test
Sdnews rss feed
    La Jolla news and community briefs
    Nov 20, 2017 | 8510 views | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    One major benefit of calling San Diego home is the ability to catch sunsets like this one, captured recently at La Jolla Shores. La Jolla Shores is one of the countless spots to catch a proper beach sunset in the area. / PHOTO BY DON BALCH
    One major benefit of calling San Diego home is the ability to catch sunsets like this one, captured recently at La Jolla Shores. La Jolla Shores is one of the countless spots to catch a proper beach sunset in the area. / PHOTO BY DON BALCH
    slideshow
    Torrey Pines holiday culinary schedule A.R. Valentien at The Lodge at Torrey Pines Celebrate Thanksgiving at The Lodge at Torrey Pines’ signature restaurant, A.R. Valentien, and enjoy a prix fixe four-course meal featuring the tastes of the season. Indulge in fare from renowned Executive Chef Jeff Jackson in the timbered indoor-outdoor dining room overlooking the 18th hole of Torrey Pines Golf Course.                                                                                                                                                               Thursday, Nov. 23 - Lunch seating will be from noon to 4 p.m, with dinner seating from 4 to 10 p.m. Costs is $110 per person and $55 for children under 12; $130 with free-flowing sparkling wine. Advanced reservations highly recommended. For more information, visit LodgeTorreyPines.com or call 858.777.6635. The Grill at The Lodge at Torrey Pines Savor the smoky flavors of the outdoor rotisserie at The Lodge’s more casual restaurant, The Grill, on Thanksgiving. Cozy up for a three-course meal with beer or wine pairings complete with sweeping views of the iconic Torrey Pines Golf Course.  Thursday, Nov. 23 - Lunch seating will begin from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., while dinner seating will be held from 5 to 10 p.m. Cost will be $60 per person, $75 with beers, $85 with wines and $35 for children under 12 Advanced reservations highly recommended. For more information visit LodgeTorreyPines.com or call 858.777.6641/ Second Chance to host ‘Bail Me Out’ event Nov. 28 On Tuesday, Nov. 28, Sheriff William Gore, San Diego City Attorney Mara Elliott, County Supervisor Kristin Gaspar and San Diego County District Attorney Summer Stephan will volunteer to "go to jail" to help raise money to support Second Chance services. The event will be held at Palm Plaza at Westfield UTC Mall from 12:00 to 3:00 p.m. in honor of Giving Tuesday.  Proceeds will go to benefit Second Chance programs that provide employment skills and amenities to the men, women and youth who seek an opportunity to become self-sufficient. San Diegans are asked to stop by UTC and help "bail” the officials out of the "jail" by making a donation to Second Chance. Those who cannot attend can text "bailmeout" to 41444 to donate by text on #GivingTuesday, or donate online at www.secondchanceprogram.org/how-to-help/. #GivingTuesday is a global day of giving fueled by the power of social media and collaboration. Celebrated annually on the Tuesday following Thanksgiving (in the U.S.) and the widely recognized shopping events Black Friday and Cyber Monday, #GivingTuesday kicks off the charitable season, when many focus on their holiday and end-of-year giving. “Our goal is to raise $10,000 through our ‘Bail Me Out’ Giving Tuesday campaign.  The proceeds will provide job-readiness programs, sober living support, professional clothing, bus passes and job-related education to men and women throughout San Diego,” said Robert Coleman, president & CEO of Second Chance.  “We are so grateful for the generosity of all who participate in Giving Tuesday, especially our elected officials.” Participants can additionally set up their own account and become a crowd-fundraiser to be “bailed out” of “jail” by texting “bailmeout” to 71777. To additionally fundraise for Second Chance or to be a social media ambassador, please contact Maureen at mpolimadei@secondchanceprogram.org.  For more information on Second Chance, visit https://www.secondchanceprogram.org. La Valencia holiday season Enjoy a classic Christmas at the Pink Lady this season.  The landmark La Valencia Hotel is celebration central with a calendar of holiday fun built around the theme “Miracle on Prospect Street,” harkening to another holiday tradition. The season starts when millions of twinkling lights begin illuminating the sky for the hotel’s annual “Sea of Lights” on Nov. 23.  Don’t miss a community favorite – La V’s cozy Tree Lighting Ceremony on Nov. 28, complete with carolers, cocoa and crafts for the kids.  In fact, La Valencia is such an integral part of this seaside community that its long-time Managing Director, Mark Dibella, has been invited to be the Grand Marshal of La Jolla’s 60th annual Christmas Parade on Dec. 3rd.  La V is also ready to help take the stress out of your holiday feasting with specially crafted and lavish menus for Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year’s.    La Valencia is proud to be partnering with Miracle Babies this holiday season, a local charity started by Dr. Sean Daneshmand to assist families of sick newborns in their time of need. Miracle Babies will have a very special Pack ‘n’ Play set up by La V’s beautiful Christmas tree for the collection of:  diapers, wipes, socks, blankets, burp cloths, and toys for siblings. Hotel guests and local residents are invited to share the holiday spirit by donating goods to help support the mission of this San Diego based non-profit.   Nov. 23 – Annual Sea of Lights – The 6th annual Sea of Lights will be switched on to illuminate the Pink Lady from top to bottom with millions of twinkling lights, taking the enchantment of La V to magical heights. Nov. 23 – Thanksgiving buffet – From noon to 8 p.m. A culinary masterpiece to be thankful for.  Relax over a lavish Thanksgiving buffet feast at THE MED restaurant complete with all the trimmings and decadent desserts.  Café la Rue debuts a season of holiday craft cocktails and happier happy hour. $89 per adult and $39 per child (12 and under). Nov. 28 – Tree Lighting Ceremony – From 5 to 7 p.m. Join in at La V's annual holiday party in La Sala Lounge with warm holiday beverages, homemade cookies, classic carols and children's crafts.   La Jolla Country Day School Madrigal Singers at 5 pm, Countdown at 6 pm and live Entertainment to follow with Roman Palacios. Dec. 3 – La Jolla Christmas Parade – Held at 1:30 p.m. On the eve of La Valencia’s 91st anniversary, La V Managing Director, Mark Dibella, will be the proud Grand Marshal for La Jolla’s 60th annual Christmas Parade. Stepping off at 1:30 p.m. at the corner of Kline and Girard, the parade heads west with a turn down Prospect to the La Jolla Recreation Center where a fun-filled holiday festival keeps the magic going.  Dec. 24 and 25 - Sunday, from 5:30 to 9 p.m. and Monday, from noon to 8 p.m. Gather at THE MED and indulge in four delightful & decedent holiday courses crafted by Executive Chef Alex Emery and garnished with ocean vistas, seasonal music, and sweet treats. $95 per adult $49 per child. Dec. 31 – Starts at 5:30 p.m. Ring in the New Year at THE MED with an unforgettable five-course over-the-top dining experience followed by a countdown celebration in La Sala Lounge and live entertainment. $150 per adult. Jan 1 – 10:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Join to kick off 2018 at our award-winning New Year's Day brunch at THE MED featuring recovery cocktails and resolution specials. A la carte menu items starting at $16. Casual dining offered in Café la Rue. To book rooms or holiday events please call: 858-424-0771 or book your restaurant reservations on Open Table at bit.ly/THEMED. Little Mensches beach clean up a success Thanks to everyone who participated in the beach clean up, organized in cooperation with San Diego Coastkeeper.  Approximately 70 children/participants collected just under 50 pounds of trash off of the La Jolla Shores beach and park.  They will not be holding an event in December, but hope that you will join for their next event on Jan. 7, 2018, which will run in partnership with the amazing Challenged Athletes Foundation.  
    Comments
    (0)
    Comments-icon Post a Comment
    No Comments Yet
    La Jolla church ends bi-weekly dinner for the needy
    by BLAKE BUNCH
    Nov 17, 2017 | 8412 views | 0 0 comments | 9 9 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Mary, Star of the Sea, the Roman Catholic church in La Jolla that has ended its charitable meal program. Prior to the program’s cessation. So Others May Eat held dinners twice a month for more than nine years./ PHOTO BY BLAKE BUNCH
    Mary, Star of the Sea, the Roman Catholic church in La Jolla that has ended its charitable meal program. Prior to the program’s cessation. So Others May Eat held dinners twice a month for more than nine years./ PHOTO BY BLAKE BUNCH
    slideshow
    The recent hepatitis A outbreak in San Diego, which has killed 20 people to date, prompted city officials to finally address the growing issue of homelessness. Their solution, however temporary, was to install hand-washing stations at homeless “hot spots,” pressure wash the sidewalks in said areas with a bleaching solution and create a tent city far enough removed from the outbreak epicenter, yet right in some residents’ backyards. While the city is busy “fighting” the issue of homelessness, a seemingly unforeseen event occurred a good distance away from the outbreak’s reach along the coast. Citing the hepatitis A outbreak and ongoing renovations, Mary, Star of the Sea, a Catholic church in La Jolla, decided to abruptly halt a charitable program that has consistently fed the needy for more than nine years. Through the program, So Others May Eat, meals that were provided every second Tuesday of each month will no longer be served at the church. So Others May Eat alternates weekly, providing meals to the less fortunate at Sacred Heart Church in Ocean Beach and Mary, Star of the Sea. Tresha Souza, the founder of So Others May Eat, says that she is appalled at the church’s decision to willingly neglect those in need. “What many people would not realize is that at least 60 percent of people who attended our meals could be classified as ‘working poor,’ for they lived in their own homes,” said Souza. “In most instances, they were often families that counted on these bi-weekly meals for sustenance. Honestly, I just think that it is utter hypocrisy – to hide behind the hepatitis A outbreak and deny one’s fellow man aid. I can’t believe the church didn’t stand up for what is right.” Unfortunately, the homelessness issue in coastal San Diego communities has become an exponentially polarizing issue. The Beach and Bay Press recently reported that a Pacific Beach resident, Matthew Phillips, started a petition on Change.org to end homeless “feeds” at PB churches. Phillips brought the issue before PB Town Council as well. The petition cited the amount of petty theft, violent crime, severe mental illness, drug and alcohol abuse and a generally apathetic nature of the homeless as reasoning to end the feeds. If it sounds like tough love, it is. Not surprisingly, some citizens are outraged at this notion – almsgiving being a major tenant of the Christian faith – while there are those who support the issue outright. While the La Jolla Village News reached out to Mary, Star of the Sea for comment, none was returned. The Catholic Diocese did issue the following statement, however:  “We’re sorry for any misunderstandings that have arisen regarding the ‘So Others May Eat’ dinners that used to take place at Mary Star of the Sea.  A major renovation forced us to close our parish hall for the past several months and we have had to redirect where and how we do our part to serve the less fortunate in our parish. We have not, and will never, turn our backs on the poor. As a parish, we will respond to the needs of our community; we will overcome the challenges posed by the hepatitis outbreak and we will continue to provide assistance to the homeless people and families who need our help and our prayers.” 
    Comments
    (0)
    Comments-icon Post a Comment
    No Comments Yet
    Groundswell Community Project empowers women in waves
    by Mathilde Rousseau Bjerregaard
    Nov 10, 2017 | 26664 views | 0 0 comments | 12 12 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Groundswell Community Project founder Natalie Small leads a group of women through surf therapy at Dog Beach in Ocean Beach. / PHOTO CONTRIBUTED
    Groundswell Community Project founder Natalie Small leads a group of women through surf therapy at Dog Beach in Ocean Beach. / PHOTO CONTRIBUTED
    slideshow
    Natalie Small (second from right) with a group from Groundswell Community Project.
    Natalie Small (second from right) with a group from Groundswell Community Project.
    slideshow
    Groundswell Community Project is a San Diego-based nonprofit organization that builds safe and brave spaces for women to heal, empower, and unite through the art of surfing. Our mission at Groundswell Community Project is to let the ocean be a space for women who are overcoming personal problems to heal and to give them the opportunity to explore their own strengths,” said Natalie Small, the founder and facilitator of Groundswell Community Project. The organization provides four- and eight-week programs for individuals and groups to engage and expand themselves through surf therapy. The programs create safe spaces for self expression, exploration, and healing for self and the community. “I wanted to give women an opportunity to get together and be able to be children again playing and exploring their strengths. As adult women, we don’t really get to play and playing is really important,” said Small. Small is a state-licensed marriage and family therapist and she works at a private practice for individuals, families, and couples using experiential therapies to help empower them to overcome mental disabilities like anxiety and depression. She is also a first aid arts facilitator, trained in how art can be a tool to overcome trauma and its triggers. Six years ago, Small combined her passions and therapist skills into the Groundswell Community Project. She wanted to take her training and experience in therapy to the ocean and let the ocean be the venue for healing. “I just see an instant transformation that occurs when the women get into the ocean and reconnect with their bodies in a positive way. It breaks down the barrier and the judgment that we hold against ourselves and each other, and just lets us be free to connect with our soul,” said Small. The Groundswell Community Project helps women who have been victims of sex trafficking, and who are overcoming addictions, abuse and depression. The project’s mission is to be a creative community that allows women to embrace healing and empowerment, through bold and beautiful engagement with each other, the outdoors and the arts. To join the team, and become a surf sister, visit groundswellcommunity.org.
    Comments
    (0)
    Comments-icon Post a Comment
    No Comments Yet
    Día de los Muertos brings Mexico City back to life
    by THOMAS MELVILLE
    Nov 06, 2017 | 26363 views | 1 1 comments | 11 11 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    slideshow
    Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City paid tribute to the earthquake victims and first responders with a giant fist sculpture made out of multi-colored hard hats, pickaxes and rubble on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City paid tribute to the earthquake victims and first responders with a giant fist sculpture made out of multi-colored hard hats, pickaxes and rubble on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    slideshow
    Thousands watched the Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Thousands watched the Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    slideshow
    The Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    The Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    slideshow
    The Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    The Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    slideshow
    The Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    The Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    slideshow
    The Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    The Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    slideshow
    The Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    The Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    slideshow
    The Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    The Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    slideshow
    The Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    The Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    slideshow
    The Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    The Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    slideshow
    The Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    The Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    slideshow
    The Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    The Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    slideshow
    The faces at the Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    The faces at the Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    slideshow
    The faces at the Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    The faces at the Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    slideshow
    The faces at the Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    The faces at the Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    slideshow
    The faces at the Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    The faces at the Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    slideshow
    The faces at the Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    The faces at the Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    slideshow
    The faces at the Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    The faces at the Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    slideshow
    The faces at the Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    The faces at the Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    slideshow
    The faces at the Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    The faces at the Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City on Saturday, Oct. 28. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    slideshow
    The popular trajinera boats in Xochimilco. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    The popular trajinera boats in Xochimilco. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    slideshow
    A colorful Catrina in the Zócalo. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    A colorful Catrina in the Zócalo. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    slideshow
    Colorfully painted skulls lined Paseo de la Reforma during October to help promote the Día de los Muertos parade. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Colorfully painted skulls lined Paseo de la Reforma during October to help promote the Día de los Muertos parade. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    slideshow
    Rubble left over from the earthquake still lines the sidewalks in Xochimilco, a gritty neighborhood in southern Mexico City. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Rubble left over from the earthquake still lines the sidewalks in Xochimilco, a gritty neighborhood in southern Mexico City. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    slideshow
    Mercado Roma, with its orange and black tiled floor and bright angular countertops, was open and doing brisk business serving a variety of local favorites. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Mercado Roma, with its orange and black tiled floor and bright angular countertops, was open and doing brisk business serving a variety of local favorites. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    slideshow
    The Zócalo, which is bordered by the Cathedral to the north, the National Palace to the east, the Federal District buildings to the south and the Old Portal de Mercaderes to the west, the Nacional Monte de Piedad building at the north-west corner, with the Templo Mayor site to the northeast, the morning of the parade. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    The Zócalo, which is bordered by the Cathedral to the north, the National Palace to the east, the Federal District buildings to the south and the Old Portal de Mercaderes to the west, the Nacional Monte de Piedad building at the north-west corner, with the Templo Mayor site to the northeast, the morning of the parade. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    slideshow
    (San Diego Community Newspaper Group managing editor Thomas Melville traveled to Mexico City to see how the area was recovering from the devastating earthquakes and to experience the huge Día de los Muertos celebration and parade.) As a show of strength, unity and resiliency, thousands of onlookers raised their hands, mirroring the first responders who were walking behind the first Día de los Muertos parade float to arrive at the overpacked Zócalo – a giant fist made out of multi-colored hard hats, pickaxes and rubble. As the sculpture stopped in front of the Cathedral, the first responders formed their hands into fist, and the voices of Mexico roared. The second annual Day of the Dead celebration came at the right time for this bustling, yet damaged city. On Sept. 7, an 8.2 magnitude earthquake shook the region, razed buildings, and killed more than 200 people in the city. Since then, recovery has been slow and the citizenry a little timid. The parade on Saturday, Oct. 28, which brought out more than 300,000 people along a lengthy route that began on Paseo de la Reforma and snaked through Centro Histórico, paid tribute to the earthquake victims, helpers and heroes – and could be a major step to help heal the city. “It was kind of weird to do this happy celebration after this tragedy,” said Paola Schlaepfer, executive producer at Callejón Salao, which produced part of the parade. “We had been preparing for six months, then stopped after the earthquake, and thought about what we could do to pay homage to the dead, and all the people who were helping and working to rescue people. “We wanted to acknowledge them at the beginning of the parade,” she said. “And then the parade will continue – and so will the city.” Roma Norte Some areas of the city, such as Centro Histórico, are back to normal, with sidewalks filled with people motivated to sell goods, services and snacks to passersby. The Metro is still jammed with commuters who have no problem elbowing their way into and out of subway cars. But in the Roma Norte district, which was hit particularly hard during the earthquake, severely damaged buildings are roped off, and backhoes are still clearing piles of rubble that line sidewalks. “There are areas of the city that used to be very crowded and full of life that are not anymore,” Schlaepfer said. “But they are starting to recover very slowly. People are still a little afraid to go to the areas that were hit hard, like Roma Norte. The businesses and restaurants there are restarting but it is a slow process.” Mercado Roma, with its orange and black tiled floor and bright angular countertops, was open and doing brisk business serving a variety of local favorites, along with Asian barbecue and Mediterranean seafood options. But a few blocks west, in the grassy square of an intersection, a church group was giving out clothes to needy people from a makeshift tent. Overlooking them was the mural of Frida, the rescue dog, that Ocean Beach artist Celeste Byers painted a few weeks ago as a symbol of hope. Xochimilco In Xochimilco, a gritty neighborhood in southern Mexico City, which relies on the tourist trade of its popular trajinera boats that float lovers and partiers down its famous canals, things have been quiet since Sept. 7. After a video went viral of the boats being sloshed around the canals by waves generated from the earthquake, accompanied by screams of some tourists, business slowed considerably. One of the long-time tourist guides said people are not visiting the canals like they used to because they are afraid. He gestured with his arms, shrugged his shoulders and rubbed his cropped white beard while shaking his head back and forth. On that weekday afternoon in late October, the place had only a few visitors. Workers were repairing the roofs of the shops that line the canal, boat owners were repainting the colorful signs and names of their trajineras, which mostly sat idle in the water. “The people are waiting to see what will happen,” Schlaepfer said. “But we need to reactivate those areas that were affected. We have to move on.” Parade It’s odd that James Bond has a role here. But the 2015 film “Spectre” started with an intense chase scene set in the Zócalo during a huge Día de los Muertos parade. That parade was just a fabrication for the movie. The long-time celebration usually included just a small parade of Catrinas. But the movie version was what the tourists wanted to see and the city leaders decided to capitalize on that opportunity. In 2016, they staged the inaugural Día de los Muertos parade, which some Mexicans criticized as too crass and commercial, but more than 200,000 cheered it on, and so a sequel was planned. “The parade last year was a great success. It has became a new tradition for the city,” Schlaepfer said. This year’s version was extraordinary, with 50 foot tall skeletons and giant skulls bobbing along the route, interlaced by hundreds of dancing Catrinas and howling Aztecs. The Zócalo was overflowing with people cheering on the parade, checking out the huge Día de los Muertos alters, and taking selfies with the hundreds of Catrinas with their uniquely colorful painted faces – their take on the traditional “dapper skeleton.” “The people of this city deserve some happiness,” Schlaepfer said. “We want to bring back smiles on the faces of the people.” Even if on this day of the dead, those smiles were painted on.
    Comments
    (1)
    Comments-icon Post a Comment
    beach&baypress
    |
    November 09, 2017
    Wow. Great article and photos!
    La Jolla news and community briefs
    Nov 03, 2017 | 9661 views | 0 0 comments | 23 23 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    On Friday, Oct. 27 at Tioga Hall, UC San Diego saw its 43rd annual ‘Pumpkin Drop.’ This year’s pumpkin weighed about 420 pounds, making it one of the largest pumpkins in Muir College’s Pumpkin Drop history, which is fitting, as the college is celebrating its 50th anniversary. Each year, students name the sacrificial squash and this fall it was dubbed: ‘I’m dropping hints that I’m 50 and single!’ Inside the pumpkin was an assortment of individually wrapped candy, which students scurried to claim. / PHOTO BY ERIK JEPSEN UC SAN DIEGO PUBLICATIONS AND CREATIVE SERVICES
    On Friday, Oct. 27 at Tioga Hall, UC San Diego saw its 43rd annual ‘Pumpkin Drop.’ This year’s pumpkin weighed about 420 pounds, making it one of the largest pumpkins in Muir College’s Pumpkin Drop history, which is fitting, as the college is celebrating its 50th anniversary. Each year, students name the sacrificial squash and this fall it was dubbed: ‘I’m dropping hints that I’m 50 and single!’ Inside the pumpkin was an assortment of individually wrapped candy, which students scurried to claim. / PHOTO BY ERIK JEPSEN UC SAN DIEGO PUBLICATIONS AND CREATIVE SERVICES
    slideshow
    Vikings for Veterans at LJHS track On Nov. 5, help the LJHS Vikings For Vets club support local veterans by running or walking in this 5K fundraiser event. All donations go to Paralyzed Veterans of America. A suggested donation of $10 per youth and $15 per adult can be paid on race day. For more information, visit www.vikingsforvets.org. ‘Natural High’ gala America is facing an opioid epidemic and it is not going away without a fight. Today, nearly two million Americans live with opioid abuse or dependence; an estimated 46 Americans die each day from prescription opioid overdoses alone. Opioids have become more readily available and drug and alcohol use is more prevalent than in years past, impacting today’s youth the greatest.  On Saturday, Nov. 4, San Diego-based Natural High works directly with educators, celebrity ambassadors and parents to inspire and empower our youth to find their natural high and develop the skills and courage to say no to drugs. Natural High, a nonprofit organization, uses science-based programs to inspire today’s youth to tap into their natural high and learn lifesaving principles. Natural High has inspired more than eight million teens and currently reaches more than 28,000 educators across the nation. To recognize national advocates and ambassadors, Natural High will honor special educators, celebrity ambassadors, and youths at its annual, celebrity-studded Gala on Nov. 4 at Hilton Torrey Pines. 6:30 to 10 p.m. MTS to improve transit choices The San Diego Metropolitan Transit System (MTS) continues its efforts to improve transit choices for the San Diego region with the grand opening of the state-of-the-art 80,000-square-foot UTC Transit Center on Friday, Oct. 27.  The agency will operate 11 bus routes out of the facility that service thousands of passengers daily in the heart of San Diego’s second largest business sector – University City.   The UTC Transit Center is part of the $500 million Westfield UTC mall renovation that will connect to the Mid-Coast Trolley extension platform via a sky bridge when completed in 2021. The $13.7 million transit facility was built as a public/private partnership with the San Diego Association of Governments (SANDAG) and Westfield UTC and the City of San Diego.   Since June 2014, MTS, in partnership with SANDAG, has exponentially improved San Diego’s largest transit system – giving more and better choices than ever before to transit riders. Other capital investments include: · $2 million boost in bus service as part of the Transit Optimization Plan that will add to the agency’s high frequency network and streamline routes to reduce travel times; · $660 million complete overhaul and renewal of the Orange Line and UC San Diego Blue Line infrastructure; · Launched a new network of high frequency, limited stop bus service called Rapid   · Modernized the UC San Diego Blue Line to allow low-floor Trolley cars to speed up boarding and improve on-time performance on the network’s busiest line · $38 million to build the East County Bus Operations & Maintenance Facility  · $50.9 million to build the South Bay Operations & Maintenance Facility; and · $21 million to modernize bus stations on the Broadway corridor in downtown San Diego that provide a premier level of comfort, security and convenience for transit riders. The latest investment, the UTC Transit Center, will serve bus routes that have grown significantly in recent years due to increased demand from UC San Diego’s growing community. The new 80,000-square-foottransit center will be off-street, have a bus-only entrance/exit, and avoid all the pedestrian and private auto flow from the mall. It will also include a new controlled bus-only intersection at the southwestern corner of the transit center on Genesee Avenue. Bus routes that will serve the new UTC Transit Center include: · Route 30 (UTC/VA Medical Center/Downtown San Diego); · Route 31 (Miramar College Transit Station/UTC Transit Center); · Route 41 (UC San Diego/VA Medical Center/Fashion Valley Transit Center); · Route 50  (UTC Express – Downtown Express); Route 60 (UTC via Kearny Mesa/Euclid Ave Trolley Station via Kearny Mesa) · Route 101 (NCTD Route – Oceanside/VA Medical Center/UC San Diego/UTC); · Route 105 (Old Town Transit Center/UTC); · Route 150 (UTC/VA Medical Center/Downtown San Diego); · Route 201/202 (UC San Diego Medical Center/UC San Diego/Nobel/UTC); · Route 204 (UTC/Executive Dr./Judicial Dr./UTC; · Route 921 (Miramar College Transit Station/UC San Diego/VA Medical Center). UC San Diego named 16th Best University The University of California San Diego has been named the world’s 16th best university by U.S. News and World Report. The campus was also recognized as the nation’s fifth-best public university in the fourth annual rankings, which measure factors such as research, global and regional reputation; international collaboration; as well as the number of highly-cited papers and doctorates awarded. “UC San Diego is proud to receive this recognition and to have the academic achievements of our faculty and students commended by U.S News and World Report,” said Chancellor Pradeep K. Khosla. “As a top-ranked public research university, UC San Diego advances the frontiers of knowledge to find innovative, non-conventional solutions to global challenges and make the world a better place.” The overall rankings evaluate 1,250 universities – up from 1,000 last year – across 74 countries. “The schools that rank the highest in the Best Global Universities rankings are those that emphasize academic research, including by partnering with international scholars to produce highly cited articles,” said Robert Morse, chief data strategist at U.S. News and World Report. “This is different from the Best Colleges rankings, which measure the overall quality of undergraduate institutions.” The university’s cutting-edge research and stellar faculty are known throughout the world. Recently, computer science professor Stefan Savage was named a 2017 MacArthur Fellow for his work in cybersecurity. Stephen Mayfield, a UC San Diego professor of biology, led a research effort which produced the world’s first algae-based, renewable flip flops, an innovation that could be revolutionary, changing the world for the better environmentally. The U.S. News Best Global Universities 2018 edition also features subject rankings in which UC San Diego received high marks across the board in areas such as pharmacology and toxicology (3), neuroscience and behavior (8), biology and biochemistry (8), molecular biology and genetics (10) as well as psychiatry and psychology (13).  Vision Zero Bicycle lanes will soon be installed on Vision Zero corridor University Avenue from 5th Avenue to Park Boulevard.  On Oct. 31, San Diego City Council unanimously approved a plan to remove metered parking in order to add the bicycle lanes, making University Avenue safer for all modes of transportation.  In 2015, SANDAG approved of the Uptown Bikeways project, which will bring protected bikeways to University Avenue, however, a gap was created in the core of Hillcrest to mollify opposition in the neighborhood. Today’s action and leadership is a major step by the City of San Diego in filling the bicycle lane gap in the Hillcrest core and will save lives on one of the most dangerous corridors in San Diego.  Circulate San Diego and a diverse coalition of 20 organizations promoted a campaign for the last two years called Vision Zero, with the goal to end traffic deaths and serious injuries in San Diego by 2025. Mayor Faulconer and the San Diego City Council adopted a 10-year Vision Zero strategy in 2015. “Today’s vote to shorten the gap on University is a key step toward improving safety on one of San Diego’s most dangerous Vision Zero corridors,” said Maya Rosas, Advocacy Manager with Circulate San Diego. The concept behind Vision Zero is that traffic deaths are preventable – through safe street design, education, and enforcement. The program has been successful in other U.S. and European cities. To date, 20 cities across the U.S. have adopted a Vision Zero goal. 
    Comments
    (0)
    Comments-icon Post a Comment
    No Comments Yet
    News
    City's financial health remarkably better over past decade, performance audit says
    The City of San Diego’s financial health has shown “remarkable improvement” over the past decade due to fiscal reforms and now ranks among the best when compared with other cities with similar popu...
    Published - Thursday, August 06
    full story
    Does the Point Loma pipeline project make sense?
    Point Loman Jim Gilhooly is on a mission to “redirect” the Navy away from its plan to relocate a section of its 17.3-mile fuel pipeline between Naval Base Point Loma and Marine Corps Air Station Mi...
    Published - Wednesday, August 05
    full story
    Annual Ron Trenton Memorial Lifeguard Relays in OB
    The San Diego Lifeguards will be exhibiting their rescue skills at an upcoming spirited competition event that is open to the public 6 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 6 at Ocean Beach (just north of the OB Pie...
    Published - Wednesday, August 05
    full story
    Man pleads guilty in La Jolla Country Day bomb threat
    San Diego County District Attorney Bonnie Dumanis announced Aug. 4 that William John Cooper has pleaded guilty in the United Kingdom to three counts of harassment and one count of violating a restr...
    Published - Wednesday, August 05
    full story
    Ocean Beach Town Council elections begin in late August
    Voting is scheduled to begin Friday, Aug. 28 to fill eight seats on the Ocean Beach Town Council, which provides community issue discussion forums, promotes the neighborhood's betterment and beauti...
    Published - Tuesday, August 04
    full story
    San Diego among 15 counties declared disaster areas amid wildfires
    San Diego and 14 other counties in California were declared disaster areas Aug. 3 by Gov. Jerry Brown because of a series of wildfires that have burned thousands of acres. The declaration will help...
    Published - Monday, August 03
    full story
    Man charged in hit and run in La Jolla crosswalk
    A 60-year-old man was arrested on a felony hit-and-run charge after his vehicle struck a female pedestrian in La Jolla Aug. 1. The 77-year-old victim was hospitalized with a broken pelvis, accordin...
    Published - Monday, August 03
    full story
    Man's best friend probably came over from France
    (Editor's note: This is the third of three articles on Martin Jones Westlin's summer vacation in southwest France, during which he discovered some of the culture's lesser-publicized traits through ...
    Published - Sunday, August 02
    full story
    Mission Bay meth man given three years in jail
    The former owner of the Mission Bay Sportcenter was sentenced Wednesday(July 29) to three years in jail for running a methamphetamine ring out of the lockers of the building. Jason Morgan Boone, 42...
    Published - Saturday, August 01
    full story
    Sarah Renee shares her 'special gift' to help others heal
    For someone who’s hung their shingle out as a psychic “medium,” Sarah Renee is surprisingly “earthbound.” Seances aren’t her thing. She freely admits to “quacks” in her field. And she only charges ...
    Published - Friday, July 31
    full story
    A prince, princess and celebs walk the red carpet at annual La Jolla International Fashion Film Festival
    The sixth annual La Jolla International Fashion Film Festival burst on the scene July 24-25 at the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego. Stylish people flew in from around the world for this fashio...
    Published - Friday, July 31
    full story
    La Jolla Recreation Center celebrates 100 years
    La Jolla Recreation Center marked its 100th anniversary with proclamations, plaques and kudos bestowed by public officials and longtime facility users at a Saturday, July 25 rededication ceremony. ...
    Published - Friday, July 31
    full story
    Time is now to start planning Mission Bay Gateway Project
    
Pacific Beach Town Council (PBTC) was told in July they and the entire community ought to begin planning immediately for the Mission Bay Gateway Project, now that the De Anza Cove lawsuit has fina...
    Published - Friday, July 31
    full story
    Should there be a second holiday parade in La Jolla?
    Would a parade by another name still be as contentious? Probably not. But for a second month in a row, the La Jolla Traffic and Transportation (T&T) Board in July postponed final action on an appli...
    Published - Friday, July 31
    full story
    Current Issues(Archives)
    La Jolla Village News, November 17th, 2017
    download La Jolla Village News, November 17th, 2017
    La Jolla Village News, November 17th, 2017
    Beach & Bay Press, November 16th, 2017
    download Beach & Bay Press, November 16th, 2017
    Beach & Bay Press, November 16th, 2017
    The Peninsula Beacon, November 9th, 2017
    download The Peninsula Beacon, November 9th, 2017
    The Peninsula Beacon, November 9th, 2017
    La Jolla Village News, November 3rd, 2017
    download La Jolla Village News, November 3rd, 2017
    La Jolla Village News, November 3rd, 2017