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    Class of 2016 graduates from Mission Bay High
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Jun 22, 2016 | 5333 views | 0 0 comments | 10 10 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Caps fly in the air as Mission Bay High's Class of 2016 graduates on Tuesday, June 21. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Caps fly in the air as Mission Bay High's Class of 2016 graduates on Tuesday, June 21. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    A near-capacity crowd turned out June 21 to witness Mission Bay High School's Class of 2016 graduate. Commencement exercises at the school's new stadium were infused with a fun and lighthearted spirit as MBHS seniors, in the words of principal Ernest Remillard, transformed into “alumni.” “I wanted to let you know how proud I am of each and every one of you,” said Remillard, who was also principle for some of the graduating class's seniors previously at Pacific Beach Middle School. “I am confident that they'll take their experiences and memories with them as they depart on their next journey.” Remillard thanked his staff personally for aiding him in helping “this terrific group of young men and women.” “Please remember: Always be respectful, and appreciate your life experiences,” Remillard counseled the graduating class. At the start of the ceremony ASB and class president Victoria Grabowski told the crowd she hoped the ceremony “wouldn't be too long or boring,” then sat down. “I actually thought that speech was going to be a little longer,” responded Remillard. “We are one big, truly happy family,” said senior class vice-president Donald (Ozzie) Osborne. He concluded with a quote from NFL Hall of Fame linebacker Ray Lewis who said, “Leave your mark to endure.” Co-valedictorians Hannah Bloom and Kyra Forsyth, as well as salutatorian Dan Tran, gave commencement speeches. Bloom, the captain of girls softball team who will be playing the sport in college, said the old adage that “the more things change, the more they stay the same,” doesn't apply to MBHS. “MBHS with its International Bacclaureate (IB) program and new sports complex is now the envy of all high schools in San Diego Unified School District,” said Bloom, citing all of her instructors for contributing to students' success noting, “They never get the credit they truly deserve.” Forsyth spoke about 10 “lessons” she'd learned at MBHS. Her list included being honest, having a positive attitude, trying not to procrastinate, not being afraid to ask for help and learning to prioritize. “No matter what you do, be you,” advised Forsyth, adding, “Don't listen to what other people tell you about you, because they aren't – and never will be – you.” Tran, whom principle Remillard referred to as “always having a smile on his face,” discussed procrastination. “Don't just wait around doing nothing until something happens,” Tran said. “You have to be proactive with your life.” SDUSD board president Dr. Michael McQuary accepted MBHS's Class of 2016 and put everything in perspective during his remarks. “There are 60 million students in K-12 schools in 27,000 high schools throughout the nation,” said McQuary, adding “there are six million students in California and 133,000 students in SDUSD in 25 high schools.” McQuary noted that MBHS's 2016 class of 215 graduates “are a big part of making a difference, not only in this community, city and state, but in the nation and the world.” The school board president noted this was a record-setting year at SDUSD pointing out the district, the second largest in the state, had a “92 percent average of all students graduating,” which he added is “the highest percentage of any urban high school in the state of California and the nation.” McQuary added the Class of 2016 was also exceptional given the diversity of SDUSD and the large number of English as a second language students which it enrolls.
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    Ocean Beach Street Fair and Chili Cook-Off set for June 25
    Jun 17, 2016 | 35910 views | 0 0 comments | 9 9 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Thousands will flock to Ocean Beach to enjoy food, drinks, chili, live music, art and great people watching at the 37th annual Ocean Beach Street Fair and Chili Cook-Off Festival on Saturday, June 25. / Photo by Jim Grant
    Thousands will flock to Ocean Beach to enjoy food, drinks, chili, live music, art and great people watching at the 37th annual Ocean Beach Street Fair and Chili Cook-Off Festival on Saturday, June 25. / Photo by Jim Grant
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    Thousands will flock to Ocean Beach to enjoy food, drinks, chili, live music, art and great people watching at the 37th annual Ocean Beach Street Fair and Chili Cook-Off Festival on Saturday, June 25. The free festival will include an oceanfront chili cook-off, vendor and food booths, Artists Alley, a beachside beer garden, live music and entertainment, family friendly activities, carnival rides and games, art, the Community Mural Project and more. The street fair will take place from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. in the 4800 to 5000 blocks of Newport Avenue, along the waterfront and in the pier parking lot, and along the cross streets of Newport Avenue at Bacon Street and Cable Street. Free trolley services will run for people parking near Robb Field (every 30 minutes) and on Sea World Drive at Pacific Coast Highway (every hour) from 9:30 a.m.to 9 p.m. There will also be a free bike valet at the intersection of Bacon Street and Newport Avenue, courtesy of the San Diego County Bicycle Coalition. The highlight of this year's fest will be the 50th anniversary celebration of the OB Pier, which opened on July 2, 1966. Ocean Beach MainStreet Association will commemorate the pier with photos dating back to its inception in 1966, and information about the OB Pier’s rich history in partnership with the Ocean Beach Historical Society. Other pier activities will include a kids fishing game, photo kiosk with a lifesize photo backdrop of the pier’s opening celebration in 1966, Living Coast Discovery Center’s interactive crab display and the opportunity to sign up for the San Diego Junior Lifeguard Foundation’s annual pier jump. The Kiss tribute band will be back to rally the crowd. This time they'll support the Year of the Pier by donning their ’60s surfer best and rocking out to the Beach Boys. Attendees can stop by Rock and Roll San Diego’s booth to get a free 15-minute music lesson alongside the wild and zany Kiss tribute band, as they’re dressed in full face painting with long hair and Hawaiian shirts. The booth will also have drawings, giveaways and loads of cool stuff. The chili competition will feature more than 20 tastings from amateur entrants competing for the titles of Hottest Chili, Judges’ Award and the grand prize winner: People’s Choice Award. Chili tastings will begin at 11 a.m. and will end when contestants run out of samples. Tastings can be purchased for $2 per chili entry, or attendees can buy a master ticket for $20 to try every recipe and vote for the best. The Hodad’s Burger-Eating Competition is back by popular demand offering contestants a chance to be featured on the Hodad’s Wall of Fame at its Ocean Beach site. The Bloody Mary competition will also make a return with 15 local restaurants and bars competing for the title of Best Bloody Mary in Ocean Beach. Tickets can be purchased for $20 to sample each entry and vote for your favorites. Children and adults of all ages are welcome to purchase a $10 square to contribute to this year’s Community Mural Project. Visit the mural area on Bacon Street just south of Newport to reserve and then paint your square. After the Street Fair, the murals are sealed and installed in the community. On Cable Street, Artists Alley will feature accomplished artists and their handcrafted items. Family-friendly attractions include the Wonderland Fun Zone in the parking lot adjacent to US Bank near Sunset Cliffs Boulevard and Newport Avenue. The Zone will have a 20-foot slide, OB Express Train Ride for the little ones, Zip Line, Zorb balls, Hop ’n’ Rock, laser tag, kids games and more. There will be five stages of nonstop music throughout the day. Music genres include acoustic, rock, blues, alternative, Americana and more. For more information, visit www.oceanbeachsandiego.com.
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    After 440 career wins, Mission Bay's coach Kane retires
    Jun 17, 2016 | 948 views | 0 0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Coach Dennis Kane on the Mission Bay High School sideline.
    Coach Dennis Kane on the Mission Bay High School sideline.
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    If you attended a Mission Bay High boys basketball game over the last decade-plus, you saw a familiar face on the Bucs sideline game after game. While that face won’t be there in a coaching capacity moving forward, the lessons that he taught many young men over time will in all likelihood remain for years to come on and off the court. Dennis Kane, who recently retired from the coaching ranks with a remarkable 440 career wins (at several schools), has just about done and seen everything when it comes to high school basketball in San Diego, a coaching career that goes back to the early 1970s. Ranked sixth all-time in wins in San Diego boys basketball history, Kane captured six league titles and one CIF title (2007 at Mission Bay) along the way. His stepping down allows Mission Bay High assistant coach Marshawn Cherry to lead the Bucs moving forward. Kane, a counselor at MBHS, who also coached at San Diego High and Kearny High, recently spoke via email about not only his time spent at Mission Bay High, but his long tenure as a coach in general. BBP: What led you to decide to retire? DK: I need to exhale and smell the rose for a while. Since 1972, I have known where I was going to be every Thanksgiving and Christmas. I have no regrets about the commitment and dedication I have shown to my chosen profession, but I want a better balance between my love and passion for kids and basketball and my desire to make some personal lifetime memories. BBP: What are some memories you will take from having been Mission Bay High’s boys basketball coach? DK: As always, the kids, the staff, the people, the trial and tribulations, the elation and joy of teaching and coaching. And as they used to say on ABC’s “Wide World of Sports” “the thrill of victory and the agony of defeat.” BBP: What has Mission Bay High meant to you after all these years? DK: That’s a hard one, like asking, “What have your children meant to you after all of these years?” I guess the answer would be the most joyous and most frustrating experience I ever had all happening at the same time. BBP: For anyone who might think of getting into coaching today, what advice do you have for them? DK: Get ready for the ride of your life, a totally rewarding yet demanding position that will test you in every way. When it came to giving his all to the game of basketball and caring about countless kids along the way, Kane hit more than his share of successful shots.
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    Mission Bay’s co-valedictorians and salutatorian have high hopes
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Jun 13, 2016 | 6524 views | 0 0 comments | 12 12 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Co-valedictorians Hannah Bloom and Kyra Forsyth bookend salutatorian Dan Tran at Mission Bay High School. / Photo by Dave Schwab
    Co-valedictorians Hannah Bloom and Kyra Forsyth bookend salutatorian Dan Tran at Mission Bay High School. / Photo by Dave Schwab
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    Mission Bay High School's co-valedictorians and salutatorian for 2016 all have a math and science bent; wanting to be a geneticist, a neurologist and a computer engineer/math teacher, respectively. Co-valedictorians Kyra Forsyth and Hannah Bloom, both of Pacific Beach, and salutatorian Dan Tran, of Mira Misa, talked recently about their school days, their future plans and the state of the world in a far-ranging interview with Beach & Bay Press. All three students are presently busy drafting their required five-minute speeches for the June 21 commencement at MBHS. Is that tough? “I wanted to make something that everyone could relate to, but not be super bored by,” said Forsyth adding “hopefully, they're going to laugh at. That was the hardest thing: making something funny so people would stay amused and entertained.” “It's hard to be inspiring this time of year,” noted Bloom, adding her speech will be “more along the lines of what to take from these past four years, especially the last two, while giving credit where it's due, to our teachers and those who helped us along the way.” “For my speech, what I wrote about was something we all have in common: self-procrastination,” said Tran. “So I wrote something about that, and linked it to how it could be used in the future.” All three MBHS grads are going to universities: Forsyth to UCLA, Bloom to Washington in St. Louis, and Tran to UCSD. Forsyth and Bloom had high praise for the International Baccalaureate (IB) Program taught at MBHS and at Kate Sessions Elementary and Pacific Beach Middle in the Mission Bay Cluster of the San Diego Unified School District (SDUSD). “It's huge,” said Bloom of the IB Program. “It's transformed the reputation MBHS had when you know that La Jolla wants to become an IB school — and they can't.” “You're not just studying for the sake of taking a class, because the majority of classes are two years,” said Forsyth. “You also make a lot of connections (with classmates) to retain more knowledge.” “It helps connect people from around the world,” added Bloom of the IB Program. “It lets everybody learn the same things in a way that is more open-minded.” MBHS is a diverse school with lots of students bussed in from outside Pacific Beach. All three MBHS grads thought that was a big plus. Tran noted coming from elsewhere made MBHS a transition for him initially tough because, “I didn't know anyone.” Bloom said the socio-ethnic student population makes MBHS “an entirely different atmosphere than you would expect. You meet more people that help shape you in ways you don't expect.” As students in the information age, all three grads agree technology will continue to shape their futures. “As the saying goes, 'There's nowhere to go but up,” said Forsyth. “Technology is helping people connect so much more. It's opening up more opportunities to people.” “My dad and I joked that there's more technology in our cell phones now than there was on the very first shuttle to the moon,” said Bloom. “Hopefully, we can use technology to fix things, like global warming,” said Tran. “Unfortunately, it (climate change) is on such a huge scale.” Asked what they're looking forward to most, Forsyth said, “The long-run plan is just to do something that makes me happy. If I'm happy – things will just fall into place.” “If everything goes according to plan, I hope to get into a Ph.D program,” said Bloom adding “My dream job is to work at NASA.” “I just want to live comfortably,” noted Tran. Concerning what they'll miss most about MBHS, Tran said, “My friends.” “My friends, and the sports teams,” said Forsyth. “The teachers,” said Bloom. “They're such an influence to us all.” Bloom confessed her belief that MBHS “is on the rise.” “Other schools need to take notice over these next few years,” she said, “because the next (graduating class) from PB Middle School will be the biggest group of local kids to come here. Mission Bay is a force to be reckoned with.”
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    The Shack is back – now bigger and stronger
    by LAINIE FRASER
    Jun 09, 2016 | 15140 views | 2 2 comments | 8 8 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Izzy Poulin, of La Jolla, walks past the restored Windansea Shack (sans palm fronds) on Saturday morning on her way out to surf. Friends of Windansea say the fronds will be added in July. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Izzy Poulin, of La Jolla, walks past the restored Windansea Shack (sans palm fronds) on Saturday morning on her way out to surf. Friends of Windansea say the fronds will be added in July. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    The Windansea Shack turns 70 this year and – except for the palm frond roof – has been fully restored by volunteers after being pummeled by a storm last Christmas. “It took one amazing crew and three weekends, but we have rebuilt it,” said Melinda Merryweather, vice president of Friends of Windansea. The Shack is a historic landmark on the Windansea Beach in La Jolla and it has officially been restored following the hard hit it took from a storm last year. Credit for the restoration goes to a nonprofit and the community. “We all remember that storm with the high tide, full moon and surf all at once,” Merryweather said. According to Merryweather, on Christmas eve last year, San Diego was weathering El Nino, a strong full moon and an extremely high tide. Prior to the storm, the normal precautions were taken for the Shack. All low hanging fronds were trimmed but it wasn't enough. A massive wave rose up and crashed down on the Shack. The force of the wave and the weight of the water knocked out one of the supporting legs. The restoration was lead by Jim Neri the president of Friends of Windansea and a landscaper. Friends of Windansea is a nonprofit based in La Jolla that asked the city for permission to take care of and maintain the Shack in 1998. The nonprofit is dedicated to caring for the Shack and has a strong presence in the community. With volunteers from around La Jolla they were able to rebuild the Shack. According to Merryweather, it was no surprise that the community came together to help rebuild the landmark. “The Shack is historic, it is very local, it is like our church,” Merryweather said. “It really has a super meaning to La Jolla.” The restored Shack has legs made of cured eucalyptus that are thicker and installed deeper in the ground than before. “We are confident in the new structure and protection plans,” Merryweather said. “The community has and will work hard to keep this piece of history here.” There are new preparation measures in place for the shack as well. According to Merryweather, following the Christmas parade in La Jolla, all of the fronds and the roof will be removed from the Shack and will not be replaced until the rainy season has ended sometime in July. “The city has entrusted us with this Shack and we are all more than honored to do the work,” Merryweather said. The Windansea Shack was built 70 years ago originally to provide shade for the women and children watching the surfers. In 1998, with Merryweather’s help, the Shack was made a historic landmark. Today, the Shack stands as a symbol of the surfing community and La Jolla itself.
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    windansea_rn
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    June 07, 2016
    I think you have dramatically overestimated the severity and length of our "rainy season" and I feel earlier Windansea generations would disapprove of The Shack retaining its iconic look during high tourist season only.
    MyWordPressGuy
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    June 07, 2016
    This is awesome news...thanks to the die-hard La Jollans responsible for keeping Our Shack alive! It's been a psychic gut-punch every time I drove by and saw the hole where it used to be!
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    Jun 26, 2016 | 0 0 comments | 7 7 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Sports
    Little League post-season all-star tournaments under way
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    Jun 24, 2016 | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Jun 09, 2016 | 0 0 comments | 13 13 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Arts & Entertainment
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    The annual Ocean Beach Street Fair has many things going for it, including great weather, proximity to the beach and of course, the chili, but without a doubt the biggest draw is the music. Music f...
    Jun 24, 2016 | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Business
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    Jun 24, 2016 | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Obituaries
    Raul Cadena
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    Jun 24, 2016 | 0 0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Ocean Beach Street Fair & Chili Cook-Off Guide 2016
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