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    New sculpture at UC San Diego pays homage to first instant message
    Dec 01, 2018 | 29834 views | 0 0 comments | 16 16 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Perched high atop an industrial pole at Urey Plaza in Revelle College, a lamp blinks silently, fast and slow. The sculpture continuously signals in Morse code, transmitting the first message ever sent by electric telegraph: ‘What Hath God Wrought.’
    Perched high atop an industrial pole at Urey Plaza in Revelle College, a lamp blinks silently, fast and slow. The sculpture continuously signals in Morse code, transmitting the first message ever sent by electric telegraph: ‘What Hath God Wrought.’
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    At 195-feet-tall, it is the tallest structure on campus. Contemporary artist Mark Bradford’s new sculpture is a monumental ode to the origins of today’s lightning-speed communications. It is the 20th addition to UC San Diego’s renowned Stuart Collection, a unique collection of site-specific works by leading artists of our time. His work is soon to be followed by two more pieces, including a mural by Alexis Smith and a sensory environment by Ann Hamilton. New sculpture Bradford’s conspicuous work stands prominently in Urey Plaza in Revelle College. Perched high atop an industrial pole, a lamp blinks silently, fast and slow. The sculpture continuously signals in Morse code, transmitting the first message ever sent by electric telegraph: “What Hath God Wrought.” The experiment was led by Samuel Morse and his partner Alfred Vail in 1844 and marked an important step in launching our nation’s communication network. The sculpture, titled What Hath God Wrought, is intended to reflect on the powerful influence of technology while silently referencing impending change. Mark Bradford “Mark is a crusader for social change while at the same time being one of the most successful painters of his generation,” said director of the Stuart Collection Mary Beebe, who first invited Bradford to consider creating a work for the campus in 1995. “At first he wasn’t interested in doing a permanent work. I’d call him every few years, and finally he said, ‘I like your persistence and I like what you’ve been doing.’” Bradford visited UC San Diego in May 2013 to discuss possibilities. Meandering the campus with Stuart Collection project director Mathieu Gregoire and Revelle College Provost Paul Yu, they made an exciting discovery. In the plaza adjacent to Urey Hall, they uncovered a forgotten plaque. It marked the spot where, in 1961, leaders of the newly founded university dedicated the site where construction broke ground. It was a fortuitous sign that Bradford’s retrospective work should reside where UC San Diego’s story began. The luminaire that crowns the work harkens to a time long past, but one that is inextricably tied to the instant messages that pervade our lives today. Fabricated by the Marine Sciences Development Center at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, the lamp’s 300 LEDs can be adjusted for intensity and color, shining brighter on sunny days and dimmer at night. Bradford was born in Los Angeles and is known for producing large-scale, abstract paintings and collages made from leftover artifacts from city spaces. He builds up layers of found materials, then cuts away at them, revealing a kind of map of urban life, networks and relationships. In 2009, he was awarded a MacArthur Fellowship, followed by a National Medal of Arts in 2015. Two years later, Bradford was selected to represent the United States at the Venice Biennale, a prestigious international art exhibition. New mural Bradford’s sculpture is one of three new pieces planned for the ever-expanding Stuart Collection. A 20 by 60-foot mural by artist Alexis Smith will be displayed in the North Torrey Pines Living and Learning Neighborhood when it is completed in 2020. The painting, titled “Same Old Paradise,” served as the inspiration for Smith’s “Snake Path,” the sinuous trail that connects Warren Mall to Geisel Library. The idea for the mural came to Smith in a dream she had while visiting San Diego over three decades ago. She describes the work as a “distilled vision of the promise of the open road and a fruitful land most commonly referred to as the American dream.” Below the metamorphosing snake, eight panels feature souvenirs representing an American road trip, along with an eight-sentence recap of Jack Kerouac’s novel “On the Road,” which served as inspiration for the painting. The passageway On the east side of campus, another work is distilling. Massive trackways are taking shape on the periphery of campus in preparation for the trolley arrival. The movement of people and the opportunity to create an immersive sensory space piqued the interest of artist Ann Hamilton. She visited the campus in 2013 to talk about a proposal that involves a series of swings that will hang from the Pepper Canyon transit station trestle as well as a 400-foot embossed pathway that leads into the heart of the university. The passageway is envisioned as a concordance featuring hundreds of quotations from faculty members and other notable figures connected to the campus such as Thurgood Marshall and Eleanor Roosevelt. Running down the middle are intersections that the passages share. The work, still in development, will be the collection’s 22nd installation. All pieces in the Stuart Collection are site-specific, permanently built into the university’s landscape and architecture. Each sculpture is funded by private donations and must be approved by an advisory board — comprised of museum directors, artists, educators and community members — as well as the Chancellor’s Office. The process can take years, but the product is often notoriously bold. See the sculptures Want to see the sculptures? Visit stuartcollection.ucsd.edu to learn more about each artist and work, and download a map for a self-guided tour. The Stuart Collection relies on philanthropy to bring new sculptures to life. To learn more about how to help support, contact Mary Beebe at mbeebe@ucsd.edu or call 858-534-2117. What Hath God Wrought What: The campus and local community are invited to learn more about the piece from contemporary artist Mark Bradford, who will speak at Galbraith Hall. When: 6 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 1.
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    La Jolla looking for park land – residents suggest parklets and view corridors for more open space
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Nov 29, 2018 | 16534 views | 0 0 comments | 22 22 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Hikers look south to La Jolla Cove from a lookout on one of the trails at Torrey Pines State Reserve. / THOMAS MELVILLE / LA JOLLA VILLAGE NEWS
    Hikers look south to La Jolla Cove from a lookout on one of the trails at Torrey Pines State Reserve. / THOMAS MELVILLE / LA JOLLA VILLAGE NEWS
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    The public perception is that much of La Jolla’s public park space lies underwater. That point was debated at length at a recent La Jolla Parks and Beaches meeting where City park staffers discussed an ongoing update to the citywide parks master plan, which includes La Jolla. The City got an outpouring of ideas and opinions from La Jollans arguing their community is decidedly “under parked” with its above-ground parks and open spaces. LJPB planners have long held that much of the community’s available park space is in the submerged, 6,000-acre San Diego-La Jolla Underwater Park between Torrey Pines State Reserve and La Jolla Cove.  On Oct. 22, Meredith Dawson, Shannon Scoggins and Rosalia Castruita representing the City’s Parks and Recreation Department invited residents to share their views on the quality of La Jolla’s existing park space, vetting where more space could possibly be found. “The City’s parks master plan has not been done since 1956 and we’re now laying out a new plan,” said Dawson. “We’re meeting with stakeholder groups who are invested in local neighborhood parks.” “Park advocates are key stakeholders,” Scoggins told LJPB’s board, adding the objective is to “create a roadmap” guiding parks master-plan revision. Scoggins said the City wants to standardize its definition of what a park is, as well as make parks more publicly accessible. “We want people to live a minimum of a 10-minute walk and 20-minute bike ride from meaningful open space,” Scoggins said. An audience member replied those time intervals might be excessively long for moms with strollers or seniors, adding the City needs to consider the multi-generational needs of park users. Resident Gail Forbes inquired if the San Diego Unified School District had been approached about sharing school recreational spaces. Scoggins replied that, with today’s heightened school security, it has become increasingly difficult for the public to use school space without shared-use agreements. “We are the most under parked community in San Diego,” contended LJPB board member Melinda Merryweather. “We need to come up with some more land.” Merryweather suggested Pottery Canyon, a designated City historical site off Torrey Pines Road, would be ideal for a picnic park. LJPB board member Patrick Ahern said pocket parks and view corridors shouldn’t be overlooked. The Cove’s Coast Walk trail ought to be considered for park space, argued one audience member, to which another replied, “That trail is a dedicated street. The homeowners own the land so it can’t become a park.” Another resident argued La Jolla needs more off-leash dog space, complaining popular Capehart dog park on Mount Soledad is inadequate. Bird Rock resident Sharon Wampler noted the city ought to take a closer look at parklets and remnant lots in its quest to find more park space. Architectural historian Diane Kane said the city ought to consider the historical and cultural resources of parks in its parks master-plan update. “That is what we want to hear,” said Dawson in response to the public’s comments. “We’re going to be fleshing out trends coming from these listening sessions.” LJPB board member Phyllis Minick asked why the abandoned De Anza Mobile Park site isn’t being considered for park space. She was told that site’s future is being debated in the City’s ongoing De Anza Revitalization Plan. One proposal calls for the former mobile home park to be turned into shorefront camping. How much park space is in La Jolla? Addressing the actual amount of public park space in La Jolla, and whether or not any of it is underwater, the City confirmed the community is “under parked,” but said none of its calculated park space is inundated. “Population-based park acreage requirements come from the Recreation Element of the City’s General Plan and are generally made up of community parks, neighborhood parks, mini parks and joint-use areas,” said City spokesperson Tim Graham. “We are to provide 2.8 acres of usable parkland per 1,000 residents.” Noting useable parkland is generally flat enough for recreational use, Graham said, “In 2106 La Jolla was determined to be 30.51 acres in deficit of useable parkland, and are projected to be 37.66 acres short in 2035.” Graham said La Jolla is a little unusual in that, “There are areas along the coast, such as south of Children’s Pool, that appear to be parkland,” while adding, “But they are actually street right-of-way. Those types of areas are not included in the calculations because they are not designated parks.” Added Graham, “Then you have Charlotte Park, which is nothing more than a rocky beach that can only be accessed from the ocean except maybe in an extremely low tide.” Graham said Charlotte Park was likely donated to the City many years ago, and was probably designated as a park because, “There wasn’t any other category it would fit into.” “The San Diego La Jolla Underwater Park is counted toward the City’s overall park acreage, but not towards La Jolla’s population-based park needs,” said Graham, pointing out the underwater park is considered more as a regional park because it attracts people from all over, not primarily La Jolla.
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    Celebration for renovated Children’s Pool Plaza set for Dec. 9
    Nov 29, 2018 | 1192 views | 0 0 comments | 22 22 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    New Children’s Pool Plaza is nearly complete.  SUZANNE WEINER / LA JOLLA VILLAGE NEWS
    New Children’s Pool Plaza is nearly complete. SUZANNE WEINER / LA JOLLA VILLAGE NEWS
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    After eight years, the Children’s Pool Plaza project has come to fruition – and those responsible are throwing a wing ding to celebrate.On Sunday, Dec. 9, La Jolla Parks and Beaches and Casa de Mañana are co-hosting a celebration unveiling the new plaza. The community celebration, unveiling plaza improvements in the 800 block of Coast Boulevard, will include music by broadcaster Ron Jones, the “Voice of La Jolla,” along with a display by youth services La Jolla librarian Angie Stava with an on-site book check out. There will also be a photo stand (boy and girl surfers with face space) for photos as well as free sugar-free Zollipops and an ice cream truck.  Spearheading the project was Phyllis Minick, a community activist and La Jolla Parks and Beaches member, who discussed what prompted to her take action. “What it really was was just huge crowds, not only along the sidewalk but out in the street, strollers with babies and bicycles and cars pulling in and out,” said Minick. “At the time, the sidewalk in many places was only about 18-inches, and now in some places that’s been widened to eight feet. It was dangerous (then) and ugly.” Walkway improvements envisioned a vastly improved pedestrian flow along Coast Walk, double-seat walls, shade trees, repairs to the existing gazebo, the addition of interpretive/historical/educational signage and use of native plants on the bluffs to control erosion. Asked if it was all worth it, Minick said the proof is in the end result. “It’s a much-beloved, much-visited area,” she noted, adding, “It’s one of the most-visited places in San Diego.”  Minick said a total of $280,000 was raised privately for the plaza project, while pointing out the City took over the project about mid-way through the process.  The La Jolla Merchants Association was one of four major civic organizations along with LJPB, La Jolla Town Council and La Jolla Community Planning Association that supported plaza improvements, voting for the plaza project as their top choice for local park improvements. “As a result, the City Council provided funds in two consecutive budget periods to build this project,” said Minick. “Most importantly, a new bronze plaque bearing names of all major donors is now in place for permanent viewing. When you visit the site, you can find the plaque embedded in a boulder alongside a seating wall toward the north end of the plaza. Additionally, a large sign names all contributors of both funding and services,” Minick said. Children’s Pool Plaza community celebration What: La Jolla Parks and Beaches and Casa de Mañana are co-hosting a community celebration unveiling the plaza’s improvements in the 800 block of Coast Boulevard. When: Sunday, Dec. 9 from 1 to 3 p.m.
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    La Jolla surfer earns first WSL win at Soup Bowl
    by VICTORIA DAVIS
    Nov 27, 2018 | 8270 views | 0 0 comments | 29 29 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Tiare Thompson used her clutch forehand attack to win the World Surf League’s Live Like Zander Junior Pro surf competition.
    Tiare Thompson used her clutch forehand attack to win the World Surf League’s Live Like Zander Junior Pro surf competition.
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    Tiare Thompson is interviewed after winning the World Surf League’s Live Like Zander Junior Pro surf competition.
    Tiare Thompson is interviewed after winning the World Surf League’s Live Like Zander Junior Pro surf competition.
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    Off the shore of Bathsheba, Barbados, three junior pros sat on their surfboards in the Atlantic Ocean, foreheads freckled from sun and salt, as they waited for the Soup Bowl swell they each hoped would carry them to first place. Samantha Sibley, Ava McGowan and Tiare Thompson were on high alert as the last two minutes of the finals heat ticked away at the World Surf League’s Live Like Zander Junior Pro surf competition. Thirty seconds later, Thompson saw her chance, paddled past her fellow surfers, caught the wave and used her clutch forehand attack to earn a 6.23, which added to her previous 7.00, gave her just enough points to beat McGowan. “I saw this inside wave that looked really good,” said 17-year-old Thompson, recalling the moment. “There was a minute and a half left and I just thought, ‘This is the wave.’ I catch it and rip it so hard, riding it all the way to the beach. I come in with 50 seconds left and just hear the announcer go, ‘Tiare Thompson gets the score!’ It was almost surreal feeling.” Nov. 10 marked the day Thompson earned her first big win as a surfer. While she’s already made a name for herself with four California state titles, and by being chosen by the USA Surf Team to represent the United States every year since 2014, Thompson says her victory with WSL was a great way to end the season and prepare for her last year as a Pro Junior. “It was so amazing,” said Thompson. “I was so stoked that I won and as my dad and sister were carrying me up the beach, I was shaking because I was so excited. There was a lot of adrenaline.” The La Jolla-born surfer wasn’t the only one emotional that day. As her family watched beachside while Thompson ripped through the wave’s white caps, her father, Foster, was shouldering the emotions of both a diligent coach and proud parent. “During Tiare’s competitions, it’s totally nerve-wracking and she doesn’t realize it, but I got the butterflies in my stomach,” said Foster, who is an avid surfer himself. “I’m the one who’s pacing back and forth, biting my fingernails watching her every minute throughout the heat.” Tiare, named by her Hawaiian mother after the Tahitian word for Gardenia, has been surfing competitively for 13 years. Thompson’s love of the sport began in Fiji, while visiting the outer island Tavarua with her father. Foster says he still remembers placing his 4-year-old daughter on the large starter board and pushing her through the tropical, crystal blue waters. “She had this uncanny sense of balance,” said Foster. “It was amazing how, at four years old, she didn’t fall off the board. She’d just stand up and ride it all the way to the beach. It wasn’t the biggest wave or smallest board, but I knew from that point forward that it was her destiny to surf.” Her father says from that day forward, Thompson has been in the water for hours every day, surfing even on the coldest days of the year. While Foster says Thompson blew her competition out of the water growing up, now that she’s making her way in the pro world, there’s a whole new set of girls doing all they can to fulfill their own destinies. But Thompson’s got something that sets her apart, other than just her “dynamite” initials, T.N.T. While a majority of her competitors are homeschooled, Thompson has gone to public school her whole surfing career, currently attending her last year at La Jolla High School. Instead of isolating surfing, Thompson’s aquatic niche is interspersed with her family, friends, school, and soon her college career. While it’s a lot to balance, Thompson says surfing remains the one of the more “fun” parts of her life. “My favorite moment is when I do well in a heat, coming into the beach on that wave and seeing how happy my dad is,” said Thompson, who says her surfing heroes range from Bethany Hamilton to Tom Curren, both of whom she’s met. “Also, when I really need to score, seeing a perfect wave coming just to me, it’s like my whole priority and all that matters in that moment. There’s nothing like it.” Tiare is currently one of four junior women to represent the USA in the under 18 division, and for a fourth year in a row, will represent the USA in the Pan America games in Peru, Dec. 2-9.
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    Star of India sails for first time in five years
    Nov 21, 2018 | 26323 views | 0 0 comments | 38 38 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    The Star of India heads back into San Diego Bay on Saturday afternoon after sailing around the Point. /  PHOTO BY CHRIS MANNERINO
    The Star of India heads back into San Diego Bay on Saturday afternoon after sailing around the Point. / PHOTO BY CHRIS MANNERINO
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    The San Salvador replica fires its canon as it and the Star of India sail back into San Diego Bay on Saturday. / PHOTO BY CHRIS MANNERINO
    The San Salvador replica fires its canon as it and the Star of India sail back into San Diego Bay on Saturday. / PHOTO BY CHRIS MANNERINO
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    Star of India set sail from its berth at Maritime Museum of San Diego last weekend to cruise out around the Point and into the Pacific Ocean. Hundreds of onlookers lined Shelter Island, Harbor Island and Cabrillo National Monument to watch the world’s oldest active sailing ship maneuver through the Bay. Star of India, built in 1863, has circumnavigated the globe 21 times, but last weekend, it set sail for the first time in five years. Last Saturday and Sunday, with cooperating winds, San Diegans and visitors gathered on the shorelines of Shelter and Harbor islands to watch Star of India move through San Diego Bay until reaching a position two to three miles west of Point Loma. At that juncture, Star of India proceeded under sail and performed maneuvers. To add to the onlooker’s excitement (and photo opportunities), the Californian, America, and San Salvador sailed in close company with Star of India as it cruised back into San Diego Bay both days. Star of India first came to the City of San Diego in 1927. It was not until 1951 when Maritime Museum of San Diego made long-awaited historical renovations to the vessel, originally named Euterpe, after the Greek goddess of music and poetry. Star of India relies on Maritime Museum of San Diego volunteers and staff for her upkeep. Star of India is the oldest iron-hulled merchant ship still afloat. She was launched as the fully-rigged ship Euterpe at Ramsey Shipyard on the Isle of Man in 1863. Euterpe began her working life with two near-disastrous voyages to India. On her first trip, she suffered a collision and a mutiny. On her second, a cyclone caught Euterpe in the Bay of Bengal, and with her topmasts cut away, she barely made port. Shortly afterward, her first captain died on board and was buried at sea. After such misfortunes, Euterpe would eventually make four more voyages to India as a cargo ship. In 1871 she was purchased by the Shaw Savill line of London and for the next quarter century she transported hundreds of emigrants to New Zealand and Australia. During this period, she made twenty-one circumnavigations. It was rugged voyaging, with the little iron ship battling through terrific gales, “laboring and rolling in a most distressing manner,” according to her log. With the opening of the Suez Canal, and sail giving way to steam power, Euterpe would eventually be sold to the Alaska Packers Association. In 1901, her new owners changed her rig to that of a bark (her present configuration). By the time of her retirement in 1923, she had made 22 voyages from San Francisco to Alaska, returning each year with her hold laden with canned salmon. In 1926, Star of India was sold to the Zoological Society of San Diego as the projected centerpiece for an aquarium and museum. The Great Depression and World War II saw these proposals languish from lack of funding. Eventually in the late 1950s and early 1960s, thanks to a groundswell of support from local San Diegans, Star of India was restored to sailing condition. In 1976, she set sail once again. Her preservation continues as a living reminder of the great Age of Sail, thanks to the tireless efforts of curators and volunteers at the Maritime Museum of San Diego.
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    News
    T. Greenwood presents latest novel, ‘The Golden Hour’ at Warwick’s
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