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    Pedal Ahead program promotes healthful living, less pollution
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Feb 18, 2021 | 19573 views | 0 0 comments | 37 37 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Two Pedal Ahead e-bikes, a black step-over, and storm-cloud color models, shown parked at the Law Street overlook in North PB. PHOTO BY KIM MERRILL
    Two Pedal Ahead e-bikes, a black step-over, and storm-cloud color models, shown parked at the Law Street overlook in North PB. PHOTO BY KIM MERRILL
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    A new electric bicycle emission-reducing program is designed to serve as an alternative to auto transportation.

    Dubbed Pedal Ahead, the groundbreaking new program partners Rider Safety Visibility, a nonprofit, with District 4 Supervisor Nathan Fletcher, and region-wide business and community leaders.

    “By bringing e-bikes into our communities, we are creating opportunities for environmental sustainability, healthful living, and helping people commute to work, school, and other important destinations,” said Fletcher.

    Rider Safety Visibility has partnered with Fletcher, along with community organizations to recruit e-bike riders to participate in this community-based electric bicycle program.

    "Pedal Ahead continues to define a new activism in healthy living and active lifestyles by capturing e-bike cycling data in real-time, and transforming lives,” said Rider Safety Visibility co-founder Ed Clancy. “Our program is contributing to community improvements by injecting positive lifestyle choices, providing goals, and in working with a new audience of advocates for alternative transportation.” 

    “The bicycle industry, with an emphasis on e-bikes, is also affording many opportunities for job seekers through Rider Safety Visibility’s Young Adult Education program, including mechanics, bike shop staff, and sales and marketing representatives,” said Kim Merrill, Rider Safety Visibility co-founder.

    “The opportunity to learn the ins and outs of electric bicycles is paramount, as they have become a growing transportation solution during the pandemic. In the post-coronavirus era, e-bikes will continue to have a bright future. The industry needs professionals who understand this growing category of bicycles.”

    The way Pedal Ahead works is e-bikes are made available to people ages 18 and up. Participants are required to ride a minimum average of 1,800 miles a year, for two years, in order to provide in-depth analytics for an e-bike impact study.

    As part of the Pedal Ahead program, Rider Safety Visibility provides each participant with a safety and visibility package from leading bicycle industry manufacturers that includes a helmet, high-visibility vest, front-and-rear bicycle lights, and lock for security. Each e-bike is also equipped with devices that secure front wheels and seats.

    At the conclusion of the program, and after meeting the mileage goal, the Pedal Ahead participant becomes the owner of the e-bike they’ve ridden.

    Beach residents who’ve tried Pedal Ahead give it a thumbs up.

    "Peddle Ahead has been such a game changer for me to make biking to work a feasible option,” said PB resident Kim Heinle. “It eliminates the stress of uphill climbs, especially when carting my laptop and work clothes. The best part about the e-bikes though is that I use it like a regular bike to get my cardio and exercise in, and then flip on the e-portion when I'm commuting. It's a two-for-one bike.”

    “I haven’t owned a bike in over 20 years, but during the recent pandemic I bought a mountain bike to get outside and exercise,” said Roxanne Chrestman of Ocean Beach. “I’m pretty excited to say I have ridden my bike more than 400 miles just this year.”

    “I thought it was a great idea to get an electric bike,” said 63-year-old Jo-Anna Mitrano of Bay Park, a YMCA fitness instructor. “Because of my wish to be low on the carbon footprint, I gave up my car and became all bike. It’s perfect. I can still commute to work and get the daylight in. It’s just so energizing.”

    Pedal Ahead was envisioned, designed and created by Fletcher and Rider Safety Visibility, with initial funding provided by San Diego County, The Left Coast Fund, The San Diego Foundation’s COVID-19 Response Fund, and SDG&E.

    La Jolla’s California Bicycle and Uptown Bicycles are the independent-owned bicycle dealers supporting the Pedal Ahead program as community centers and service providers. The e-bikes they provide for the program are available in District 4 ZIP codes, which include beach areas. 

    A total of 21 Pedal Ahead riders in the 92106, 92107, 92109, 92110, and 92037 ZIP codes, as of Feb. 1, had logged 8,858 miles through the e-bike program. Overall, year to date, those same riders have produced a 3,550 kg CO2 reduction using an e-bike versus a passenger car, according to figures compiled by Rider Safety Visibility. The 200 riders in the program’s first phase have logged nearly 52,000 miles and produced a 20,760 kg CO2 emissions reduction.

     

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    Pacific Beach school has success with in-person teaching
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Feb 18, 2021 | 3127 views | 0 0 comments | 21 21 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Students work on a project at St. Paul's Lutheran Church and School in Pacific Beach. COURTESY PHOTO
    Students work on a project at St. Paul's Lutheran Church and School in Pacific Beach. COURTESY PHOTO
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    Talk of reopening in-class instruction in the midst of the pandemic hasn’t phased St. Paul's Lutheran Church and School in Pacific Beach. The institution at 1376 Felspar St. has been open in-person, with all the proper health and safety protocols in-place, since September 2020. “We closed our classes on March 13, 2020, and sent everyone home,” said Meredith Binnie, principal of the K-8 private, parochial school, now in its 74th year in PB. “We were up and running the next week with virtual learning and finished out the school year online. When we came back to school in September it was in-person, and our students are getting good, safe learning.” Binnie talked about what St. Paul’s did to reopen its school and keep its students safe and healthy during COVID.   “A lot of what we did was driven by the guidelines set forth by the state and county in order for us to get a waiver to reopen,” said Binnie. “They wanted physical distancing with students six-feet apart, so classrooms had to rearrange the desks to provide for maximum spacing. All the desks and chairs are separated, plus each child has their own personal plastic dividers.” Added Binnie, “The teachers all have large plexiglass shields they can teach behind. Teachers have microphones to amplify their voices. We’ve kept all the kids in nine different classes in stable groups (to decrease possible virus exposure). We limit the number of people on-campus. It’s been very doable.” Returning to in-class instruction is what families at St. Paul’s wanted. “We did a parent survey and 95% of parents wanted their kids to return in-person,” Binnie said. “Our nine teachers, one for each grade, were also all on-board.” Binnie said school parents were cooperative in doing what it took to get their children back in class. “The most important thing we stressed was that parents needed to be honest in not sending their kids to school sick,” the principal said. “And every morning at drop-off, we screened kids with temperature checks asking how they were feeling.” During the school day, Binnie said St. Paul’s required three basic things for all of its students. “They had to wear masks, we kept them in stable groups and they had to be physically distanced,” she said. And the health protocols St. Paul’s employed to keep its students safe has worked. “We have had two students test positive since we have been open,” Binnie said. “However, we were able to just send those two classes home for two weeks of virtual learning, and then they returned. No other students or teachers in the classes tested positive during that time and the positive students were asymptomatic.” Being back in the classroom has proved positive for everyone, concluded Binnie. “It’s so gratifying for me as a school leader to see how excited the kids are to be at school each day, how it’s really good for them mentally and socially,” she said. “They’re just so happy to be at play at recess with their friends. And we couldn’t do it without our wonderful teachers. They’ve worked so hard to really adapt their teaching styles. And it’s really taken a buy-in, from all the stakeholders, to make it work.”
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    Birch Aquarium celebrates baby Weedy Seadragons’ first birthdays
    Feb 17, 2021 | 8244 views | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Two Weedy Seadragons were hatched at Birch Aquarium at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego in February 2020. COURTESY PHOTO
    Two Weedy Seadragons were hatched at Birch Aquarium at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego in February 2020. COURTESY PHOTO
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    Last week marked one year since two Weedy Seadragons were hatched at Birch Aquarium at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego. In honor of the thriving babies, Birch Aquarium is celebrating by launching a live Seadragon cam and an exclusive collection of Weedy Seadragon merchandise in a new online store. 

    The babies, born on Feb. 11 and 12, were less than one-inch at birth and are now nearly 9  inches long. The births marked the first time Birch Aquarium bred Weedy Seadragons, becoming one of the few aquariums in the world to have hatched these unusual fish. 
    “We have been working with seadragons since 1996. Since then, we have learned so much about caring for these very fascinating fish,” said associate curator Leslee Matsushige, who heads the aquarium’s Seadragon Conservation Program. “It has been very exciting to have successfully hatched baby weedy seadragons and have them continue to thrive. We look forward  to watching them grow into mature adults, and join others in our collection to potentially breed and produce more baby seadragons.” 
     
    Seadragons

    • The babies have been behind-the-scenes since birth, but are now large enough to be added in with the other seadragons. They are now in the main habitat in the Seadragons & Seahorses exhibition. 

    • Though Birch Aquarium remains closed to the public, people can now view the baby Weedy Seadragons, along with several others, live 24/7 on the brand new Seadragon Cam. Tune in to the feed, which is hosted by HDOnTap, to see how many Weedy Seadragons you can spot as they camouflage themselves in the seaweed.

      • Be sure to tune in Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Saturdays between 2-3 p.m., when aquarists feed the seadragons, and they are at their most active.

    • For the first time, Birch Aquarium’s Gift Shop is going digital with an exclusive capsule collection of Weedy Seadragon merchandise, which will be available beginning Friday. The limited-edition items are available online only for a short period of time. Proceeds from sales support the care and conservation of Birch Aquarium’s animals, so we can continue to help fragile species like these thrive, even during these difficult times.


    Weedy Seadragons are native to southern Australia, and Birch Aquarium has had a population on display, and as part of a behind-the-scenes breeding program since 2012. The Seadragon Breeding Program was created because of the aquarium’s success in breeding other seahorse, or signathid, species. Since 1995 Birch Aquarium has bred thirteen different seahorse species, sharing more than 5,000 captive-raised seahorses with other aquariums around the world. 

    Once listed as “near threatened” by the IUCN, International Union for the Conservation of Nature, the conservation status of Weedy Seadragons has been downgraded to “least concern” — partially because of the lack of population data. Their remote habitat along Australia’s rugged and underpopulated Southern Coast makes observation difficult. This isolation, combined with their expert camouflage, makes population counts challenging even for the most experienced seadragon-spotters. 

    Seadragons and seahorses face challenges in the wild: climate change, warming ocean, compromised habitats, destructive fishing practices like bottom trawling, and unsustainable collection practices for home aquariums and traditional medicine. Captive breeding programs, like that at Birch Aquarium, alleviate pressure on wild populations and contributes to Species Survival Plans (SSPs), as outlined by The Association of Zoos and Aquariums

    For more information, visit https://aquarium.ucsd.edu. Reopening details will be announced soon. 

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    BLACK HISTORY MONTH - San Diego History Center honors the city’s Black heroes
    by KAREN SCANLON
    Feb 10, 2021 | 29978 views | 0 0 comments | 21 21 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    John Henry Turpin stands on a San Diego dock in the hours following the Bennington disaster in July 1905. One of only a few Black sailors in the U.S. Navy at the time, Turpin survived two shipboard explosions. (Photo courtesy San Diego History Center.)
    John Henry Turpin stands on a San Diego dock in the hours following the Bennington disaster in July 1905. One of only a few Black sailors in the U.S. Navy at the time, Turpin survived two shipboard explosions. (Photo courtesy San Diego History Center.)
    slideshow

    February marks Black History Month and San Diego History Center has launched a new exhibit titled, Celebrate San Diego: Black History & Heritage. Though the center is currently closed to the public, everyone can encounter the exhibit at https://sandiegohistory.org/exhibition/celebratesd_blackhistoryheritage/.

    We’ve experienced wonderful success in collecting community-sourced content through our “Share Your Story” COVID-19 initiative,” SDHC president/CEO Bill Lawrence said.

    A virtual timeline celebration acknowledges historical events of African Americans who lived in San Diego County, which includes the following nuggets of interest. Some of the heroes will also be recognized in a 24-foot wide feature at the Balboa Park SDHC Museum.

    In 1913, Henrietta Goodwin became the first African American graduate from the State Normal School of San Diego (now San Diego State University). Goodwin was not listed on the school’s roster of 15 graduates, which is likely why San Diego Union excluded her in its announcement. Let it be known, however, that both an attendance ledger and registration record indicated that this young Black woman entered the school in 1908 and graduated in January 1913.

    The Colored Voters Political Club was the first Black bureaucratic organization in San Diego. By the early 1900s, the city’s Black population swelled dramatically, though still less than one percent of the populace. With this increase, they formed groups to express themselves in ways not permitted in a predominately White setting.

    In 1887, Solomon and Cordelia Johnson were instrumental in the formation of the Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church. The congregation met in the Johnson home at F and Union streets until funds were raised to secure a church site at 1647 Front St.

    Remembering San Diego’s 1905 naval disaster brings attention to John Henry Turpin, one of only a few Black sailors in the U.S. Navy at the time. Born in New Jersey in 1876, Turpin enlisted in the Navy in 1896. In 1917 he was promoted as one of the Navy’s first African American chief petty officers.

    During Turpin’s 29-year naval career, he survived two shipboard explosions: the first in 1898 on the battleship USS Maine, Havana Harbor, Cuba. The explosion, which contributed to the outbreak of the Spanish-American War, killed 260 seamen.

    A second explosion, took place in San Diego when two boilers let loose aboard the Navy gunboat, USS Bennington, in July 1905. One officer and 65 sailors died.

    In both incidents, a stunned Turpin rescued a number of injured and dying shipmates, swimming them to shore one by one. Eleven of Bennington’s crew, for similar actions taken, received the Navy’s highest service award, the Medal of Honor. Turpin did not!

    Our hero transferred to the Fleet Reserve in 1919, also qualified as a master diver and retired from the U.S. Navy in 1925 to Bremerton, Wash.
    Jamaican born Turpin fought for a country that never fully recognized him, until now. (President John Kennedy approved his Medal of Honor nomination for the posthumous award in the 1960s, but it went to the government’s back burner. Current efforts are underway.)

    In September 2020, the U.S. House of Representatives unanimously passed legislation to rename Washington’s Bremerton Post Office to honor John Henry Turpin.

    Let’s all salute San Diego’s Black history, citizens that lived in, and stepped out of, the shadow of what was rightfully theirs.

     

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    Valentine’s Day drinks, food and fun in Pacific Beach and La Jolla
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Feb 05, 2021 | 4971 views | 0 0 comments | 24 24 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Specialty cocktails are available for Valentine’s Day at La Valencia Hotel in La Jolla. COURTESY PHOTO
    Specialty cocktails are available for Valentine’s Day at La Valencia Hotel in La Jolla. COURTESY PHOTO
    slideshow

    Like just about everything else, Valentine’s Day and weekend are going to be observed a little bit differently this year. But COVID or not, there are things to do, places to go and special deals for romantic interludes to be had in coastal restaurants from Pacific Beach to La Jolla.

    Jodi Rudick, executive director for La Jolla Village Merchants Association, had several ideas for what to do in “the Jewel” to celebrate the mid-February holiday classic.

    “A romantic stroll through the art galleries is one of the most romantic ways to spend some time with the one you love,” Rudick suggested. “Art is a great way to get to know someone on a different level.  Whether you’re enjoying the incredible photography of Peter Lik, Thomas Mangelsen, Ian Elly, or Nathan Myhrvold (Modernist Cuisine Gallery), or prefer the whimsy of Dr. Seuss, Keith Haring or Roy Lichtenstein, La Jolla boasts dozens of galleries, jewelers and boutiques that are perfect for browsing with Galentines, Valentines or on your own.”

    And don’t forget the wildlife.

    “Of course, La Jolla is famous for its seals, sea lions and sunsets – a trifecta of nature’s perfection,” pointed out Rudick. “Nothing is more fun than watching seal moms teaching their brand new pups to swim and surf in the waves.  It’s not only mesmerizing but a reminder of how lucky we are to access the coast.”

    Added Rudick: “For those looking for incredible dining with a view, nothing beats La Jolla’s selection of restaurants, eateries and cafes.  Whether you want to grab-and-go for a picnic at the Cove, or are looking for al fresca options, La Jolla literally has something for all budgets and tastes.

    LA JOLLA

    - La Valencia Hotel at 1132 Prospect St. is serving up love with a coursed meal prepared by chef Timothy Ralphs with specialty Valentine's cocktails. Enjoy an amuse bouche starter, choice of beef or salmon entree, and dessert for $89 per person. Finish your romantic evening with a sweet take-home gift when you dine at the Pink Lady. Now accepting reservations through OpenTable.

    “Order a La Valencia gift card online and treat the one you love to a La Jolla getaway with no expiration date,” said hotel marketing manager Annalise Dewhurst. Feeding San Diego supporters can make a donation and send a special e-card to a loved one this Valentine's Day, with all funds helping to provide nutritious meals for people facing hunger. ESET is generously matching all e-card donations up to $20K. Learn more about the campaign at feedingsandiego.org/spreadlovesandiego.

    - Why keep romance to just one day? Feel the love and connection this February at Estancia La Jolla Hotel & Spa at 9700 N. Torrey Pines Road as you reconnect with your special someone all month long. Whether you’re looking for tasty cocktails, couples yoga or private dinners, your stay will be filled with love. Guests and locals alike can taste the flavors of love with Greenfinch Bar’s specialty Valentine cocktails to-go menu. Additionally, the hotel will be having an Aphrodisiacs & Oysters event on Saturday, Feb. 13 and 20, which will feature French 75s and live oyster shucking.

    - Beaumont’s at 5662 La Jolla Blvd. in is pulling out all the stops this year with it’s “Night In Paris” Valentine’s menu. The special menu includes choice of starter, entrée, and dessert. Wine pairings available. Reservations encouraged.

    - Roberta at Piazza 1909 will feature a special four-course menu, with choices for starter, taste of a pasta or gluten free option, entree and a dessert to share prepared by the pastry chef. Seatings start at 4 p.m., with last seating at 9 p.m.

    PACIFIC BEACH

    - A Valentine's weekend kayak/SUP paddle event will take place at noon Saturday, Feb. 13. Starting point is between Bahia Point and Mission Bay Yacht Club. Suggesting launching area: Bahia Point (behind the Bahia Hotel). Paddle will be from Bahia Point to the Catamaran Hotel and back. This event is free and open to the public (wear something red). This is a social distance event (everyone is on their own kayak/SUP), and masks are required.

    - Watch the sun set at Crystal Pier or at one of the many outdoor dining options that border the immediate beach area and provide a spectacular ocean overlook.

    - Maybe you don’t have a special someone, but but still feel love for tacos? Or if you want to share with special friend, savor tacos for two this Valentine’s Day at City Tacos. The taqueria will holdits signature Love + Tacos special, featuring two tacos per person, two drinks, and two churros for $22. Pair your meal with any beverage including aguas frescas, micheladas, or a classic Mexican soda, and end on a sweet note with churros. City Tacos Pacific Beach is at 4516 Mission Blvd. and is currently open for outdoor dining, take-out, and delivery.

    - Nothing says love quite like brunch, and Mavericks Beach Club relaunched its weekend brunches just in time for Valentine’s Day. On Sunday, Feb. 14, surprise your sweetheart by taking them out for delicious dishes and deals. From 10 a.m.-1 p.m., celebrate with $15 bottles of champagne or rosé, Bloody Mary's, Bloody Beers, and Bubble Slushie Buckets. Chow down on Loaded Avocado Toast or The Cali Dude Breakfast Burrito. Mavericks is at 860 Garnet Ave.

    - PB Fish Shop wants to treat you and your loved one to a specialty Tequila Lime Linguini on Valentine’s Day this year. Available for outdoor dining or takeout, from 11 a.m.-9 p.m., you can enjoy linguini pasta with sautéed shrimp and bay scallops tossed in a decadent tequila lime crème sauce. Pair with any of the wines found on the menu, or local beers, including the beer of the month - Gravity Heights Oatmeal Stout. PB Fish Shop will also have desserts made by The French Gourmet. PB Fish Shop is at 1775 Garnet Ave.

     

     

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