pool and a bunch more on adjacent S. Casa Beach where they have no protection at all. Does not bother them. They bring their pups there every winter and share that beach with people. So. Do we not have to close S. Casa Beach in the winter too? And how do we not close the Cove and adjacent sea lion rookeries?
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