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    Mothers and daughters in harmony for charity at MADCAPS show
    by SCOTT HOPKINS
    Feb 03, 2016 | 27691 views | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Members of MADCAPS rehearse musical numbers for the group's 56th annual music and dance show Thursday through Saturday, March 10 to 12, at Point Loma Nazarene University. Tickets for the popular performances go on sale Feb. 9.
    Members of MADCAPS rehearse musical numbers for the group's 56th annual music and dance show Thursday through Saturday, March 10 to 12, at Point Loma Nazarene University. Tickets for the popular performances go on sale Feb. 9.
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    One of the community's oldest organizations is preparing to stage its annual music and dance review involving a cast of hundreds of local teens. This is the 56th year that MADCAPS (Mothers and Daughters Club Assisting Philanthropies) has entertained audiences while raising funds for charities selected by the young ladies themselves. Months of rehearsals will culminate in "MADCAPS, in Harmony with San Diego," the theme of this year's show, to be staged Thursday through Saturday, March 10 to 12, at Brown Chapel on the campus of Point Loma Nazarene University. Dozens of local young men are also featured in the production. Tickets for the popular show, which features singing, several types of dance and a farewell to graduating members, will go on sale Tuesday, Feb. 9, and range from $5 to $25 each. They can be purchased at sdmadcaps.org. "We are particularly excited about this year's theme," said Kate McKenzie, 2016 benefit communications chair of the group. "It focuses on our local community, where our boots are on the ground making a difference. An exciting new feature of the show is stage appearances by representatives of the philanthropies we support. This year, we are very pleased to welcome San Diego Habitat for Humanity, St. Vincent de Paul and San Diego Therapeutic Recreational Services to say a few words to our patrons." MADCAPS is also supporting an outreach to homeless kids led by PLNU and San Diego First Church by collecting items for kits to be distributed to those in need. Patrons are asked to bring items such as tube socks and small shampoo bottles. Community sponsors this year include Meguiar's Inc., Erin and Jim Schabarum, the Brick Youth Group of Point Loma Community Presbyterian Church and the MADCAPS Class of 2016. MADCAPS is a group of about 180 mothers and their daughters in grades 7 through 12 who live in the Point Loma, Ocean Beach, Mission Hills and Hillcrest areas. They provide direct services and donations to many area charitable organizations. Each year's new class selects charities to assist as they grow, contributing thousands of volunteer hours each year. Since its inception in 1960, the group has raised more than $828,000 in addition to the invaluable volunteer services of its members. All MADCAPS members also volunteer annually at the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer 3-Day Walk and Autism Speaks. More information is available at the group website above or by contacting McKenzie at (619) 399-9839 or kate.mckenzie@cox.net.
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    Torrey Pines' trees no match for Jan. 31 winds
    Feb 02, 2016 | 4658 views | 0 0 comments | 6 6 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    One of Torrey Pines Golf Course's most iconic trees, seeded at the 15th hole, collapsed during a fierce winter storm Jan. 31. The winds, which reached gusts of up to 60 miles an hour, blew down the massive eucalyptus after the golf course had been closed for the day. Farmers Insurance Open play was suspended Jan. 31 in the face of the storm, which leveled dozens of trees and power poles and tore away rooftops across California. Several Torrey pines were damaged as well. The Torrey pine, an endangered species, grows up to 56 feet and only on the Torrey Pines State Natural Reserve, a bluff overlooking the Pacific Ocean, and one of the Channel Islands.
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    San Diego fans reach fever pitch for U.S. women's national team
    by SCOTT HOPKINS
    Jan 25, 2016 | 37383 views | 0 0 comments | 15 15 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    More than 23,000 soccer fans came by the thousands to cheer the U.S. women's national team in a rare San Diego appearance against Ireland's finest in a Jan. 23 friendly match at Qualcomm Stadium. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    More than 23,000 soccer fans came by the thousands to cheer the U.S. women's national team in a rare San Diego appearance against Ireland's finest in a Jan. 23 friendly match at Qualcomm Stadium. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    Fans react to Carli Lloyd's first goal during the U.S. women's 5-0 win over Ireland. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Fans react to Carli Lloyd's first goal during the U.S. women's 5-0 win over Ireland. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    Carli Lloyd scored three goals in the U.S. women's 5-0 win over Ireland. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Carli Lloyd scored three goals in the U.S. women's 5-0 win over Ireland. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    Alex Morgan became the 34th player in history to play 100 times for her country. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Alex Morgan became the 34th player in history to play 100 times for her country. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    Carli Lloyd and Alex Morgan celebrate Lloyd's first goal in which Morgan assisted on. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Carli Lloyd and Alex Morgan celebrate Lloyd's first goal in which Morgan assisted on. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    Meghan Klingenberg attempts to dribble into the box against Ireland. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Meghan Klingenberg attempts to dribble into the box against Ireland. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    The fans celebrate the U.S. women's national team during their win over Ireland at Qualcomm Stadium. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    The fans celebrate the U.S. women's national team during their win over Ireland at Qualcomm Stadium. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    An army of aroused soccer fans came by the thousands to cheer the U.S. women's national team in a rare San Diego appearance against Ireland's finest in a Jan. 23 friendly match at Qualcomm Stadium, and a dominating 5-0 U.S. victory sent them home even happier. The myriad of clothing and headwear in the stands included those with U.S. flags draped over their shoulders or wearing garments containing red, white and blue and was only broken by those adorned in pricey replica jerseys with the names of their favorite players. Many of these names achieved household status last July 5 when the U.S. electrified soccer enthusiasts around the world with a stunning display of power in a memorable 5-2 defeat of Japan for the World Cup. And here they were, competing on the local pitch in their all white kits, led by all-world star midfielder Carli Lloyd, goalkeeper Hope Solo, forward Alex Morgan, defenders Meghan Klingenberg and Ali Krieger. Lines at merchandise stands outside stadium gates were long as fans awaited their opportunity to buy items ranging from T-shirts to six-foot-long scarves with the motto "One Nation, One Team" printed on them. And those who were late getting to their seats missed the first U.S. goal, as Morgan sent a 6th minute cross to an unmarked Lloyd, who had an open net from about five yards away. Then, in the 22nd minute, Lloyd again found herself in perfect position as a pass in the goal mouth was headed into the air. She leaped to send the ball into the net milliseconds before an Irish defender's head collided with her chin, sending both women to the turf for treatment. Returning to the match in the 25th minute, Lloyd completed her sixth career hat trick in the 29th minute when the Irish goalkeeper misplayed a ball, leaving her with a look at a wide-open net from 20 yards, her 82nd international goal. At that point, the score was effectively Lloyd 3, Ireland 0, and the crowd's passionate cheering increased with every offensive possibility or defensive rejection. Lloyd sat out the second half as USWNT coach Jill Ellis sent six substitutes into the game, with one making history. Forward Mallory Pugh made her debut with the national team in the 58th minute at the age of 17 years, 9 months. And Pugh made the most of her first appearance. In the 84th minute she scored the final U.S. goal, becoming only the 19th player to score in their debut. Current teammates Stephanie McCaffrey and Christen Press, who assisted on the goal, also achieved this feat. Another notable moment came in the final minute of the first half when Morgan, playing in her 100th career match with the team, scored her 57th career goal on an assist by Lloyd. Among the more interesting groups in the crowd was a large contingent in field level section 19, where a group of young men somehow got through stadium security with three massive bass drums, which they managed to pound on with unending energy from pre-game warmups until after the final whistle. Dozens of energized voices sang soccer-related lyrics to such diverse tunes as "Yankee Doodle Dandy," Little Peggy March's 1963 teen hit "I Will Follow Him" and The Ramones' 1976 rocker "Blitzkrieg Bop." You won't witness this at a Chargers or Padres game! Following the match, hundreds of fans waited for more than an hour until the U.S. players, wheeling suitcases, appeared in a stadium tunnel, walking to a waiting bus. Sharpies and other writing instruments were in abundance as persons of all ages sought autographs on soccer balls and a selection of clothing and jerseys. In a post-match press conference, Ellis praised her team's work rate and level of preparation for upcoming events including the Olympic Qualifying Championship set for Feb. 10 to 21 in Houston and Frisco, Texas. The U.S. team opens in Group A against Costa Rica Feb. 10 at 5:30 p.m. (PST). Others in the group are Puerto Rico and Mexico. Group B includes Canada, Guatemala, Trinidad and Tobago and Guyana. The top two teams from these eight will qualify for the 2016 Olympic Summer Games in Brazil where rosters are limited to only 18 players. NOTES: - The crowd of 23,309 nearly doubled the previous best total in five San Diego appearances by the USWNT, the first four of which were played at the University of San Diego stadium. - For USWNT goalkeeper Solo, the game marked her 91st shutout and 143rd win, most in U.S. history, in 186 matches. - The match marked Lloyd's 212th appearance.  - Since the start of 2015, the USWNT is 21-2-4, scoring 79 goals while yielding only 12. - In the series with Ireland, the U.S. is now 12-0-0. - Morgan becomes the 34th player in history to play 100 times for her country. Retired midfielder Kristine Lilly holds the record with 352 caps.
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    26th annual Jewish Film Festival: Everybody knows their names
    by MARTIN JONES WESTLIN
    Jan 25, 2016 | 1694 views | 0 0 comments | 14 14 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Richard Alpert, known in popular culture as Ram Dass, embraced his Judaism when he reasoned he wasn't born into it by accident. PHOTO CONTRIBUTED
    Richard Alpert, known in popular culture as Ram Dass, embraced his Judaism when he reasoned he wasn't born into it by accident. PHOTO CONTRIBUTED
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    Richard Nixon, such as he was, called psychologist Timothy Leary “the most dangerous man in America.” Other people felt the same – amid his legendary experimentation with psychoactive drugs, Leary would see time in 30 jails during the 1960s and '70s. Controversy also dealt a blow to his livelihood; he and fellow researcher Richard Alpert left their Harvard University teaching positions in 1963 (Alpert was let go for dispensing a drug; reports conflict as to whether Leary was fired or quit). Fade to 1996, the year Leary died, at age 75. Alpert would eulogize his friend as “my first profound spiritual teacher” – and he knew of what he spoke. Also known as culture figurehead Ram Dass, he got the latter name (Hindi for “servant of God”) during his travels to Nepal and India. He would write “Be Here Now,” the 1971 book on spirituality and meditation; in 2014, he was featured in the film “Dying to Know: Ram Dass and Timothy Leary,” which explores death, faith and the men's unique spiritual bond. You can see the movie, part of the 26th annual San Diego Jewish Film Festival, on Thursday, Feb. 11, at the David & Dorothea Garfield Theatre in La Jolla's Jewish Community Center; it will show again on the 14th at the Clairemont Reading 14. The Gay Dillingham-directed entry is particular to this event because Alpert, now 84, is Jewish – and it's only one of some 40 films that explore the concept of Judaism in popular thought. Other entries will be shown between Feb. 4 and 14 at La Jolla's ArcLight Cinemas and at venues in Carlsbad and San Marcos. The festival's PR material touts the event's “Jewish-themed” aspects, those that reflect Judaism as both a religious and cultural marker. Craig Prater, film festival director, called “Dying to Know” an ideal expression of each facet. Alpert's religion, for example, fueled his eventual embrace of Leary's tenets – on top of that, everybody in our culture knows those guys' names. “We have so many international film groups that may or may not be Jewish,” Prater said, “but they're interested in learning different cultures that make their film viewing experience broader. I believe that is what makes a Jewish film festival unique to other festivals. So many of our films refer to specific history down through the years, cultural things that may influence storylines. Same with Italian film. Some of them might emphasize food or something, but like Jewish film, the history is so much greater.” Indeed. The first mention of Judaism dates to two centuries before Jesus Christ, and history takes it from there. The faith and its cultural components have outlived some languages and countries amid dizzying evolutions in music, art, politics, war and religion. In “Dying to Know,” for example, Alpert explains that his strict Jewish upbringing led to his friendship with Leary and a larger view of the religious experience. “I came out of the Jewish faith,” he had said at Leary's eulogy, “and when I met Krishna, I was just flabbergasted that God would be singing and dancing and playing tricks on [Krishna's homies]. It just didn't compute.” On the other hand, he said, fate would eventually lead to his embrace of the faith. "My belief,” he told the Religious News Service in 1992, “is that I wasn't born into Judaism by accident, and so I needed to find ways to honor that. From a Hindu perspective, you are born as what you need to deal with, and if you just try and push it away, whatever it is, it's got you." If Alpert's story isn't exactly ripped from the headlines, Mideast conflict certainly is. The film “Rock in the Red Zone” is a case in point – it focuses on the Israeli town of Sderot, at once the birthplace of a revolution in Israeli rock music and a constant target of mortar fire from the Gaza Strip. “Younger audiences zero in on this one,” Prater said. “The rock stuff gets their attention, but there are so many scenes involving risk-taking in the areas where anything can happen at any time.” The town's many pleasant public art pieces, as well as its bus stops, double as bomb shelters – yet its musical spirit survives. So too does Judaism's place in the human experience. The world's 14 million Jews make up less than 0.2 percent of the global population, yet their mark on American society is as phenomenal as death, the core topic in “Dying to Know.” “We've moved (dying) from ICU wards to hospice and then maybe to something deep and profound,” Alpert says, “but [for Leary] to make it fun? What chutzpah!... [That's] a major statement for this society.” And amid his trials with society and faith, Alpert has an infallible take on the afterlife, born of a uniquely Jewish perspective. “If I had to choose between suffering and joy,” he asserts, “boy, I know where I'm going. I'm joy, joy all the way.” For a schedule of films and more on the festival, see sdcjc.org/sdjff/.
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    The dirt on public art in La Jolla
    Jan 19, 2016 | 15053 views | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    One recent autumn day, a young girl was found wordlessly gazing into the pond that abuts the La Jolla Community Center, at 6811 La Jolla Blvd. – several months' soot and mud had rendered her almost unrecognizable (left), and she rather curtly declined to field questions on everything from her age to her residence. Enter Barry Feinman, founder and CEO of Restoration ArTechs, a Carlsbad firm that recasts architectural and artistic surfaces like these; a couple phone calls and two hours later, the girl was another person, still mum on her background but well on her way to a new public persona. Feinman restored the statue Dec. 15 as an act of thanks for the community's support. The sculptor is the acclaimed Mary Buckman, who runs a studio in North Park. PHOTOS CONTRIBUTED
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    News
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    Feb 04, 2016 | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Sports
    La Jolla High basketball team plays into the stretch
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    Feb 03, 2016 | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Opinion
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    Feb 08, 2016 | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Arts & Entertainment
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    Business
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    Obituaries
    Charles S. (Chip) Cox, 93, Scripps ocean study pioneer
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