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    Residents rally to move recycling center from Voltaire Street
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Feb 16, 2018 | 4988 views | 2 2 comments | 9 9 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Peninsula Community Planning Board chair Jon Linney (right) speaks at the Feb. 10 rally next to Stump’s. THOMAS MELVILLE / PENINSULA BEACON
    Peninsula Community Planning Board chair Jon Linney (right) speaks at the Feb. 10 rally next to Stump’s. THOMAS MELVILLE / PENINSULA BEACON
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    A neighborhood coup is underway to compel Prince Recycling Center to move from its present site at 3770 Voltaire St., adjoining Stump’s Family Marketplace, to a more suitable spot in Midway District behind Big Lots off Rosecrans Street. Some residents, who feel the recycler is misplaced and want it moved, rallied in front of the recycler at Stumps on Feb. 10. Nearby residents, corridor businesses, the nonprofit Point Loma Association and market owner Dirk Stump weighed-in with the media on their cause.  The rally was to draw attention to alleged crime-related issues associated with homeless utilizing, and loitering, in and around the allegedly problematic recycler. Recycling center owner Jamie Prince said he was mystified, and a little taken aback, by public reaction to his operations. “I was never contacted by anyone at all about any problems,” Prince told the Peninsula Beacon. “Then all of a sudden, it was all over social media and I said, ‘What’s going on?’” Prince feels scapegoated. “I’m not the reason for the homeless problem in the area,” he said, noting “there’s always been a homeless problem.” He added, “I have a clean site and the homeless are just a small part of our business.”  Prince pointed out, under state law, “We can’t refuse a person service.” He pointed out the number one rule at his center is “no shopping carts,” adding he always tries to be a good neighbor and respond to the community’s concerns. Rally spokesperson Margaret Virissimo, a member of the Peninsula Community Planning Board, said she and others tried unsuccessfully to reach Prince offline. She noted the purpose of the rally was being mischaracterized. “It really wasn’t a protest so much,” Virissimo said. “We definitely don’t want to see [Prince] go [out of business]. We want to help him relocate, and even offered to fundraise to help with his moving costs to show him we care.” Virissimo contended Prince Recycling “is in too small a space and that it is negatively affecting nearby businesses.” She added the center, and its lingering homeless population, is a threat given its proximity to three local schools. “Neighborhood recycling centers should be a positive asset, however, the Point Loma recycling center has caused several neighborhood problems,” said District 2 Councilmember Lorie Zapf. “In fact, calls to SDPD for service to this block have increased by more than 50 percent.” Zapf aide Conrad Wear noted recent police statistics show a direct causal connection between local crime and the recycling center’s location. “We used the call rate from January 2017 to August 2017 to project calls through the end of that year,” said Wear. “They would have totaled 156. After comparing that to 2015, we have seen an approximately 59 percent increase in calls to service to this location between 2015 and 2017, from 93 to 156.”  Julie Borcher chairs the PLA’s Public Safety Committee. She said the civic group has researched the CalRecycle program, under which Prince’s center operates and, according to her, is receiving state subsidies.   “The state requires stores like Stump’s to provide CA CRV redemption for bottles and cans within a one-half mile radius,” Borcher said. “Stump’s was required by the state to provide this type of facility or face $100 per day in penalties.” Borcher contended having recyclers in the middle of neighborhoods, like Prince’s, “may have made some sense in the early 1980s when the program was introduced and curb side recycling was less common. But the PLA believes the program is leading to the degradation of neighborhoods in which these centers are located.”    Market owner Dirk Stump said no one wants Prince’s relocated more than him. “It’s a problem for the store,” Stump said, adding the constant homeless presence “scares off the elderly, kids and moms.” Stump said he’s personally been victimized by a homeless woman, now serving time in custody, who came in and destroyed merchandise in the market, and threatened him personally, before being subdued and arrested. “I’ve been trying to get [recycling center] moved ever since,” Stump said. “Protests and photo-ops are great for gaining public awareness of an issue,” said PCPB chair Jon Linney, one of three protest organizers at the Feb. 10 rally. Said Linney: “More important are the breakthroughs we are achieving on something that has frustrated the community for more than three years. I could not be prouder of the way everyone has conducted themselves.” Another PCPB member, Don Sevrens, said recycling rally organizers have reached out to Ken Da Rosa, deputy director of CalRecycle. “They are hoping the agency might be willing to try a more cooperative, more proactive approach,” Sevrens said. Opponents of the recycling center at Stump’s are petitioning State Assemblyman Todd Gloria to carry legislation, which would need to be sponsored soon, to expand the half-mile requirement for recycling centers to possibly allow it to be moved from Stump’s to the proposed Midway District location.
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    Geoff Page
    |
    February 16, 2018
    I don't understand the claim that they could not contact Prince. He has a Facebook page with a telephone number. I called the number and he answered after two rings. I believe he is telling the truth when he claimed he was not contacted before this all happened.
    PeninsulaPat
    |
    February 16, 2018
    Maybe they can move it to the shopping center further up the Point where Jensens is. Oh wait, they can't put it there because it would attract the wrong element, just like a CVS would.
    Celebrating Black History Month: Former San Diego Gulls winger Willie O'Ree broke NHL color barrier with Boston
    by SCOTT HOPKINS
    Feb 14, 2018 | 6588 views | 2 2 comments | 11 11 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Willie O'Ree prepares to drop a ceremonial puck before a recent San Diego Gulls game. O'Ree, a former Gulls player, was the first black player in the NHL 60 years ago. At left is current Gull Jaycob Megna and at right John McCarthy of the San Jose Barracuda. SAN DIEGO GULLS / COURTESY
    Willie O'Ree prepares to drop a ceremonial puck before a recent San Diego Gulls game. O'Ree, a former Gulls player, was the first black player in the NHL 60 years ago. At left is current Gull Jaycob Megna and at right John McCarthy of the San Jose Barracuda. SAN DIEGO GULLS / COURTESY
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    Former member of the San Diego Gulls Willie O'Ree, left, is presented a jersey by the current Gulls team during a night honoring the legendary O'Ree. The native of Fredericton, New Brunswick was the first black player in the National Hockey League when he joined the Boston Bruins in 1958. SAN DIEGO GULLS / COURTESY
    Former member of the San Diego Gulls Willie O'Ree, left, is presented a jersey by the current Gulls team during a night honoring the legendary O'Ree. The native of Fredericton, New Brunswick was the first black player in the National Hockey League when he joined the Boston Bruins in 1958. SAN DIEGO GULLS / COURTESY
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    On Jan. 18, 1958, a young hockey player was called up from the minor leagues to join the Boston Bruins of the National Hockey League, who were in Montreal for a game at the Forum, home of the Canadiens. His name was Willie O'Ree, and history was made that night. Why? O'Ree is black. And, while he only played in two games that season, the color barrier in professional hockey had been broken, giving O'Ree the honorable designation as the "Jackie Robinson of hockey." Born Oct. 15, 1935, in the coal-mining town of Fredericton, New Brunswick, O'Ree was the youngest of 13 children. Driven to succeed in both athletics and academics, he soon began to believe he could compete in sports at a pro level. As a youngster in 1949, he also received an invitation from the Atlanta Braves to their minor league baseball camp. When he deplaned in Atlanta, he recalls seeing the drinking fountains marked "White Only" and "Colored Only." While in the United States, however, O'Ree had the opportunity to meet black baseball star Jackie Robinson in Brooklyn. “I knew he broke the color barrier,” O’Ree recalls, “and when I actually met him he said, ‘There’s no black kids that play hockey.’ And I said, ‘Yeah, there’s a few.'” Robinson told him “Whatever sport you choose, work hard and do your very best. Things will work out for you.” O'Ree returned in 1961 to play 43 games for the Bruins, scoring four goals and adding 10 assists. And while those were the only games he played in the NHL, the door had opened for black players to compete at the highest level. O'Ree's greatest strengths were the speed with which he could skate and his checking ability on defense. While he was not imposing in stature at 5 feet 10 inches tall and 170 pounds, his toughness, determination and speed allowed him to make a considerable impact driving opposing players into the boards. His Boston teammates stuck up for him, but in one game Eric Nesterenko of the Chicago Black Hawks hit him in the face with the butt end of his stick, knocking out two of O'Ree's teeth and breaking his nose. O'Ree responded by hitting Nesterenko over the head with his stick, igniting a fight between the teams... with Nesterenko acquiring 15 new stitches in his head. "I was prepared for it [verbal and physical abuse] because I knew it would happen. I wasn’t a great slugger, but I did my share of fighting. I was determined that I wasn’t going to be run out of the rink,” O'Ree recalled. In 1967, general manager Max McNabb of the nascent San Diego Gulls of the Western Hockey League acquired O'Ree from the rival Los Angels Blades, and O'Ree immediately became a fan favorite as he accelerated to full skating speed in four or five strides and rushed the opponents' net. Record-size minor league crowds at the then San Diego Sports Arena roared as O'Ree won the WHL goal-scoring title with 38 in 1968-69. With his 41 assists, he totaled 79 points in 70 games. After his retirement in 1979, O'Ree settled in San Diego and today lives in La Mesa. O'Ree kept a secret during his playing career that spanned 28 years: One afternoon in the mid 1950s, a puck ricocheted off a stick and struck O'Ree in the right eye, shattering his retina. He lost 97 percent of the vision in the eye, which had to be removed years later. Doctors urged him to hang up his skates. Eight weeks later he was back on the ice where he switched from left wing to right wing so he could see the puck better, yet fearing his career would end if his handicap were discovered. Eventually, the NHL took note of O'Ree's historic status and in 1998 invited him to be the director of youth development for its Diversity Task Force, a nonprofit program for minority youth that provides equipment and ice time so inner-city kids might learn and play hockey in its "Hockey is for Everyone" program. On Jan. 19, 2008, the Boston Bruins and NHL honored O'Ree at TD Garden marking the 50th anniversary of his debut. Those in attendance included a busload of O'Ree's friends from his native Fredericton. The next month, ESPN aired a special program on O'Ree in honor of Black History Month. Last month marked the 60th anniversary of O'Ree's first game, and O'Ree once again returned to Boston to be honored. "It’s wonderful and I was thrilled," O'Ree recalled. "When I was in Boston [last month] it took me back to when I first came to the Bruins and the training camp in 1957. I kind of fell in love with the team and the entire Bruins organization." NHL Commissioner Gary Bettman noted O'Ree has impacted more than 40,000 children in his 20-year NHL ambassador career. "Willie has a resolve and an inner strength that allows him to do what he believes and not let anything get in his way," Bettman said. O'Ree has received many other awards including the Order of Canada, the highest civilian award for a Canadian citizen. The love affair between San Diego hockey fans and Willie O'Ree has continued to grow over the decades. When not on the road as part of his NHL commitment, O'Ree, now 82 years old, can be found enjoying a San Diego Gulls game at the Valley View Casino Center. Always upbeat, he never denies an autograph request. While his number 20 jersey has hung from the arena rafters for several years, the Gulls recently honored O'Ree at a Diversity Night-themed game. He conducted the ceremonial puck drop to a standing ovation from over 8,500 fans. O'Ree has overcome much in his life and, through hard work and determination, earned his status as a local legend and hero. QUOTABLE:  FROM HOCKEY LEGEND WILLIE O'REE “Racist remarks from fans were much worse in the U.S. cities than in Toronto and Montreal. I particularly remember a few incidents in Chicago. The fans would yell, ‘Go back to the South’ and ‘How come you’re not picking cotton?’ Things like that. It didn’t bother me. Hell, I’d been called names most of my life. I just wanted to be a hockey player, and if they couldn’t accept that fact, that was their problem, not mine. “In the penalty box, stuff would be thrown at me and they’d spit at me. I never fought one time because of racial remarks. But I said, ‘If I’m going to leave the league, it’s because I don’t have the skills or the ability to play anymore. I’m not going to leave it ’cause some guy makes a threat or tries to get me off my game by making racial remarks towards me." "We have approximately 32 cities in the Hockey is For Everyone program, and the first thing I say is to these boys and girls is to stay in school and get an education. Education is the key. You can’t go anywhere today in the world without an education."  "You need to set goals for yourselves, and you need to work towards your goals and believe and feel good about yourself and like yourself." "If you think you can then you can, and if you think you can’t, you’re right."     
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    Doug 1974
    |
    February 14, 2018
    I remember watching O'Ree when he played with the old L.A. Blades of the WHL and the writer is correct, O'Ree was an amazingly fast skater. It's too bad he was born a generation too early as he would have been a big NHL star once the league expanded.
    Scott Hopkins
    |
    February 15, 2018
    Good point, Doug. The players in the old Western Hockey League probably would be NHLers today with 31 teams. Back in the day, the NHL consisted of only six teams, leaving very few roster spots for players like Willie. But then we may never have had the privilege of seeing him play in San Diego!
    Ocean Beach woman’s vision and hard work creates successful Annie Margot Designs
    by LUCIA VITI
    Feb 13, 2018 | 4017 views | 1 1 comments | 11 11 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Ocean Beach resident Annie Margot St. Lifer with her eclectic collection of African Mud Cloth-embellished, Levi-denim jackets.
    Ocean Beach resident Annie Margot St. Lifer with her eclectic collection of African Mud Cloth-embellished, Levi-denim jackets.
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    Chic. Funky. Cool. One-of-a-kind designer jackets, presented by Annie Margot Designs, are splashing their way through San Diego. Spearheaded by fashion designer Annie Margot St. Lifer, this eclectic collection of African Mud Cloth-embellished, Levi-denim jackets are replete with color, swank and fashion pizzazz. An array of “100 percent handmade,” tailored denim overlays weave trendy with vintage, showcasing the young designer’s extraordinary talent. In less than a year, St. Lifer’s one-time hobby turned business venture has” blossomed into a reality right before my eyes.” Humbled by her own success, the Ocean Beach resident admits that “my dream evolved into a successful assembly line of artisan professionals who are dedicated to supporting each other.” Encouraged by “the environment” and “fellow artisans” the former New Yorker describes her journey as a step-by-step process that began with kudos. Within weeks of arriving in the coastal city, the “artisan shop gal” immersed herself in San Diego’s “maker’s culture,” a scene she describes as “big,” to learn everything she could about the local artisan ethos. “San Diego’s a small big city that hosts a large maker’s scene,” she said. “Artisans support artisans and local makers support each other. After creating my first jacket for fun, everyone encouraged me to pursue designing more.” St. Lifer designed her first jacket with a “deconstructed Banjara belt that I found in a flea market in Santa Cruz.” An instant hit, she fabricated more with vestiges from thrifting excursions – Afghan beads, Indian elephant designs and reconstructed handbags – “found in my closet.” Encouraged by the positive feedback, she tested her next batch on Instagram. When the entire inventory sold out within 48 hours, the budding fashionista knew she found her niche. The Maryland native quickly put her passion into action. Always “obsessed” with thrifting, St. Lifer continued her “treasure hunts” in Goodwill and Salvation Army stores, consignment shops, flea and farmer’s markets and second-hand boutique stores. “The magic really begins with thrifting through every consignment shop imaginable,” she continued. “Thrifting’s a passion. I’ve accumulated quite the unique collection of statement pieces – vintage band tee’s, ’80s denims, designer handbags, fabrics and textiles.” While honeymooning in Thailand, she “fell in love” with the country’s myriad of colored and patterned textiles and fabrics. African Mud Cloth became the lightbulb moment for making her brand “cohesive.” African Mud Cloth, a popular textile from Mali Africa, is made with fermented mud, a time-consuming process described as strange and cumbersome. The fabric contains a tapestry of colorful, detailed patterns popular in fashion, design and art. “African Mud Cloth speaks to my heart,” she said. “The hearty cloth is funky, versatile and beautiful. The colors are simple but the textile’s filled with intricate details. Pillows and throws are often made from huge pieces of this fabric. African Mud Cloth won’t fall off the trending bandwagon. It’s too classic and timeless.” St. Lifer’s refusal to use anything but vintage Levi jackets, makes production “more difficult because I don’t have a lot of inventory all at once.” However, St. Lifer has no plans to change jacket brand because “Levi’s a classic, great, American denim brand.” “Every Annie Margot Design jacket is a quality, handmade product,” she explained. “And I wouldn’t have it any other way.” While surprised by her instant success, St. Lifer’s not shocked. Annie Margot Designs has been “years in the making.” Touting a fashion and merchandising degree from West Virginia University, the Mountaineer has been thrifting since college, garnering ideas, inspirations and all things vintage. She moved to the Big Apple in 2009 to pursue a career in fashion, landing a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity as an intern in Fendi’ s Visual Merchandising Department. The tour-de-force turned employee became an assistant store manager within six years. New York City became a haven for collecting “precious possessions.” “I’m surprised, proud and excited by my success,” she said. “But I’m not shocked. I’ve put a lot of everything into Annie Margot Designs. My visions to create became distracted by life until I moved to San Diego. Despite working for an extraordinary company like Fendi in New York, here I focus on what I wanted to do among my people - other artisans. “I learned who I was in Morgantown,” she concluded. “In New York City I became her. Now I’m building my dream in Ocean Beach. Every stage along the way has made me more comfortable with who I am; designer Annie Margot St. Lifer – that’s who I am!” Annie Margot Designs also include zip pouches. Embellished jeans will soon follow. Custom orders are available. Annie Margot Designer jackets can be purchased in Ocean Beach’s Often Wander at Noon and Costal Natives; La Jolla’s Totem Boutique and Trilogy Sanctuary, as well as online at www.anniemargotdesigns.com.
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    Gail Cohen
    |
    February 14, 2018
    Gorgeous, great story.
    Point Loma Fish Shop is right at home on the Peninsula
    by MARTIN JONES WESTLIN
    Feb 12, 2018 | 1788 views | 0 0 comments | 9 9 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Two spicy Dorado tacos go well with a local craft beer at Point Loma Fish House. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Two spicy Dorado tacos go well with a local craft beer at Point Loma Fish House. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    The Point Loma Fish Shop is now open at 1110 Rosecrans St. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    The Point Loma Fish Shop is now open at 1110 Rosecrans St. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    Seattle lays claim to the world’s largest private residential yacht, the 2014 NFL championship and approximately 154 percent of the nation’s total annual rainfall. It also boasts Pike Place Market, the world’s 39th most visited urban attraction and a critical marker for the city’s fishing trade. Ancient mongers rule the roost from 5 a.m. every day, gruffly hawking regional salmon and ahi favorites as though their lives weigh in the balance (because they often do). The folks at Point Loma Fish Shop don’t keep such ungodly hours. Neither do they seem to be under a death watch while their managers push product as though their lives weigh in the balance (because they often do). But this eatery has one critical feature that handsomely competes with that at Pike Place – the unmistakable aroma of fresh catches and the nearby sea that yields them.  One flurry at your nostrils and lungs, and you’ll know you’re in the right place.  That translates to a clutch of delicious menu entrees, featuring no fewer than 11 types of fish and several marinades to choose from, ranging in size from a simple taco to a near-elephantine plate. Crab cakes, stews and sashimi rule the hours, with the favorites featuring coconut shrimp (my choice, as I couldn’t reconcile the name at first) and the TKO Taco, a mahi mahi affair that goes ideally with shredded cabbage, cheese and the house cilantro. As you might imagine, clam chowder is a staple here – and as you might not, you can get yours in an enormous bread bowl, which is exactly what it says it is. Jasmine rice, a long-grain variety that actually has an odor, comes with the coconut shrimp and is also available as a side, along with onion rings, coleslaw and seaweed salad. If you can find a more generous side portion in this city, you win the franchise that serves it. You can celebrate with one of the Fish Shop’s raft of tap beers. I chose a very light little blonde number from downtown’s Resident Brewing Co., owing to the hyperlocal angle that Fish Shop likes to project.  That idea was advanced by exceptionally pleasant manager Genevieve, who obviously mistook me for some kind of royalty. She delightedly pitched the eatery’s $1 oysters on Thursday nights, the Tecate draft specials, the kids menu and the fact that dogs are welcome on the patio if they’re cool. One guy came in with his family and a big poodle-terrier mix while I was there. The dog was an ideal guest, smiling and waving as I finished my meal; the little boy was delighted to make a new friend as I scratched him about the head. Genevieve has a culinary school background she compiled in New York, and although she’s happy to trade stories about the city that truly never sleeps, she’s also nuts about San Diego’s skies, which are ice blue about 84 percent of the year. Seattle will have to make do amid its leaden yonder – but a splendid corner eatery like Point Loma Fish Shop would certainly help. Marvelous meal. Point Loma Fish Shop WHERE: 1110 Rosecrans St. WHEN: 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. seven days. Info: 619-756-7778, thefishshoppointloma.com
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    Have you explored the top 11 hidden gems of Liberty Station?
    Feb 12, 2018 | 2984 views | 0 0 comments | 8 8 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Paige Fulfer stands next to the U.S.S. Recruit. This naval ship, located in the South Point area of the neighborhood, earned its nickname of U.S.S. Neversail because it has never seen the open seas. An exact replica of what sailors could expect out on the ocean, the vessel remained on land for military training exercises. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Paige Fulfer stands next to the U.S.S. Recruit. This naval ship, located in the South Point area of the neighborhood, earned its nickname of U.S.S. Neversail because it has never seen the open seas. An exact replica of what sailors could expect out on the ocean, the vessel remained on land for military training exercises. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    Paige Fulfer jumps next to the Hotel San Diego sign. The rooftop sign was taken down in 2005 before the downtown hotel was razed. The NTC Foundation bought the 47-by-14 foot sign and it now sits in the lawn behind Scout at Quarters D. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Paige Fulfer jumps next to the Hotel San Diego sign. The rooftop sign was taken down in 2005 before the downtown hotel was razed. The NTC Foundation bought the 47-by-14 foot sign and it now sits in the lawn behind Scout at Quarters D. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    Aerial view of Liberty Station in Point Loma.
    Aerial view of Liberty Station in Point Loma.
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    Rosy Jaurena poses in front of the 'Greetings from the U.S. Naval Training Station' postcard sign at Liberty Station. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Rosy Jaurena poses in front of the 'Greetings from the U.S. Naval Training Station' postcard sign at Liberty Station. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    Liberty Station is well-known for being a culinary and cultural hub, but did you know the neighborhood holds secrets that most locals don’t even know about? In addition to its well-known landmarks (Liberty Public Market, “Greetings from the U.S. Naval Training Station” postcard sign, The Lot) here are top 11 hidden gems of the neighborhood, reflecting its history as the former Naval Training Center:  1.) Scout at Quarters D: Now a mercantile and garden showroom, Scout at Quarters D was once housing for naval officers in the 1900s. Arthur T. Emerson Jr. was the first to make himself at home in Quarters D – he reported as commanding officer, Recruit Training Command and was known for being the youngest man in his Naval Academy class. 2.) Meaningful street names: All streets at Liberty Station are named after military heroes. For instance, Truxtun Road, one of the main roads of Liberty Station, is named after Thomas Truxtun, one of the first six commanders appointed to the new U.S. Navy by President George Washington.  3.) Holding cell: When it was a Naval Training Center, an old holding cell once stood where Liberty Station’s entrance gate is now located.  4.) Luce Auditorium: What is now the entryway for The Lot, a modern and luxury movie theatre, was once a stage for timeless icons. Opening in 1942, Luce Auditorium was the hot spot for sailors and their dates to listen to famous bands, performers and comedians. Some of the big names that have taken the stage are Nat King Cole, Bob Hope, Jack Benny and Tommy Dorsey. 5.) Movie set: When Liberty Station was a Naval Training Center, it was the set for several well-known movies including “Top Gun,” “Tars and Stripes” and “Hey Sailor.” 6.) U.S.S. Recruit: This naval ship, located in the South Point area of the neighborhood, earned its nickname of U.S.S. Neversail because it has never seen the open seas. An exact replica of what sailors could expect out on the ocean, the vessel remained on land for military training exercises.  7.) Library: The Naval Training Center’s old library is now the Corky McMillin Companies Event Center, managed by the Arts District.  8.) John and Alice Finn Plaza: John and Alice Finn Plaza was originally built in 1942 as a naval medical clinic. It was later dedicated and named after one of the first heroes of World War II and Medal of Honor recipient John W. Finn and his wife Alice. 9.) Enlisted Club: Now the location of signature restaurants like Soda & Swine and Slater’s 50/50, this area was once the Enlisted Club – built in 1941, it was the stomping grounds for sailors with a bowling alley, pool tables and a theater. 10.) Gymnasium: The Point Loma Sports Club location used to be a gymnasium utilized by the sailors. It included a basketball facility, gymnasium and fitness center. 11.) Hotel San Diego sign: The rooftop sign was taken down in 2005 before the downtown hotel was razed. The NTC Foundation bought the 47-by-14 foot sign and it now sits in the lawn behind Scout at Quarters D. The foundation is raising funds to restore the sign and use it as a centerpiece for their planned gardens. More about Liberty Station Liberty Station was built upon naval roots and was originally the Naval Training Center (NTC) that opened in 1923. NTC transitioned into Liberty Station and became a cultural hub of art, leisure and history—creating a timeless destination. Today, Liberty Station is San Diego’s signature neighborhood, inviting residents, the community and visitors to connect through events and experiences while discovering and exploring all of Liberty Station’s offerings. The neighborhood features an array of boutiques and shops, over 70 local galleries in the Arts District, and dozens of delectable dining spots. Built by design, Liberty Station creates an authentic experience—encompassing beautifully landscaped promenades, restored historic buildings that have been preserved for today’s commerce, storied corridors, historic landmarks, and spacious plazas. The historic San Diego destination is managed by the Liberty Station Community Association (LSCA), which works to maintain, beautify, promote, and develop the neighborhood.  More information about Liberty Station can be found at libertystation.com. 
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    San Diego Audubon Society, an organization dedicated to fostering the protection and appreciation of local birds, wildlife, and their habitats, recently announced Everest International Consultants ...
    Published - Friday, January 08
    full story
    Residents prefer local grocery to national chain pharmacy at Point Loma shopping center
    Mom 'n' pop or a corporate shop?   Given that choice, many Peninsulans are registering, via online petition, their preference for an independent grocer, rather than a CVS pharmacy, to move into the...
    Published - Thursday, January 07
    full story
    Flooding causes sinkhole on Avenida de la Playa in La Jolla
    Lifeguards say a section of Avenida de la Playa sank the morning of Jan. 7 due to heavy flooding in La Jolla. The roadway was reported to have dropped two feet deep, weakening underlying supports. ...
    Published - Thursday, January 07
    full story
    Local leaders share their 2016 goals and visions for the Peninsula
    The Peninsula Beacon asked prominent Peninsulans to gaze into their crystal balls and tell us what they see ahead in 2016. Here is what they said: Lorie Zapf City aide Conrad Wear said his boss, Co...
    Published - Thursday, January 07
    full story
    Residents urged to batten down property during storm
    San Diegans should clear their yards of trash, such as plastic and boxes, as a flood prevention measure now that the El Nino rains have arrived, a city spokesman said Jan. 6. City crews have worked...
    Published - Wednesday, January 06
    full story
    Week of storms continues to march across county
    Rain is expected to alternate between light and heavy in San Diego County today as the latest in a week full of storm systems moves across Southern California. The latest storm could produce small ...
    Published - Wednesday, January 06
    full story
    Current Issues(Archives)
    The Peninsula Beacon, February 15th, 2018
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    The Peninsula Beacon, February 15th, 2018
    La Jolla Village News, February 9th, 2018
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    La Jolla Village News, February 9th, 2018
    Beach & Bay Press, February 8th, 2018
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    Beach & Bay Press, February 8th, 2018
    The Peninsula Beacon, February 1st, 2018
    download The Peninsula Beacon, February 1st, 2018
    The Peninsula Beacon, February 1st, 2018