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    Summer fun with Bianca – Playing at Dog Beach in Ocean Beach and then a bath for Shila
    by BIANCA WEINSTEIN
    May 23, 2015 | 22599 views | 0 0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Bianca and Shila at the Dog Beach in Ocean Beach.
    Bianca and Shila at the Dog Beach in Ocean Beach.
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    Bianca and Shila at Dog Beach Dog Wash in Ocean Beach.
    Bianca and Shila at Dog Beach Dog Wash in Ocean Beach.
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    Shila getting a bath from Bianca at Dog Beach Dog Wash in Ocean Beach.
    Shila getting a bath from Bianca at Dog Beach Dog Wash in Ocean Beach.
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    Bianca and Shila play at Ocean Beach's Dog Beach.
    Bianca and Shila play at Ocean Beach's Dog Beach.
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    Shila meets some friends at the Dog Beach.
    Shila meets some friends at the Dog Beach.
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    The other day, I was playing with my boxer Shila, and I thought it would be a great idea to take her to Ocean Beach's Dog Beach. I packed up the car and headed out to let her run around and play. Dog Beach is an off-leash beach located at the north end of Ocean Beach, and it is the only 24-hour dog beach in the San Diego area. Before we even got out of the car, Shila was already excited and wagging her little tail. Once her paws hit the sand, Shila was off running around, meeting the other dogs. She became instant friends with some golden retrievers and was having the time of her life running and chasing a ball into the water. After meeting all the friendly dogs, Shila was worn out and ready to take a nap. Before Shila could go home, I took her to Dog Beach Dog Wash to give her a bath. The dog wash is open seven days a week from 7 a.m. to 9 p.m., with the last dog wash 30 minutes prior to closing. The dog wash includes warm water, shampoo, a grooming mitt, washcloths, an apron, towels and a brush, all for just $14. For an additional $2.50, you can use a specialty shampoo, such as hypoallergenic, flea and tick (pyrethrin or neem), coat brightening (black, bronze or whitener), moisturizing shampoo and a few more choices depending on your dog's needs. If you want your dog's coat conditioned, you can use conditioners such as aloe vera, chamomile and oatmeal for an additional $2.50 and aloe remoisturizer for $3.50. After considering the shampoo choices and conditioners, I opted for the regular dog wash and began bathing Shila with the shampoo provided with the wash. Though she is a little baby when it comes to bath time, she was feeling much softer and looking very clean afterward. Dog Beach Dog Wash also offers other services for after the bath, such as a $3.50 blow dry or fluff-box dry, grooming table/Clipper-Vac ($5 per every 15 minutes) and nail trimming for $13. There are also toys and treats available for purchase in the store ranging from $1 up. Remember to always pick up after your pet and to keep Dog Beach clean. Dog Beach Dog Wash Where: 4933 Voltaire St. Contact: (619) 523-1700 or dogwash.com
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    Some residents over the fence on new South Mission Beach lifeguard tower
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    May 21, 2015 | 3437 views | 6 6 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    A construction fence borders the build site for the new lifeguard station, which is being erected just to the north of the old tower in South Mission Beach. Construction started this spring, and a foundation (to the left) for the new structure is being laid out. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    A construction fence borders the build site for the new lifeguard station, which is being erected just to the north of the old tower in South Mission Beach. Construction started this spring, and a foundation (to the left) for the new structure is being laid out. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    Neighbors opposed to the citing of a new lifeguard tower in South Mission Beach continued to press their case before Mission Beach Town Council, arguing they were denied due process in vetting plans for the new facility, which is larger and located elsewhere than originally planned. Project construction on the new lifeguard station started this spring, and a foundation is being built on the north side of the current tower. “As the number of visitors to our beaches increase, the facilities that afford protection to beachgoers become more important,” said Rick Wurts, lifeguard chief at San Diego Fire-Rescue. Construction will stop from Memorial Day to Labor Day due to the city's annual beach area construction moratorium. Lifeguards will be using the old tower until the new one is finished next summer. “We’re not against the lifeguards; they’re the heroes of the beach, or their lifeguard tower, and we want them to have the best equipment and so on,” said Mission Beach resident Ken Giavara, speaking May 13 for some neighbors. Opponents claim that, as presently configured, the tower will negatively impact their views and property values. “Our argument is with the (approval) process and the lack of honesty and transparency,” said Giavara. The existing, outdated South Mission Beach lifeguard tower is a temporary 900-square-foot facility constructed in 1974. City officials say it no longer meets the needs of lifeguards or the public. Recently, the city rolled out a new strategic plan that includes the following goals: to protect lives, property and the environment through timely and effective response in all communities, and to invest in infrastructure. According to Wurts, the South Mission Beach lifeguard tower project will achieve those goals once the project is complete, and for many years to come. Specifically, the South Mission Beach lifeguard station will address many important public safety and operational needs. “The station will be more centrally located on the beach, improving water observation (i.e., lifesaving opportunities) and overall beach management,” Wurtz said. “It will provide much needed space to house critical emergency equipment and vehicles. It also addresses minimum facility standards for employees, such as separate men’s and women’s locker rooms,” he added. The new nearly 4,000-square-foot, three-story lifeguard tower would have a ground floor with a first-aid room and storage for rescue vehicles and equipment; a second floor with an observation deck and an administration area; and a third floor housing the main observation tower. The new tower project will include repair of adjacent sidewalks and curbs, installation of an erosion control barrier, improvement of American with Disabilities Act accessibility, restriping of parking spaces, installation of new signage and installation of a sidewalk from the parking lot to the station entrance. According to Wurts, the new tower was designed in a way that minimizes the impact to public views, and the project was also reviewed and approved by the San Diego City Council, which follows the standards for public noticing. After the May 13 meeting, Giavara said a lawsuit, yet to be filed, is planned to block the project until or unless it’s properly vetted. “Why are you (city) building the hub (tower and ancillary boat and equipment storage, men’s and women’s locker rooms) in the middle of the beach?” asked Giavara, noting neighbors are not offering a solution, just insisting that the project “go through the proper legal channels.” Noting the project is decidedly different now than when first approved back in 2004, Giavara pointed out community planners back then “rejected the building at 3,500 feet as being too big.” He added they also wanted the lifeguard station “to be built on the same spot as the previous one.” “This (proposed) building has never been approved at any level of government at any hearing and was rejected in 2004,” said Giavara, noting, “The city is breaking its own laws.” According to Wurts, city staff has worked diligently to communicate lifeguard operational priorities with members of the community, attending meetings of the Mission Beach Precise Planning Board and the Mission Beach Town Council in addition to mailing out notification letters at various stages of the project. Tower opponents claim the city didn’t issue proper notification of the changes to the project or its new timeline for construction. “In 2006, when the city had a hearing on this project, they didn’t notify anyone not within a 300-foot radius of the project,” said Giavara, who said the rule actually applies 300 feet from the property line. “And the property line is the boardwalk,” said Giavara. “There are 300 to 400 residents and property owners who should have been notified.” Giavara pointed out many people in the affected area who’ve invested in rental income property will be adversely impacted by a huge lifeguard tower obstructing their view in the middle of the beach. Originally proposed in 2002 at an estimated $1.1 million, the cost of the long-delayed South Mission Beach lifeguard project escalated to nearly $5 million. Information about the project can also be found on the Capital Improvements Program website www.sandiego.gov/cip and on the California Coastal Commission website www.coastal.ca.gov/.
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    labeach
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    May 22, 2015
    When did the 30ft height limit on the coast get changed to a 35ft height limit? I protest this constant bending of the law.

    We, the people of San Diego, are losing our beaches to rising ocean levels whether or not the city is admitting this fact , and building giant lifeguard comfort stations and parking garages ON the disappearing beaches, from decade old plans, blocking access and availability to the public beach for the people, is selfish and foolish...

    The lifeguards have been exaggerating their rescue numbers on our beaches for years...

    HOPEFULLY the over-trendy city designers will design some windows that the lifeguards can actually see through when the glare is on... Not like the la Jolla Shores lifeguard tower fiasco!
    bcbrewster
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    May 22, 2015
    Please provide your evidence that the lifeguards have been exaggerating their rescue numbers on our beaches for years.
    Kengiavara
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    May 23, 2015
    Wait, how do you know the height is 35 ft? Is there anything legal about this project?
    Kengiavara
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    May 23, 2015
    Isn't bcbrewster the former lifeguard that wrote the article that accused only the affluent ocean front owners as being the only ones complaining? That's pretty ignorant. There are plenty of non ocean front owners complaining about this project and the illegalities of the way it went through as well as the cost and size. Do you realize that it's possible to support the lifeguards and be against this project? Even if you are a lifeguard or former lifeguard doesn't the illegal way this project went through upset you as a citizen?
    bcbrewster
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    May 24, 2015
    Mr. Giavara: Indeed I am the author of the op-ed to which you refer. I am aware that you and others have alleged that this project was handled illegally. I am unaware of any evidence of the truth of that assertion. Normally, such assertions are a matter of opinion, not of law, until and unless adjudicated.
    OlyNelson
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    May 21, 2015
    4,000 sq ft for an observation tower on our precious beach! Are you frick'n kidding me! I know the lifeguards are going to pull out their "Public Safety Card" and say if they can't have all their vehicles, equipment, showers, lockers rooms etc. etc., on the beach, then someone is going to DIE. Well, they are doing a pretty damn good job preventing death already without the Tower Mahal. They want to build more of these in other locations like PB. What happened to the good old days of lifeguards sprinting down to their work locations carrying fins, binos and an orange floaty? Footprints on the beach should be bare feet not be tire tracks and concrete monuments!
    Surfrider chair discusses San Diego chapter's role in maintaining beaches and bays
    by THOMAS MELVILLE
    May 20, 2015 | 12213 views | 0 0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Surfrider Foundation San Diego County Chapter chair Mark West says, “That’s why we’re here.”
    Surfrider Foundation San Diego County Chapter chair Mark West says, “That’s why we’re here.”
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    About two weeks ago on the deck at Paradise Point Resort, just as the sun started to set over Mission Bay, Surfrider Foundation San Diego County Chapter chair Mark West looked over his right shoulder to see the golden hour glow growing. “See that? That's what it's all about,” he said, as he waved his arms toward the bay. “That's why we're here.” “Here” was at the Surfrider Foundation San Diego County Chapter’s 15th annual Art Gala, which raised $34,000 to help protect the region's coastline and directly benefit the organization’s education, outreach and advocacy directed at protecting local beaches. The event, which was held Friday, May 8, celebrated ocean advocacy while showcasing local artists and raising funds. “It was a thrill to see so many enthusiastic activists and supporters gathered for the event,” said new San Diego Chapter manager Mandy Sackett. While the activists and supporters bid on artwork, nibbled on orange chicken and drank Stone IPA, West was working the room making and re-establishing connections for the nonprofit. Right before sunset, the Beach & Bay Press caught up with him to discuss Surfrider and the role it plays in maintaining the area's coastal areas. BBP: How would you describe the Surfrider Foundation? Mark West: I would say that the Surfrider Foundation is all about making sure that each person can go to the beach, enjoy their day at the beach, spend their time in the ocean, spend their time in the waves, and have a great experience. This is a California treasure that so many people take for granted, but we don’t. We work to protect our oceans, waves, and beaches so everyone can use them. BBP: Why is the Surfrider Foundation important? MW: Our mission is to protect the ocean, waves, and beaches through a powerful activist network. What we do is we actually take all people who are passionate about our ocean, our beaches, our bays, and get together and really work toward cleaning them up, preventing pollution from getting into them. We even do stuff like ocean-friendly gardens where we’re thinking about the drought and how we can plant ocean-friendly gardens out there that are really California specific; they require no water, and they actually have less run-off as well. BBP: What does Surfrider do for the bays? MW: This bay (Mission Bay) has beaches all around it. We actually hold clean-ups right here in Mission Bay that are cleaning the beaches of litter before it gets into the bay. This is a large ecosystem that flows into our ocean, and if we can clean it here, then it cleans it out in our ocean, and we’ve worked really hard to make sure that we are removing pollution from this area. BBP: Do some people think Surfrider is just about surfers? MW: It’s funny, I don’t think people know that this is more than just surfers. I was a 24-year U.S. naval officer before I became the chair of Surfrider. We have all different kinds of people who are working for this because we are all very passionate about our ocean, waves, and beaches. It’s a group effort. I’ve got moms. I’ve got hipsters. I’ve got people who are all really into this group, and it’s all about people. BBP: How many members in the San Diego chapter? MW: We have about 5,000 active members, but in our email distribution list we have about 10,000 activists who are applying or involved in some form or another. Not everyone is cleaning the beaches. We have some doing web development. We have some people designing T-shirts. Everybody who has something that they’re passionate about, oceans, waves, and beaches, can come out and play a particular role in it. You don’t have to clean the beaches. Do other things. It’s all for the same good. BBP: What is the annual art gala? MW: The 15th annual art gala at Paradise Point in Mission Bay was a fantastic event. This event is our largest fundraiser that we have each year, so it’s really our biggest event that we hold, and we get all the people from all over San Diego to come out and talk about Surfrider. BBP: The funds you raise go where? MW: Right back into the protection of oceans, waves, and beaches. Every penny that we have goes right back into it. We do have a staff of two people, which for this group is nothing, but we have to make sure that we pay for the T-shirts, that we get the beach clean-up supplies. We have all these different things. This event really drives our entire year budget. So that’s why it’s so important for people come and help us out. BBP: Surfrider holds clean-ups and also has a specific program about getting the “butt” out? MW: We do beach clean-ups. San Diego is one of the largest chapters in Surfrider. We have 70 miles of beaches, which stretch from the border all the way up to San Clemente. Believe it or not, that’s part of our group. We take care of those 70 miles with programs such as “rise above plastics,” which is trying to reduce plastic that gets washed onto your beaches and carried to our beaches; and we have our “hold onto our butts” program. Cigarette butt pollution is the largest polluter of our beaches in our entire world. We get rid of those, we recycle them and turn them into money. BBP: How do you turn it (cigarette butts) into money? MW: There’s actually a company, out of Maryland, that is recycling the butts, and they either take them and turn them into furniture or certain things, and then they actually pay per pound. It’s not a ton of money, but they’re actually turning it into profits we can market back to our mission. BBP: What are some of the organizations Surfrider partners with? MW: We partner with a lot of local organizations including Wild Out Coast, which is down in the Imperial Beach area. We work with them on our No Border Sewage campaign, which is eliminating transborder pollution that is flowing from Mexico into our Imperial Beach area. We work with San Diego Coastkeeper, in fact the waterkeeper at Coastkeepers is on the board at Surfrider San Diego. So we have people all over that are in different organizations. We’re with I Love a Clean San Diego. A multitude of organizations. Really, it’s all about having people, all working toward a central goal. BBP: And that central goal is? MW: Protection of the ocean, waves, and beaches. BBP: What has Surfrider done to make a beachgoers experience more special? MW: Let me tell you about a story. Imperial Beac, where I live. In the 1970s one of the first real environment success stories of San Diego Surfrider happened. There was a proposal to build a mile long jetty at Imperial Beach. Literally rocks all the way down. We worked through our local governments to make sure that didn’t happen. I mean they were really taking the rocks out there. The majority of people, you go to the beach, you're just a normal ocean goer, we're protecting that by cleaning the beaches constantly. We have a huge network of people who go out and really work toward cleaning those beaches. So, you can take it for granted, but were gonna take care of it for you anyway. For more information, visit sandiego.surfrider.org or contact Chapter manager Mandy Sackett at mandy@surfridersd.org or (440) 749-6845.
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    CSAG unveils funding plan for new multi-use Chargers stadium
    May 18, 2015 | 7895 views | 1 1 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Included in CSAG’s plan is a $950 million proposed stadium designed by MEIS, a New York-based stadium design firm, that would take advantage of San Diego’s sunny and mild year-round climate.
    Included in CSAG’s plan is a $950 million proposed stadium designed by MEIS, a New York-based stadium design firm, that would take advantage of San Diego’s sunny and mild year-round climate.
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    Citizens' Stadium Advisory Group (CSAG) released its “Site Selection and Financing Plan for New Multi-Use Stadium in San Diego” on Monday, May 18. CSAG concluded a new multi-use stadium in Mission Valley is the most viable option, and would cost approximately $1.1 billion, excluding land. To pay for the facility, CSAG outlined more than $1.4 billion in revenue streams without increasing taxes. “Despite so many dramatic changes and potential distractions, both here and elsewhere over the last four months, our community rallied and kept moving forward,” said Mayor Faulconer. “San Diego now has a framework to build a new stadium that’s tangible, that’s achievable and that won’t raise taxes.” To pay for the proposed stadium, parking, stadium-related infrastructure and operations and maintenance, CSAG’s financing plan includes 60 acres of land from the City of San Diego valued at $180 million, and more than a dozen funding sources that exceed $1.4 billion, including: $300 million from the Chargers $173 million in bondable construction capital from the team’s rent. $200 million from the NFL. $121 million from the County of San Diego. $121 million from the City of San Diego. $225 million from the sale of 75 acres of land. More than $100 million from fans, who would contribute through the purchase of personal seat licenses (PSLs), and ticket and parking surcharges. “CSAG’s plan is the first chance the community has had to solve a problem that has existed since I first arrived in 2001. I hope the city, county and the Chargers use this plan as a basis to retain the team in the community it belongs,” said former Charger LaDainian Tomlinson. Included in CSAG’s plan is a $950 million proposed stadium designed by MEIS, a New York-based stadium design firm, that would take advantage of San Diego’s sunny and mild year-round climate. Stadium design veteran Dan Meis is the founder and managing principal at MEIS. He was the lead designer for the Staples Center in Los Angeles and two existing NFL stadiums – Paul Brown Stadium in Cincinnati and Lincoln Financial Field in Philadelphia. MEIS currently is working on renovations at Paul Brown Stadium and designing a new 60,000-seat soccer stadium in Rome, Italy called Stadio Della Roma that includes a mixed-use entertainment village similar to LA Live at Staples Center. "Unlike major league baseball that has been so successful in developing stadiums that are well integrated and evocative of their locations – Camden Yards in Baltimore, AT&T Park in San Francisco – NFL stadiums have been, for the most part, fairly generic architecturally,” Meis said. “We believe the design we created for the proposed stadium in San Diego will alter that trend by presenting a venue that truly embodies the city's landscape and spirit." In addition to the stadium, CSAG’s research led it to estimate that parking and stadium-related infrastructure would cost $204 million. The state-of-the-art venue would be home to the Chargers, San Diego State Aztecs, the Holiday and Poinsettia Bowls, and numerous other events – from corporate events to rodeos – that would help pay for operations and maintenance. CSAG released its financing plan at a news conference at the San Diego County Operations Center/Campus Center Chambers. As for the site selection, CSAG’s report says without Mission Valley a clear path to a stadium would not exist in San Diego. "Given the accelerated timeline the NFL and the Chargers established, the Mission Valley site emerged as the only option that leads to a ribbon cutting ceremony at a new stadium before the end of the decade," CSAG's report says. The city and the City’s Water Department own the land, valued at $180 million, and the 166-acre site has tremendous potential. CSAG also examined a downtown location, which proved to be unworkable for a variety of reasons outlined in the report. “From the beginning of this process you could tell this time was different, and CSAG’s plan confirms that,” said Rafael Alvarez, who heads Bolt Pride and helps lead Save Our Bolts, which represent more than 20,000 Chargers' fans. Now it’s time for the Chargers, the city and the county to finish what CSAG started. The Chargers belong in San Diego." - See more at: http://www.apexstrat.com/newsroom/press-releases/csag-lays-out-a-clear-and-workable-path-to-a-new-multi-use-stadium.html#sthash.XYLWCMz8.dpuf
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    labeach
    |
    May 22, 2015
    Pro Sports are like a weird drug...
    Summer fun with Bianca – dodging giant obstacles at VAVi's Wipeout Run
    by BIANCA WEINSTEIN
    May 14, 2015 | 15517 views | 0 0 comments | 7 7 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Bianca tries to negotiate the giant red balls obstacle. / Photo by Derek Arthurs
    Bianca tries to negotiate the giant red balls obstacle. / Photo by Derek Arthurs
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    Bianca gets ready to try new obstacles. / Photo by Derek Arthurs
    Bianca gets ready to try new obstacles. / Photo by Derek Arthurs
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    Participants get ready to attempt the Wipeout Run. / Photo by Derek Arthurs
    Participants get ready to attempt the Wipeout Run. / Photo by Derek Arthurs
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    Bianca balances on the Dope on a Rope obstacle at the Wipeout Run. / Photo by Derek Arthurs
    Bianca balances on the Dope on a Rope obstacle at the Wipeout Run. / Photo by Derek Arthurs
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    Bianca climbs through the Monkey Business obstacle at the Wipeout Run. / Photo by Derek Arthurs
    Bianca climbs through the Monkey Business obstacle at the Wipeout Run. / Photo by Derek Arthurs
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    Bianca swings over an obstacle.
    Bianca swings over an obstacle.
    Over this past weekend, the Pacific Beach-based company VAVi Sports & Social brought the game show “Wipeout” to a new level. The Wipeout Run is a 5k course featuring obstacles inspired by the hit TV show. The race is held each year at the Del Mar Fairgrounds ($10 parking fee) with start times anywhere from 7:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. For $65, you can have the “Wipeout” experience as seen on TV. VAVi started out as an adult recreation league for sports like kickball, flag football, and beach volleyball, and has since grown into a company with more than 90,000 active, young professionals from all over San Diego who come play on and off the field each year. The organization brings together fun, like-minded individuals with the perfect hybrid of top notch sports leagues and premier social events. VAVi also puts together large scale events such as the Heroes Brew Fest, Del Mar Mud Run and the Wipeout Run, which draws participants from all of San Diego County and beyond. The Wipeout Run event travels to 22 cities across the country; San Diego being one of those stops. The race includes 12 challenge obstacles: Dope on a Rope, Tumble Tubes, Monkey Business, Smash Wall, Foam of Fury, The Drop, Big Balls, Sky’s The Limit, Bubble Bash Swing, Sweeper, the infamous Wrecking Balls, and finally the four-story Happy Ending. Some of the obstacles were fairly hard to complete without taking a fall into the water. For instance, the Big Balls required you to cross a gap by jumping onto one of four large balls, had less than a 10 percent success rate. When I went through, one worker said that less than 10 people had made it through all day. Then there was the Wrecking Balls. In order to pass this obstacle, you had to run across a narrow bridge over a pool while two large wrecking balls swung back and forth. Move too quickly and you’ll lose your balance, move too slow and you’re sure to get taken out by the wrecking ball. At the end of the run, you get to make your way down the world’s largest inflatable water slide to your Happy Ending. Though you walk away from the Wipeout Run drenched, you leave knowing you had the “Wipeout” experience. Make sure you bring a towel and a change of clothes though, you’ll definitely need it afterwards! VAVi Sports & Social Where: 3453 Ingraham St. What: Founded in 2002, VAVi Sport & Social is the leading provider of adult sports leagues and large scale social and running events within the social sports industry. Info: (858) 273-3485, vavi.com and wipeoutrun.com
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    News
    Bike to Work this Friday in San Diego
    Thousands of bike riders throughout the San Diego region will GO by BIKE on the morning of Bike to Work Day, Friday, May 29, as they attempt to log 25,000 miles – the equivalent of one trip around ...
    May 27, 2015 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Sports
    Olympic Day at San Diego Rowing Club in Mission Beach features Olympians
    The San Diego Rowing Club, one of the nation’s oldest rowing clubs, will be holding its inaugural Olympic Day celebration at 10 a.m. Sunday, May 31 with local Olympians. Established in 1888, San Di...
    May 26, 2015 | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Opinion
    Santa Barbara spill: U.S. pipelines need better safety testing
    Last week an underground pipeline ruptured in Santa Barbara spewing about 105,000 gallons of oil. A nine-mile slick coated birds, killed sealife and blackened pristine beaches. The 28 year-old line...
    May 26, 2015 | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Arts & Entertainment
    Madonna coming to Valley View in Point Loma
    Madonna will make a stop in San Diego on her worldwide Rebel Heart tour this fall. The Material Girl is scheduled to perform at the Valley View Casino Center in Point Loma on Oct. 29. General publi...
    May 26, 2015 | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Business
    CREAM to open in Pacific Beach with free ice cream sandwiches
    CREAM, the San Francisco Bay-based dessert franchise that specializes in ice cream sandwiches using homemade cookies and other treats, is bringing the nostalgic dessert to Pacific Beach. To celebra...
    May 26, 2015 | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Obituaries
    Hats off to civic icon Esther Viti, 1932-2015
    Esther Viti, La Jolla’s “Hat Lady,” was impossible to miss. The chapeau-clad, wheelchair-bound Viti was omnipresent in the Jewel. She hosted community clean-ups and attended civic functions. She to...
    Apr 23, 2015 | 0 0 comments | 9 9 recommendations | email to a friend
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