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    New Plunge pool at Belmont Park to open July 4
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Jun 25, 2019 | 8658 views | 0 0 comments | 7 7 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    The new facility has the pool on the ground level, with state-of-the-art functional fitness equipment and free weights above on the second floor and roof deck.
    The new facility has the pool on the ground level, with state-of-the-art functional fitness equipment and free weights above on the second floor and roof deck.
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    After a nearly 2 1/2-year wait, the Plunge pool at Belmont Park will open to the public on July 4. The opening ceremony, which will take place on July 3, will include remarks from Mayor Kevin Faulconer, who also presided at the old historic pool’s demolition on Jan. 30, 2017. “We look forward to celebrating the highly anticipated re-opening of the Plunge at Belmont Park,” said Steve Thomas, general manager of Belmont Park. “Beginning July 4, the new Plunge at Belmont Park will officially open and provide an iconic place for local and visiting families to enjoy as it has for many generations before.” The re-imagined Plunge is being managed by Fit Athletic Club. The new facility has the pool on the ground level, with state-of-the-art functional fitness equipment and free weights above on the second floor and roof deck. Fit has said it will be a private, month-to-month membership club with no long-term contracts.  With a predominantly glass façade, the new Plunge has integrated exterior light with interior coastal textures. The new building features a glass retractable-roof system promoting natural air circulation and preventing some of the deterioration issues that previously plagued the old building from moisture and saltwater. Belmont Park and its iconic Plunge pool’s history date back to the 1920s and wealthy sugar magnate and early San Diego pioneer John D. Spreckels, who built Belmont Park. Originally known as The Natatorium, the Plunge’s 60-foot by 175-foot swimming pool was constructed as a centerpiece of the park, and was then the largest salt-water pool in the world holding 400,000 gallons of water.  In 1940, the salt water of the Plunge began to damage its filtration system and fresh water was brought in making it the largest indoor heated pool in Southern California at 12,000 square feet.
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    City Council approves lease extension for Campland to clean up De Anza mobile home park
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Jun 25, 2019 | 1151 views | 0 0 comments | 6 6 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Aerial view of the now-abandoned mobile home park at De Anza Cove.
    Aerial view of the now-abandoned mobile home park at De Anza Cove.
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    Environmentalists were not happy campers as the San Diego City Council voted 6-3 on June 24 to grant Campland on the Bay’s request for a five-year lease extension by the City to clean-up and do asbestos removal at the now-abandoned De Anza Cove mobile home park. Dissenting Council members were Council President Georgette Gomez of District 9, Council President Pro Tem Barbara Bry of District 1 and Vivian Moreno of District 8.  Jacob Gelfand of Campland characterized the short-term lease as a win-win for all stakeholders. He has claimed it will not prejudice the City’s ongoing De Anza Revitalization Plan, which seeks to reimagine, repurpose and revitalize the northeast corner of Mission Bay Park.  Environmentalists criticized Gelfand’s plan’s financing, while arguing the new short-term lease will further delay the long-awaited wetlands restoration for Rose Creek and the Kendall-Frost Marsh. Only about 5 percent of wetlands remain of Mission Bay’s original 4,000 acres. “This short-term proposal does not interfere with long-term plans for De Anza and would result in removal of hazardous materials and abandoned homes that poses a serious liability for the City,” said Gelfand. “Campland with its expertise can take over seamlessly in the short-term.” Gelfand’s short-term plan includes: a five-year lease to take over camping at De Anza RV; a 24-month timeframe to do asbestos abatement and remove abandoned mobile homes; re-opening the scenic coastal bike and pedestrian path around De Anza peninsula; adding 150 more RV campsites to the existing 260, as well as a shuttle between De Anza and Campland; and extending Campland’s lease. Environmentalists saw it differently. During lengthy testimony, one opponent labeled Campland’s lease proposal as “a nightmare addressed as a daydream.” Another, John Heatherington, characterized Campland’s plan as “serving a privileged few and creating a private beach.” “If you give anybody a lease, it should be a one-year lease,” argued Deborah Knight. Denise Friedman of Pacific Beach decried Campland’s proposal as “subsidizing a private enterprise at the expense of the public.” Chris Redfern of San Diego Audubon argued the lease proposal is not exempt from the California Environmental Quality Act, and that action on it should be postponed until further environmental analysis is completed. Council members weighed in on Gelfand’s plan. “There’s two conversations here, a short-term and a long-term conversation,” said District 2 Councilmember Dr. Jennifer Campbell. “We must find a balance. The short-term lease will not prevent, or delay, the long-term conversion to marshland. The abandoned De Anza mobile home park is full of material that can contaminate the environment, and that must be removed by state law. Campland has generously offered to do that.” Before casting her vote, Bry said, “I’m committed to a public process analyzing all the alternatives before we decide on long-term uses for this beautiful park.” “I’m torn a little,” admitted Gomez, before voting against the Gelfand plan. “We’ve been kicking the can down the road for many years. This lease is doing that again.”
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    Dr. Seuss ‘Lorax’ tree falls, possibly due to old age
    by EMILY BLACKWOOD
    Jun 24, 2019 | 11233 views | 0 0 comments | 12 12 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    The tree in Ellen Browning Scripps Park – long thought to have inspired Dr. Seuss to write ‘The Lorax’ – last winter.           DON BALCH / VILLAGE NEWS
    The tree in Ellen Browning Scripps Park – long thought to have inspired Dr. Seuss to write ‘The Lorax’ – last winter. DON BALCH / VILLAGE NEWS
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    The Lorax Tree fell down on June 13, taking a concrete bench down with it. Photo by Don Balch.
    The Lorax Tree fell down on June 13, taking a concrete bench down with it. Photo by Don Balch.
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    One of La Jolla’s most iconic trees has fallen. 
     
    The over 100-year-old Monterey Cypress that sat in Ellen Browning Scripps Park and was long believed to be the inspiration behind Dr. Seuss’ “The Lorax,” fell over on June 13. Tim Graham, the spokesman for the San Diego Parks and Recreation Department, said that the tree’s old age was likely the cause. 
     
    "While it's difficult to determine the exact cause, it is likely that the age of the tree was a major factor,” he said. "The tree, while not dead, was over 100 years old. Monterey Cypress tend to have a range between 40-140 years. Tree failures in older trees are not uncommon.” 
     
    While it’s been referred to as the “Lorax Tree” by many La Jollans for decades, it’s not clear if it really inspired Theodor Seuss Geisel to write the 1971 children’s book. According to Dr. Seuss Enterprises, what inspired the “Truffla trees” is still very much a mystery. 
     
    "We really have no idea if Ted based the Truffula trees on this particular tree,” said Susan Brandt, president of Dr. Seuss Enterprises. "But regardless we are saddened to hear that this beautiful tree has fallen down, as we are when any tree that has lived for decades falls.”
     
    A representative from UC San Diego — which has a long history with the Geisel family — also said that La Jolla’s “Lorax Tree” was only lore and that neither Theodore or Audrey Geisel designated it as such. 
     
    Still, the tree served as an important piece of the community for many of its residents. 
     
    “The much loved 'Lorax Tree' in Scripps Park toppled over on Thursday,” said Don Balch, who photographed the tree in its prime as well as when it fell. “It’s a sad loss for La Jollans.”
     
    While age definitely played a role in the tree’s fall, one resident wondered if the increasing popularity of the park did as well. 
     
    "The Cove Park used to be a park where nature was left undisturbed by cars, machines, and installation," said Mary Anne Brown. "Today’s economy has transformed the park into a commercial venue turning it into a parking lot for car shows, etc. Driving and heavy traffic on sacred ground with living specimens and sensitive root structure does not bode well for the life of the trees.”
     
    Graham said the sections of the tree that were removed from the park are currently being stored at a City facility. The plan is to find a way to repurpose the iconic tree’s wood, but nothing has been decided. 
     
    As for a new tree in its place, Graham said there have been discussions of planting another Monterey Cypress in that area but nothing has been finalized. 
     
    For the time being, it seems we’ll only be left to wonder if the tree at Ellen Browning Scripps Park really did inspire Dr. Seuess to write the following:
     
    "Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot, nothing is going to get better. It's not. I speak for the trees, for the trees have no tongues.” 
     
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    Tails and trails – City Council approves dog-friendly option for Fiesta Island
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Jun 17, 2019 | 26390 views | 0 0 comments | 27 27 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Friends and fidos at sunset on Fiesta Island. / Photo by Kathy Miller Gray
    Friends and fidos at sunset on Fiesta Island. / Photo by Kathy Miller Gray
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    Option B for Fiesta Island.
    Option B for Fiesta Island.
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    Audience members practically howled after San Diego City Council voted unanimously June 17 for the more dog-friendly of two options offered for redeveloping Fiesta Island. The Council joined four other previous governmental bodies in selecting dog friendlier Option B over Option A, which was espoused by the non-motorized boating community including kayakers and paddlers. Only the City Planning Commission chose Option A over Option B. Both options were proposed as an amendment to the Mission Bay Park Master Plan to update the land uses and vision for manmade, 470-acre, multi-use Fiesta Island. Option A would have divided the island with a road, which would have reduced access for off-leash dog users, in favor of providing storage and beach access for personal watercraft. Option B keeps the island intact and undivided, while increasing the fenced, off-leash area, which would have been bisected by a road if Option A had been chosen. City staffer Sarah Osborn told Council members both options being considered were meant to “preserve natural resources and improve both water access and road circulation.” She added both options also “formalized much of existing uses on the island.” Public testimony at the Council hearing was stacked heavily in favor of Option B advocated by the Fiesta Island Dog Owners group. Only two people testified in favor of non-motorized more boat-friendly Option A. Kathy Archibald of San Diego Outrigger Canoe Club noted members of the non-motorized boating community who “come in all shapes and sizes and from every demographic just want a place to get to the water.” Kathy Parrish of FIDO countered that Option B would benefit more island users. “Tens of thousands of people use this space free at Fiesta Island 365 days a year from dawn to dusk, rain or shine,” she said. “We don’t need more roads and fences. Don’t pave over paradise.” FIDO president Carolyn Chase read letters for Option B supporters from every City Council district. “This is the most affordable and sustainable plan for most users and most uses,” Chase concluded. Following public testimony, District 2 Councilmember Dr. Jennifer Campbell noted both options improved Fiesta Island, “especially the path and the bicycle area around the island making them safer. I’m a strong supporter of keeping Fiesta in its most natural form. I’d like to move certification of the environmental impact report, and amending the Mission Bay Master Plan to include Option B.” District 7 Councilmember Scott Sherman reiterated his stance that a non-motorized boat launch and area for personal watercraft would be a better fit at the existing South Shores Boat Launch, which he described as “incredibly underutilized.” District 8 Councilmember Vivian Moreno credited both sides for being passionate, producing photos of dogs that people favoring Option B had emailed her. “I’m the mother of one dog and I take her there to run on the sand and play in the surf and I understand why so many people go there,” she said. “I don’t see the need to destroy the experience of thousands of dogs and their families, and that’s why I’m supporting this motion.”
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    Go Skateboarding Day is June 21 – New book recounts the birth of skate in San Diego
    by LUCIA VITI
    Jun 16, 2019 | 19745 views | 4 4 comments | 28 28 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Dave Dominey surf style, Escondido Reservoir. © Lance Smith/Tracker Archive.
    Dave Dominey surf style, Escondido Reservoir. © Lance Smith/Tracker Archive.
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    John O’Malley, Central Arizona Water Project. / Photo by Warren Bolster
    John O’Malley, Central Arizona Water Project. / Photo by Warren Bolster
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    Did you ever wonder what catapulted skateboarding’s popularity into the stratosphere? Does history of a “sport,” born and bred along the coast of Southern California, coincide with your love of surfing? Are you “stoked” to know that skateboarding will be featured in Tokyo for the 2020 Summer Olympics? If you’ve answered yes to any of the above questions, John O’Malley’s new book, “Urethane Revolution: The Birth of Skate-San Diego 1975,” is a must read. The always interesting, sometimes shocking, off-color page-turner dialogues the history of the skateboarding from one of its founding fathers, John O’Malley. Dubbed the “greatest story never told in extreme sports history,” O’Malley retraces his steps as a member of the original Skunkworks crew to creating his own skateparks. Photographs – sure to make everyone reminisce about the good ole’ days – accompany stories from the underground. “One crazy year on the California coast in 1975 a hippie skunkworks, bred in garages and shacks, launched the modern skater movement,” writes O’Malley. Strap in for a wild ride replete with two car chases, two plane crashes, a massive truck bomb, Colombian Narcos, the Mafia, senior White House staff, a gypsy fortuneteller, three straight-up miracles, Jacques Cousteau, big piles of cocaine and naked hippie chicks.” O’Malley details the books title, “Urethane Revolution” beginning with the history behind the urethane. “Around 1973, a guy named Frank Nasworthy discovered these urethane training wheels that were used on beginners’ roller skates,” he notes. “They were grippier than the unforgiving composite clay wheels of the day. Frank bolted them on his skateboard and bingo! Suction-cup traction like no one had ever imagined possible. It’s in that instant that the skateboard went from a toy with feet of clay to a wall-climbing UFO, screaming at warp speed to the 2020 Olympics.” The Revolution follows suit. “The Revolution began when a rift opened in the universe and that centrifugal buzz – heretofore available only through sports like surfing and skiing – came leaking out of the streets,” writes O’Malley. “Adrenaline rushing up your road, serotonin dripping down the drive. And the scales fell from our eyes: Any paved surface could be ridden. And the call went out: The rift has opened, God is great, spread the word.” According to O’Malley, a perfect storm of “ill winds” that began with a historic drought fueled the Revolution. “The drought uncovered insanely fun new skating forms like the reservoirs and drainage ditches while recession-vacant homes had their swimming pools drained and skated,” he pens. “Our eyes spoked an urban landscape lit up with a million new possibilities.” “Urethane Revolution” also showcases La Jolla native Bobby Turner. The innovative craftsman built Turner Summer/Ski slalom skateboards. Still popular today, these boards are constructed along the design vein of surfboards and snow skis. According to O’Malley, Turner’s skateboards “revolutionized” slalom skating boards. O’Malley touts, “The Revolution is over. Skaters won.” And if you need a place to play, check out Robb Field; San Diego’s first skateboard park constructed and operated by the City. Designed with input from the legendary Tony Hawk, the 40,000 square foot concrete park is suitable for all ages and skill levels. Sidling the San Diego River Bike Path at the onset of Ocean Beach, the “street course” features a combination bowl, handrails, ledges, blocks, a pump bump and an octagon volcano. Location: 2525 Bacon St.
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    joshuautley
    |
    June 20, 2019
    Revoked™ is proud to operate the local San Diego chapter of Skate for Change™.

    Skate for Change™ is committed to providing service to the community, especially low income families and the homeless, through local efforts. The primary activity is the organization of skateboarding youth to distribute care and resources to those in underprivileged circumstances. Revoked™ donates skateboards to young kids as well as water and other goods which we distribute on the streets around our area and to the places we visit.

    Skate for Change™ is seeking to have a dual impact. It provides service to those persons who are the recipients of the care, attention and meeting of needs on the streets. It also provides you with an opportunity to do something meaningful, provide service and purpose through their efforts.

    If you'd like to support the cause please visit our website to view our skateboard deck designs.

    https://revokedmob.com/skateboard/deck-designs
    Jessica Smith
    |
    June 17, 2019
    After being in relationship with Wilson for seven years,he broke up with me, I did everything possible to bring him back but all was in vain, I wanted him back so much because of the love I have for him, I begged him with everything, I made promises but he refused. I explained my problem to someone online and she suggested that I should contact a spell caster that could help me cast a spell to bring him back but I am the type that don’t believed in spell, I had no choice than to try it, I meant a spell caster called Dr Zuma zuk and I email him, and he told me there was no problem that everything will be okay before three days, that my ex will return to me before three days, he cast the spell and surprisingly in the second day, it was around 4pm. My ex called me, I was so surprised, I answered the call and all he said was that he was so sorry for everything that happened, that he wanted me to return to him, that he loves me so much. I was so happy and went to him, that was how we started living together happily again. Since then, I have made promise that anybody I know that have a relationship problem, I would be of help to such person by referring him or her to the only real and powerful spell caster who helped me with my own problem and who is different from all the fake ones out there. Anybody could need the help of the spell caster, his email: spiritualherbalisthealing@gmail.com or call him 2348105150446

    you can email him if you need his assistance in your relationship or anything. CONTACT HIM NOW FOR SOLUTION TO ALL YOUR PROBLEMS’
    Mr. Wilson
    |
    June 21, 2019
    Jessica, The spell wore off and I hit the road.
    Ska B. Flow
    |
    June 17, 2019
    Dave Dominy is correct, not Dave Dominey
    News
    Seven new chicks added to SeaWorld’s Flamingo Cove
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    Published - Saturday, June 08
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    Madeleine Albright to UC San Diego grads: ‘find your voice’
    Former U.S. Secretary of State will address graduating students June 15 at All Campus Commencement Former U.S. Secretary of State Madeleine K. Albright will deliver the keynote address to the gradu...
    Published - Friday, June 07
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    Local brother and sister team open gourmet sub shop in La Jolla
    For some, working with your younger brother or older sister might sound more annoying than fun. But for Kris Shea and Kathy Sandler, it was an opportunity to spend some much-needed quality time.   ...
    Published - Friday, June 07
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    The Black Crowes Revival to debut at Winston’s on June 11
    Southern rock may not have the same visibility it once did, but there can be no doubt that it remains immensely popular. One of the more modern practitioners, ’90s-era rockers The Black Crowes, is ...
    Published - Friday, June 07
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    Midway planners hear proposal on NAVWAR site
    Midway-Pacific Highway Community Planning Group in May vetted a controversial proposal to turn part of the Naval Information Warfare Systems Command (NAVWAR) site into a regional transportation “gr...
    Published - Friday, June 07
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    UC San Diego wins Commissioner's Cup
    Following one of its most successful years in the institution's athletics history, the University of California San Diego has claimed the 2018-19 California Collegiate Athletic Association (CCAA) R...
    Published - Thursday, June 06
    full story
    Top Point Loma grads to lead 94th commencement
    The valedictorian and salutatorian of Point Loma High's Class of 2019 agree on their view of the high school they are about to leave. "Point Loma is a well-rounded school," said valedictorian Clara...
    Published - Thursday, June 06
    full story
    San Diego International Boat Show returns to Spanish Landing June 6-9
    Expect to see motoryachts, sailboats, trailer boats, cruisers, pontoon boats, sportboats and luxury superyachts and megayachts as the annual summer San Diego International Boat Show splashes into t...
    Published - Thursday, June 06
    full story
    Bike advocate Andy Hanshaw to lead City’s new Mobility Board
    The City of San Diego recently appointed San Diego Bike Coalition executive director Andy Hanshaw to chair its new Mobility Board. As a local biking expert, Hanshaw plans to lead San Diego into a f...
    Published - Thursday, June 06
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    Jury acquits man in gasoline splashing at Fiesta Island
    After deliberating five hours over two days, a jury acquitted a man on June 5 of attempted murder and attempted manslaughter in the splashing of gasoline on a woman at Fiesta Island. The jury also ...
    Published - Thursday, June 06
    full story
    New vice principal joins Point Loma High School
    After decades of six-month-long Chicago winters, Dana Tolomeo is thrilled to be in San Diego. A veteran educator, Tolomeo was recently named to a vacant vice principal position at Point Loma High S...
    Published - Wednesday, June 05
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    Students go behind the scenes at Scripps Pier to learn about marine protected areas
    Even in California, there are children who still have yet to see the ocean. That’s something Wildcoast — an international nonprofit environmental organization located in Imperial Beach — aims to ch...
    Published - Wednesday, June 05
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    Tyga, Miguel, Slightly Stoopid, X Ambassadors and more announced in Wonderfront Festival lineup
    Some of the 80 artists performing at the inaugural Wonderfront Music & Arts Festival held Nov. 22-24 in downtown San Diego were finally announced on June 3.    Festival founders Paul Thornton and E...
    Published - Wednesday, June 05
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    Quintet of Pointer athletes earn honors
    Five PLHS athletes were recognized on all-CIF teams announced last weekend. Leading the pack is senior track star Altan Mitchell, who won two events at the league championship meet and one event at...
    Published - Wednesday, June 05
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