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    Satisfy a hunger at Taste of Mission Beach
    May 04, 2016 | 2200 views | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Food samples at Cannonball restaurant in Mission Beach. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Food samples at Cannonball restaurant in Mission Beach. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    Treat yourself to a plethora of goodies at the third annual Taste of Mission Beach, to be held 5 to 9 p.m. Thursday, May 12 throughout the beach community's business district. More than two dozen restaurants will be dishing out samples from a variety of cuisines available at the beach. Participating restaurants include Arslan’s Gyros, Café Bahia, Cannonball, Capri Pizza, Coaster Saloon, Chop Shop, Draft, Guava Beach Bar & Grill, Juice Wave, Kojak’s, Luigi’s at the Beach, Marci’s, Miss B’s Coconut Club, Mission Beach Coffee Break, Olive Café, Olive Bakery, Rosaria Pizza, Rubicon Pizza, Sandbar Sports Bar & Grill, Saska’s Steak & Seafood, Starbucks, Swell Coffee Co., The Pennant, Toots Sandbar and Oceana Coastal Kitchen. Taste start locations will be at Mission Beach Coffee Break, 2888 Mission Blvd., and Saska's Steak & Seafood, 3768 Mission Blvd. The annual restaurant walk is being co-sponsored by Mission Beach Women’s Club and Mission Beach Town Council. Free shuttles will be available to pick-up/drop-off participants at every bus stop along the route. Tasters can also take a cruise on the Bahia Belle by catching it at either the Catamaran or the Bahia, or ride a bike free of charge donated by Cheap Rentals. Tickets are $30 a person with proceeds going to PlayByTheBay.org. It is a campaign to upgrade playground equipment and re-create the Bonita Cove public, community recreation area across from Belmont Park. Tickets can be purchased at Juicy Wave, Kojak’s, Luigi’s at the Beach, Mission Beach Coffee Break, Olive Bakery, Saska’s Steak & Seafood, The Pennant, and Toots Sandbar. Tickets are also available at mbwc.org.
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    Four days of Cinco de Mayo Fiesta at Old Town
    May 04, 2016 | 2737 views | 0 0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend | print
     The 33rd annual event will transform Old Town into the largest Cinco de Mayo celebration north of the border.
    The 33rd annual event will transform Old Town into the largest Cinco de Mayo celebration north of the border.
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    Grab your amigos and head over to historic Old Town Thursday through Sunday, May 5 through 8, to spice up your weekend with the annual Fiesta Old Town Cinco de Mayo. Celebrating 33 years of fiery fun, Fiesta is sure to be muy caliente. The 33rd annual event will transform Old Town into the largest Cinco de Mayo celebration north of the border. For additional information, call (619) 291-4903 or visit CincoDeMayoOldTown.com. Cinco de Mayo - Thursday, May 5 Join Old Town's top bars and restaurants in celebrating Cinco de Mayo with festive drink and food specials, live entertainment and festivities sure to get you in the mood. Seis de Mayo - Friday, May 6 Keep the fiesta going from 4 to 10 p.m. in the streets of historic Old Town. San Diego Avenue transforms into a lively, bustling mercado, where you can purchase an array of delicious food and unique treasures. Tour down the iconic Lowrider Lane on Harney Street and take in the incredible spectacle of more than 20 beautifully crafted low-rider cars. This collection has become a crowd favorite. Be sure to cast your vote for the coveted People's Choice Award as well. Everywhere you go, music will be playing, and you can salsa over to one of the three main stages to hear authentic mariachis, Latin rock ‘n’ roll, DJs and more. Siete de Mayo - Saturday, May 7 On Siete de Mayo, there is something to get the party started for everyone. Those of you who are looking for a cerveza-filled day will want to head over to the Cantina Garden for a refreshing ice-cold beer or margarita featuring Dos Equis, Cointreau, Frida Kahlo Tequila and Herradura. For the ninos and ninas, there will be a petting zoo and pony rides from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Ballet Folklorico competitions will take place from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Saunter down El Mercado to bargain for sombreros, handmade leather pieces, beautiful jewelry and many more treasures that will line San Diego Avenue. Ocho de Mayo - Dia de las Madres - Sunday, May 8 Bring your Sunday to Old Town for the last day of Fiesta Cinco de Mayo, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. This will be your final day to enjoy the festivities, entertainment, the petting zoo and Ballet Folklorico competition. Celebrate your madre for Dia de las Madres by taking her to a delicious Old Town brunch with extended restaurant and bar specials. There won't be any time for a siesta, what with so many specialty stores and museums to explore. You won't want to miss this opportunity to be surrounded by the history and culture of Mexico. Proceeds benefit the Historic Old Town Community Foundation. For additional information, call (619) 291-4903 or visit CincoDeMayoOldTown.com. If you are interested in filming live or scheduling an interview or need logos or images, contact Camille Riley at McFarlane Promotions by calling (619) 233-5008.
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    From the Stranger Than Fiction Department: Mother's Day founder was once arrested for disturbing the peace
    by MARTIN JONES WESTLIN
    May 02, 2016 | 8817 views | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Anna Jarvis, acknowledged founder of Mother's Day, about flipped when she saw the post office's 1934 holiday tribute. She thought its carnations amounted to a shameless capitalist plug for the floral industry.
    Anna Jarvis, acknowledged founder of Mother's Day, about flipped when she saw the post office's 1934 holiday tribute. She thought its carnations amounted to a shameless capitalist plug for the floral industry.
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    The nation's heart was probably in the right place, but one interested party couldn't find a pulse. The year was 1934, and the U.S. Post Office had just issued a pretty carnation-laden stamp in honor of Mother's Day, 20 years after President Woodrow Wilson issued a proclamation establishing the recognition of mothers and motherhood. So far, so good – but one person suspiciously close to the issue wasn't having it. Anna Jarvis, the holiday's acknowledged founder, let fly at the sight of the flowers, recalling her brushes with the law over the exact same subject: money. In New York in 1925, she'd crashed an American War Mothers gathering wherein white carnations – the flower most associated with Mother's Day – were being sold to raise funds. She was arrested for disturbing the peace, a hair's breadth away from jail. Florists were Beelzebub on wheels, she'd declare amid the capitalistic degradation of the sentiment behind her lifelong project. Card manufacturers and chocolatiers and vintners weren't any better, she'd sizz, sitting atop a mountain of process papers and lawsuit records in defiance of the enemy and its devotion to the evil behind the American dollar bill. The country's fabled vast right-wing conspiracy had come to call a few decades before its time, and it wasn't going away. Jarvis, who in 1948 died blind and penniless at 84 in a Philadelphia-area sanitarium, spent half her life fighting to abolish the holiday she'd started solely on the strength of her love for her mom. If she were alive today, she'd be cut to the quick to learn that Mother's Day commands around $22 billion in spending every year, the most of any nonwinter holiday. More than that, the day is celebrated in more than 60 countries, meaning that America by no means has a corner on the floral, card or chocolate markets. Nevertheless, Anna needed to get out more and kick up her heels. While Mother's Day price tags are clearly obscene, the thought behind them surely is not. To draw a parallel between the two is like saying the cashiers at the gas station are a bunch of greedy bozos because their prices are so high. For better or worse, there are innumerable forces at work inside the American economy, and there's plenty of blame to go around amid its pesky inertia and wholesale inequalities. Anna could have rested easy on her efforts at launching the holiday in 1908 and letting the chips fall the way they did. Thanks to her, we have a Mother's Day at all; anything less, even at sky-high prices, would have meant a serious blow to the cultural landscape. (Full disclosure: Anna's final sanitarium expenses were paid by a group of Philadelphia florists.)
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    Pacific Beach Tennis Club courts Mission Bay planners
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Apr 22, 2016 | 8555 views | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    One of the many stakeholders in the three-year, city-led process of planning regional park improvements is the Pacific Beach Tennis Club (PBTC).
    One of the many stakeholders in the three-year, city-led process of planning regional park improvements is the Pacific Beach Tennis Club (PBTC).
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    The next community workshop on the De Anza Revitalization Plan, a reimagining of what Mission Bay Park's approximately 4,000 acres of beaches, parklands, SeaWorld and more could become, will take place 6 p.m. Wednesday, April 27 at Mission Bay High School, 2475 Grand Ave. One of the many stakeholders in the three-year, city-led process of planning regional park improvements is the Pacific Beach Tennis Club (PBTC). The club is lobbying to ensure its place in the new order of things will be assured. “We want to make sure people appreciate the benefits of having the tennis club, which develops junior tennis and athletics and has been open to the public since the 1960s,” said David Fogel, president of PBTC, located adjacent to the Mission Bay Golf Course. PBTC has eight well-lighted courts, a ball machine that can be rented out, a small clubhouse that offers racquet string services, a pro shop and a dressing room. “We want to make sure that the people making the recommendations see the value of what we have here,” added Fogel. PBTC began in 1961, when a group headed by Dr. James Grant raised funds to construct six courts on land the city of San Diego provided. Subsequently, a small clubhouse and two additional courts were added as well as the present lighting system. The nonprofit club's funds are used to pay supervision, maintenance, tennis activities and capital improvement expenditures. Of PBTC's fate, city park designer Craig Hooker said, “Currently, all options are on the table in terms of existing and proposed uses within the De Anza plan area. We encourage tennis enthusiasts and club members to continue their participation in the plan process.” The plan is part of an ongoing amendment to the Mission Bay Park master plan, which guides usage of the popular regional park. Mission Bay is one of San Diego's premiere tourist and recreational destinations. The 120-acre project area embraces more than just Mission Bay Golf Course. It includes the De Anza Special Study Area (mobile home and RV park), De Anza Cove Park and the surrounding uses, including Mission Bay Boat & Ski Club and Bob McEvoy Athletic Field as well as Mission Bay Tennis Club. In anticipation of the closure of the De Anza Mobile Home Park, the city has initiated the planning process for the special study that will result in a development plan. This revitalization plan is needed to implement the Mission Bay Park Master Plan and to lay out a design and use program for the reuse and redevelopment of the site. Fogel wants to ensure that whatever “reimagining” is done at De Anza doesn't omit PBTC. “It's important for our kids and grownups, from age 1 to 92, to have a nice place to go,” he said. “We realize the De Anza area is valuable real estate for the city. We want to make sure we (PBTC) have a place in that future.” The first ad hoc subcommittee meeting on the De Anza Revitalization Plan was held Dec. 9. Paul Robinson, chair of the 11-member ad hoc committee, said then that the task is to work with the city and consultants on developing a vision and guiding principles for a De Anza revitalization plan to amend the existing Mission Bay Park Master Plan. The effort to redevelop the regional park was delayed by a decadelong court battle between the city and residents of the 500-unit De Anza Cove Resort mobile home park, a 75-acre park on prime real estate jutting into the water in Mission Bay Park west of I-5. Ultimately, the city reached a $3.6 million settlement agreement on one of three lawsuits involving current and former mobile home park residents allowing them to relocate. For more information, visit deanzarevitalizationplan.com/. Community workshop What: Workshop on the De Anza Revitalization Plan. When: 6 p.m. Wednesday, April 27. Where: Mission Bay High School, 2475 Grand Ave.
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    Photographer highlights humanity of homeless in Pacific Beach
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Apr 22, 2016 | 7200 views | 0 0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Photographer Lisa Kanemoto of Bird Rock has been documenting and getting to know Pacific Beach’s homeless population.
    Photographer Lisa Kanemoto of Bird Rock has been documenting and getting to know Pacific Beach’s homeless population.
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    Photographer Lisa Kanemoto has been documenting and getting to know Pacific Beach’s homeless population.
    Photographer Lisa Kanemoto has been documenting and getting to know Pacific Beach’s homeless population.
    slideshow
    Photographer Lisa Kanemoto has been documenting and getting to know Pacific Beach’s homeless population.
    Photographer Lisa Kanemoto has been documenting and getting to know Pacific Beach’s homeless population.
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    The face of homelessness in Pacific Beach is coming more sharply into focus these days thanks to the photographic work of Lisa Kanemoto of Bird Rock. As she's done previously, Kanemoto has used her camera lens to expose social ills and injustice. In a photographic book titled “We Are,” she documented the gay revolution in San Francisco in the 1980s. In “Dark Mirror,'” a self-analytical work, Kanemoto explores her personal demons, touching on the horrors of her childhood in Germany during World War II and concealing her partial Jewish ancestry, the death of her father on the Russian front and, later, her son's schizophrenia as well as her own account of surviving a mastectomy. Now, she's trained her shutter onto another fringe group: Pacific Beach's homeless population. “I'm changing my whole outlook on life,” said Kanemoto of her new photographic passion, chronicling the lives of people living in the shadows on the streets of PB. “Every single one of these people, I've fallen in love with all of them.” The photographer of 40 years talked about that “first” encounter with a homeless person about five years ago. “I took a walk every morning at the boardwalk, and one day I found a man, Tommy, from Chicago, sitting there crying like a baby,” she said, noting that getting to know him was an eye-opening and transformative experience. “He was so heavy into drugs that, at age 17, he'd killed somebody and was put into prison,” she said. “After he got out on good behavior… that's when the heavy drinking started. I talked to him, and he introduced me to others.” Tommy's story is a sad and tragic one, said Kanemoto, noting “as many as 85 percent of the people out on the streets are mentally ill, with some coming from terrible homes where both parents took drugs.” Thumbing through a portfolio of her most recent work capturing the plight – and indomitable spirit – of the beach homeless, one can't help but be moved by the insight and clarity of Kanemoto's vision. “I've gotten initiated – and I'm proud of it,” the photographer said of her entry into PB homeless society, where she is affectionately known as Grandmother by many. “I feel very motherly,” she said. “This is my gang.” Thumbing through her portfolio, her finger stops on Birdman and then on a gentleman who was once a pastor and is now going through alcohol rehab. Kanemoto said it's surprising how much the homeless, even those who are mentally ill, can respond to expressions of openness and warmth. “I've taken their pictures and talked with them about their families,” said Kanemoto, noting one of her newfound friends, a man, “has 11 kids.” Another homeless woman Kanemoto knows smiles even though she no longer has any teeth. “I find that so endearing,” she noted. Kanemoto spoke of another homeless friend's account of how he became a street person. “He said one day he prayed to God for guidance, and God told him, 'Sell all your belongings, give up your studio and follow Me,’ which he did. He sold everything he owned, joined the homeless and became homeless himself.” Today, Kanemoto said that same man can be seen preaching Sunday nights in a local church. “It's inspiring to me,” she said. “It changes my outlook on things.” In the introduction to her blog, which can be found at homelessofpacificbeach.wordpress.com/, Kanemoto writes, “I feel the responsibility to help those who are rejected by society. With this documentary, I created a portrait of people who are feared and ignored. I'm trying to shed light on their shadowy world as an observer, a friend and participant in the drama of their lives. I focus on the individual with the intent to show the dignity and goodness inherent in every human being and give thought to what brought my new friends into their present situation. I dedicate this to all my homeless friends.”
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    News
    Girl Scouts remember Ashley Heffington at annual event
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    May 04, 2016 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Sports
    Over-The-Line Tournament signups in Mission Beach
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    May 03, 2016 | 1 1 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Opinion
    City policies hurting business growth in Pacific Beach
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    May 04, 2016 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Arts & Entertainment
    Ocean Beach’s Jesse Egan hosts ‘Tonight In San Diego’
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    May 04, 2016 | 0 0 comments | 6 6 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Business
    New restaurants and bars coming to Pacific and Mission beaches
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    May 04, 2016 | 0 0 comments | 10 10 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Obituaries
    Gregory B. Anderson
    Greg Anderson passed away peacefully at home of congestive heart failure on March 17, 2016, just days shy of his 85th birthday, surrounded by his wife Eve and his children. Greg was born on March 2...
    Apr 18, 2016 | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend
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