test
Sdnews rss feed
    America's Schooner Cup returns to San Diego in April
    Mar 22, 2017 | 5932 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    America's Schooner Cup 2016 winner Lively leads Rose of Sharon into San Diego Bay. / Photo by Cynthia Sinclair
    America's Schooner Cup 2016 winner Lively leads Rose of Sharon into San Diego Bay. / Photo by Cynthia Sinclair
    slideshow
    Historic ships from throughout the country’s history will be showing off in San Diego Bay for the 29th running of America's Schooner Cup on Saturday, April 1. Hailing from Southern California and the Pacific Northwest, more than 12 schooners are expected to take the starting gun. The schooners range in length from 35 to 150 feet. Spectators may watch the start and finish off Shelter Island. No registration is necessary for those viewing from Shelter Island. Spectators should arrive at 11:15 a.m. Three groups of schooners will each start between 11:30 and noon. The race runs from Shelter Island, out of the bay and back and typically takes 2-3 hours. For those who want to be part of the action, three vessels will be taking a limited number of guests: - Californian – California's official state Tall Ship – a great option for those who want to participate in the race – sdmaritime.org; - Bill of Rights – a 136-foot replica of a 19th century coastal schooner – another lively option for those who want to participate in the race – schoonerbillofrights.com; - San Salvador – a replica of Juan Cabrillo's ship that first visited San Diego in 1542 – a fun option for spectators – sdmaritime.org. The race is hosted by Silver Gate Yacht Club, with all proceeds going to the Navy/Marine Corps Relief Society – a nonprofit whose mission is to help Navy and Marine families. The event will be supported by Star Clippers, a worldwide cruise ship company featuring tall ships.
    Comments
    (0)
    Comments-icon Post a Comment
    No Comments Yet
    Status of short-term vacation rentals in limbo
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Mar 20, 2017 | 13164 views | 1 1 comments | 9 9 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    The city's Smart Growth and Land Use Committee is scheduled to take up the vacation rental issue again March 24.
    The city's Smart Growth and Land Use Committee is scheduled to take up the vacation rental issue again March 24.
    slideshow
    The tide in the battle by beach residents seeking to restrict – or exclude – short-term vacation rentals in single-family neighborhoods may have turned with an about-face at the city attorney's office. Immediate past City Attorney Jan Goldsmith had maintained rules and regulations governing short-term vacation rentals were vague and needed clarification. New City Attorney Mara Elliott has taken a completely different tack with her March 15 issuance of a memorandum of law advising the City Council on the housing issue. "The city has a ‘permissive zoning ordinance,’” said Elliott's memorandum. “This means that any use that is not listed in the city's zoning ordinance is prohibited.” Elliott's memo subsequently pointed out, “Short-term vacation rentals are not specifically defined, expressly permitted, or listed in any of the zone use categories, including residential or commercial." The city attorney's memo came at a key time, just before the city's Smart Growth and Land Use Committee is scheduled to take up the vacation rental issue again March 24. Last November, following five hours of public testimony, a motion by then-City Council President Sherri Lightner, which some feel would have largely banned short-term vacation rentals in single-family neighborhoods, was defeated by a 7-2 vote. Lightner’s proposal would have restricted a homeowner's ability to rent to transients for less than 30 days in most single-family zones, with renters or owners of single-family homes also not able to rent out a room or space for less than seven days without proper permitting. An alternative motion brought by then-Councilmember, now-Assemblyman Todd Gloria was subsequently passed in November by the same 7-2 margin. His counter motion requested city staff do a fiscal analysis to determine the cost of greater stvr enforcement citywide, asked staff to draft and return with a comprehensive ordinance better defining and regulating short-term vacation rentals, as well as remanding the matter back to the City Council's Smart Growth and Land Use Committee for further consideration. Reacting to Elliott's pronouncement, 1st District Councilmember Barbary Bry said: "I was pleased to read the memo issued by City Attorney Mara Elliott confirming that short-term vacation rentals do not fall under any permissible use in the municipal code and are therefore prohibited in the city of San Diego. I look forward to working with my colleagues on the council to determine the best way to allow property owners to participate in home sharing.” Pacific Beach resident Ronan Gray, a spokesperson for Save San Diego Neighborhoods, a grassroots group opposed to short-term vacation rentals in single-family neighborhoods, called Elliott's comment a “game changer” in beginning to address noise, trash and other recurrent problems with short-term rentals. “Suddenly, these mini hotels that have been popping up are now illegal,” Gray said. “We bought our homes expecting to be living in residential, not commercial areas. This type of use is clearly commercial.” Gray added: “When you turn a home into a hotel – nobody wants to live there, it's just a constant stream of strangers and tourists. That's not what our neighborhoods are for.” Gary Wonacott, president of Mission Beach Town Council, located in an area where large numbers of short-term vacation rentals are present, said the beach community has taken a centrist approach to dealing with the issue. “While the MBTC membership has, on multiple occasions, expressed concern for the increase in the number of short-term rentals in Mission Beach in the past decade, and has voted for a minimum number of days allowed for a short-term rental, the Mission Beach community has historically embraced vacation rentals,” Wonacott said. “It is now a matter of working with the city to ensure that the final ordinance implemented by the city incorporates the features in the Mission Beach plan that tailor the requirements to the culture of this unique and special community in San Diego,” Wonacott said.
    Comments
    (1)
    Comments-icon Post a Comment
    PSJ13
    |
    23 Hours Ago
    I love this part: "the Mission Beach community has historically embraced vacation rentals,” Wonacott said.

    What community? There is no community in Mission Beach. That's the point! It's been taken over by STVRs. I think be "community" Wonacott is referring to the companies and absentee owners who run these former residences - now turned mini-hotels. Take a walk through MB. It's trashed - a shell of a community. A blighted tourist trap that used to be a neighborhood.

    Sundaes fundays at Kate Sessions Elementary in Pacific Beach
    Mar 16, 2017 | 9254 views | 0 0 comments | 14 14 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Principal Joseph and Miss Emerson were turned into human sundaes at Kate Sessions Elementary on March 6.
    Principal Joseph and Miss Emerson were turned into human sundaes at Kate Sessions Elementary on March 6.
    slideshow
    Principal Joseph and Miss Emerson fulfilled a promise to their students at Kate Sessions Elementary at a morning assembly on March 6 in front of the student body, faculty, and parents. The duo had promised the students that if they met the PTO's fundraising goal of $15,000 at the jog-a-thon they would allow the children to turn them into human sundaes. The students not only met the goal but exceeded the it and raised $16,400, which funds the library, music, art, and Spanish programs at the school. One by one, the students added more layers of ice cream, chocolate syrup,and cherries to the human sundae to the delight of the cheering crowd.
    Comments
    (0)
    Comments-icon Post a Comment
    No Comments Yet
    Smooth sailing ahead as Arts District at Liberty Station celebrates 10th anniversary
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Mar 16, 2017 | 14760 views | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Now through the rest of the year, the foundation is planning activities to honor the past, including an enhancement of Arts District signature events – monthly free Friday Night Liberty art walks, Salute the Season holiday events and seasonal block parties.
    Now through the rest of the year, the foundation is planning activities to honor the past, including an enhancement of Arts District signature events – monthly free Friday Night Liberty art walks, Salute the Season holiday events and seasonal block parties.
    slideshow
    The 10th anniversary of Liberty Station's Arts District is being celebrated throughout 2017 with a host of programs and activities on the former Naval Training Center's 100-acre campus. Now through the rest of the year, the foundation is planning activities to honor the past, including an enhancement of Arts District signature events – monthly free Friday Night Liberty art walks, Salute the Season holiday events and seasonal block parties. New anchor events will include a free summer concert series, a Saturday night cinema series, art installations at Liberty Station and temporary art exhibits throughout the grounds. The Arts District has “unfolded” over the past decade thanks to the leadership of the NTC Foundation, a nonprofit established in 2000 by the City of San Diego. Empowered to make the proposed Arts District a reality, the group has accomplished exactly that. But it hasn't been easy, admitted the foundation's executive director, Alan Ziter. To see how far the district's come, Ziter noted you have to look back at how it all started. “What was given to the NTC Foundation by the city were 26 abandoned Navy buildings, all in various states and conditions – and no money – and they said, 'Go ahead and make an arts district out of this,' ” said Ziter. “So the NTC board in 2000 really had to assess what could fit in these first 16 buildings, what they could be used for, how much it would cost to renovate them, and who could make a home here.” Today, with 16 of 26 historic buildings completed in Liberty Station, the Arts District is home to more than 80 tenants including dance companies, galleries, creative businesses, museums, and nonprofits. More than 500,000 people visit the Arts District annually, adding $41 million of economic impact and 706 jobs to the region. Two Arts District tenants, artist Lauren LeVieux and the San Diego Dance Theater, praised the Arts District as a venue of opportunity. “For two years in Barracks 15 Studio 203, I have asked myself how to turn part of an outdoor breezeway built in the 1920s into my art,” said Lauren LeVieux. “I wanted to create art there, show art there, and I wanted my studio to be art. “Countless paintings completed, 24 First Friday Events, two tree lightings, two block parties, and two Halloween parties have brought people of all types to see my work … During my two years at Liberty Station, collaboration opportunities have come my way. Among them, a chance to work with San Diego Repertory Theater and develop custom art to complement a play,” LeVieux said. “Later I was invited to curate a series of group shows in the Command Center at Liberty Station in order to get the resident artists’ work into a common space where the variety and quality of artwork could be visible … I also had a chance to set up a table in the Public Market every Tuesday morning,” LeVieux added. “Being part of this artistic community has really evolved the programming that we offer,” said Matt Carney, executive director of San Diego Dance Theater. “In the past we would mostly just produce our own shows by our artistic director and resident choreographer. “Now we are helping to promote and produce a community of artists from San Diego and beyond. An example of this is our 10-day dance festival, Live Arts Fest, where we produce 10 evenings of dance showcasing a different group each night.” Noting that redeveloping Liberty Station has been a challenge given the architectural limitations imposed by the historically designated former Naval base, Ziter talked about Arts District changes yet to come. “Ideally we'll have a 300-seat performance venue, as well as more art installations,” he said, adding, “The key thing here is the money. Historical building are expensive to renovate.” Ziter said funding to renovate Arts District buildings comes from a number of sources, including historical tax credits, private donations, financing a mortgage and fundraising. “Going forward, we'll be looking for development partners,” said Ziter. “We would talk with any developer who has a compelling idea that aligns with our mission of creating a vibrant arts district.” Arts District activities To learn more and view a calendar of Arts District 10th anniversary season activities, visit www.ntcfoundation.org/celebrating-10-years.
    Comments
    (0)
    Comments-icon Post a Comment
    No Comments Yet
    Lifeguard union at odds with San Diego Fire-Rescue
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Mar 15, 2017 | 6280 views | 0 0 comments | 14 14 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    A lifeguard vehicle parked next to the berm in Pacific Beach at sunset. / PHOTO BY THOMAS MELVILLE
    A lifeguard vehicle parked next to the berm in Pacific Beach at sunset. / PHOTO BY THOMAS MELVILLE
    slideshow
    An impasse between the lifeguard's union and San Diego Fire-Rescue over how water-related emergency calls are routed has lifeguards talking secession. SDFD chief Brian Fennessy recently changed the way radio dispatch works. All water-related 911 calls now go first to the fire department, instead of going directly to lifeguards, who've historically made all water rescues. Lifeguard union chief Ed Harris contends that the change adds a step slowing down the lifeguards' emergency response time. The origin of the SDFD internal dispute is not hard to trace. Harris can pinpoint the exact day, Jan. 21, and one particular incident that brought the contentious issue into sharp relief. “During extremely large surf, a woman was washed off the rocks and into the ocean by the Red Tile rip at 437 Coast Blvd.,” Harris said. “While guards were available, they did not know a woman was in distress. She was rescued by a citizen, then brought to the road for assistance. Fire-Rescue called lifeguards five minutes after the 911 call was made and asked if we were aware of the call. The lifeguard dispatcher said no. “The call was not transferred to lifeguard dispatch due to changes imposed by the San Diego Fire chief,” Harris continued. “The changes require police to transfer some water emergencies to Fire-Rescue dispatch, rather than lifeguard dispatch, as it has been done for more than 30 years. While most (responses) are not delayed five minutes, all water emergency calls routed through Fire-Rescue dispatch are now delayed 1-2 minutes before lifeguards are called.” Lifeguard union members have since filed a grievance in opposition to the recent radio-call routing changes with San Diego Mayor Kevin Faulconer. In response to the lifeguards' challenge to emergency call dispatch changes, Fennessy replied: “SDFD’s mission is to protect life, property and the environment. The Lifeguard Division is a key component of our success providing seamless services to community members. We understand the tremendous value they bring in their everyday interactions with everyone who works, lives near or visits our coastal areas. “When someone calls for help, responding quickly with the right resources remains our focus,” continued Fennessy. “Developing a new department would not provide any demonstrable benefit to the community members we serve. We will continue to work with all employees and stakeholders on innovative programs and projects to improve the services we provide.” Noting SDFD is “in the business of saving lives and keeping our neighborhoods safe,” Fennessy, added, “That was never more evident than during the recent storms when lifeguards and firefighters worked together for the common good and saved lives. “It’s unfortunate that Local 911 leadership would suggest public safety has been compromised in some way to score political points. Nothing could be further from the truth. Using scare tactics like that as a public safety professional is irresponsible and dangerous. “Statewide, the services that local lifeguards provide fall within the scope of local fire departments. Creating a separate department for lifeguards would be unprecedented, do nothing to improve public safety and increase costs. We are going to continue to respond as one department, and not let politics get in the way of doing the right thing for the public we are sworn to serve.” Harris noted that lifeguards and fire have been collaboratively linked since the '40s when “it was determined it would be a good fit.” He said lifeguards were subsequently moved out of the city's park and recreation department and placed with fire. Harris noted the lifeguard department is unique, for a variety of reasons, including the sheer volume of calls and rescues they deal with. “We have about 300 personnel who've made about 9,000 water and 300 cliff rescues the last six years,” Harris said. “We work with fire, and we call them when we need them. But we don't need 18 firefighters showing up on every call.” Harris contends Fennessy was out of step in instituting the new call routing system “without consulting the lifeguards.” The mayor will now investigate the change Fennessy instituted with water-related emergency calls. “The mayor will make a determination as to whether Fennessy can do what he's doing (with emergency calls),” said Harris. “If the mayor's office doesn't uphold our grievance, then it will move to the City Council.” What if the lifeguard union's demands to go back to the old emergency call-routing system are not met? “We'll be having those conversations (about seceding from SDFD) with our members to try and get them to understand we're not happy (with new emergency call system), and we don't think the public is safe,” concluded Harris.
    Comments
    (0)
    Comments-icon Post a Comment
    No Comments Yet
    News
    World fusion and flamenco with acoustic guitar duo Strunz & Farah at Humphreys Backstage Live
    Grammy-nominated acoustic guitar duo, Strunz & Farah, will perform two shows at Humphreys Backstage Live on April 1. Formed in 1980, from the ashes of underrated Latin jazz band Caldera, the pair p...
    Published - Thursday, March 23
    full story
    Mission Bay spring sports off and running
    As winter turned to spring to start this week, it should come as no surprise that the spring sports teams at Mission Bay High are off and running. Volleyball On the volleyball scene, the boys team ...
    Published - Thursday, March 23
    full story
    Teen dies from influenza in San Diego County
    A 17-year-old girl died from influenza and is the first pediatric flu death reported this season, the County Health and Human Services Agency announced March 22. The teen died Feb. 25, from influen...
    Published - Wednesday, March 22
    full story
    Clairemont man convicted of murdering Pacific Beach woman
    A jury has convicted a Clairemont man of second-degree murder in the beating death of a Pacific Beach woman who died from multiple blunt force injury to her head. David Charles Ashton, 63, was conv...
    Published - Wednesday, March 22
    full story
    Airport Authority approves new Federal Inspection Services facility
    The San Diego County Regional Airport Authority board on March 2 voted to move forward construction of a new Federal Inspection Services facility (to house Customs and Border Protection, and other ...
    Published - Wednesday, March 22
    full story
    Mission Beach boat sinkers receive 18 months probation
    Two Mission Beach businessmen were placed on 18 months federal probation Monday and they have paid the U.S. Coast Guard $18,000 for rescuing them after they intentionally sank their boat to try and...
    Published - Tuesday, March 21
    full story
    Bottoms up: New Pathway Ale benefits bike riders in Pacific Beach
    Two Pacific Beach breweries, Karl Strauss Brewing Co. and Amplified Ale Works, recently teamed to brew something special, a new milky stout Pathway Ale, to help raise funding for the PB Pathways pr...
    Published - Tuesday, March 21
    full story
    San Diego fire chief counters lifeguards' claims about emergency calls
    San Diego Fire Chief Brian Fennessy refuted allegations by the lifeguards’ union that a recent change to how water-related emergency calls are handled slows down lifeguard response times jeopardizi...
    Published - Tuesday, March 21
    full story
    Judge rules Guerrero mentally competent for trial
    A judge on March 20 determined Jon David Guerrero is mentally competent to stand trial for three bizarre murders of homeless men in Ocean Beach, Mission Bay, and downtown. San Diego Superior Court ...
    Published - Monday, March 20
    full story
    Letter to editor: Homeless population can be better citizens
    First and foremost, I would like to thank anyone taking a moment to read this letter. You are the basis of why I want this to work. I know first hand (because I’m out here too) just how difficult i...
    Published - Monday, March 20
    full story
    Ocean Beach youngster seams to be sewing a career
    Aspiring seamstress Caroline Austin's passion for the craft matches her talent. Which is why Ocean Beach seamstress Mary Ann Haskell has taken the 11-year-old under her wing. For the past two years...
    Published - Sunday, March 19
    full story
    San Diego Police unveil device to test for marijuana at traffic stops
    San Diego Police Chief Shelley Zimmerman on March 16 unveiled a mobile, saliva-screening device, Drager 5000, to test for illicit drugs including cocaine, marijuana, amphetamines and prescription n...
    Published - Friday, March 17
    full story
    Man shot in arm in Pacific Beach
    An 18 year old victim was at a house party at 3400 Riviera Drive about 10:25 p.m. on Thursday, March 16. He left the party and went down the street to 1500 La Cima Drive where he was going to buy s...
    Published - Friday, March 17
    full story
    Sometimes karaoke leads to a career in music
    While it’s likely that most folks reading this have partaken in a round of karaoke at some point in their lives, the number of folks for whom such a performance actually led to a musical career is ...
    Published - Friday, March 17
    full story
    Current Issues(Archives)
    The Peninsula Beacon, March 16th, 2017
    download The Peninsula Beacon, March 16th, 2017
    The Peninsula Beacon, March 16th, 2017
    La Jolla Village News, March 10th, 2017
    download La Jolla Village News, March 10th, 2017
    La Jolla Village News, March 10th, 2017
    Beach & Bay Press, March 9th, 2017
    download Beach & Bay Press, March 9th, 2017
    Beach & Bay Press, March 9th, 2017
    The Peninsula Beacon, March 2nd, 2017
    download The Peninsula Beacon, March 2nd, 2017
    The Peninsula Beacon, March 2nd, 2017