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    Trenton Fudge: 'The Vulture' enjoys the favor of the baseball gods
    by ED PIPER
    Apr 01, 2015 | 1477 views | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    La Jolla High School pitcher Trenton Fudge isn't even a starter, yet he has multiple wins this season. PHOTO BY ED PIPER
    La Jolla High School pitcher Trenton Fudge isn't even a starter, yet he has multiple wins this season. PHOTO BY ED PIPER
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    La Jolla High School pitcher Trenton Fudge is at the plate and hits a ball that drops untouched between two outfielders, who barely move toward the catchable ball. It figures. Fudge has been the recipient already this season of some good fortune and good luck. “When he plays, things happen,” bemusedly observes Steve Booth, assistant coach for the La Jolla baseball team. The fly ball in question came with runners on second and third, the Vikings down 3-1 to the visiting Birmingham (Van Nuys) Patriots. Fudge’s double drove in two runs, tying the Lions Tournament contest in the fifth inning. La Jolla went on to win 10-4 after the mental mistake opened the floodgates. Another lucky chance that fell the 17-year-old junior’s way came in the championship game of an earlier tournament, Bully’s East. He came in to relieve with the Vikings leading. He gave up a grand slam to the second batter he faced from Santa Fe Christian. He laughs, “I came in when we were leading, and then we fell behind.” Yet he picked up the victory when La Jolla rallied to come back and win the tournament title game. “The baseball gods have been smiling on him,” Jacob Grosz, the Vikings’ pitching coach, says. Booth guffawed at his player’s luck so far. “He has (multiple) wins, and he isn’t even a starter,” he says. Fudge chuckles at his fortune so far this season. He took last year off after playing baseball as a freshman, going out for the tennis team. “But I was convinced (to play baseball again),” he says, smiling. “I wanted to play with Ben (Wintringer),” a fellow junior who plays in the infield, like Fudge. He invokes the nickname “The Vulture” for the way he has fed off other hurlers’ efforts to get credit for wins through the first part of the 2015 campaign. He was 3-1 as a reliever through the team’s first 11 games, which is pretty remarkable. Against Birmingham in the Lions Tournament, he pitched only 1⅓ innings, facing seven batters, to snag the win. He didn’t seem aware of the original bearer of the “Vulture” moniker – right-hander Phil Regan of the Dodgers, who went 14-1 in relief in L.A.’s National League championship year of 1966. Sandy Koufax hung the nickname on Regan for swooping in to take away some of his wins in the last innings. Fudge, whose older brother Braden played baseball and sister Kailey played volleyball for the Vikings, makes it look easy. But it certainly doesn’t come without effort and ability. In his other sport, football, the swift wide receiver clipped the Santa Fe Christian Eagles’ wings in the CIF playoffs last fall with three touchdown catches – the third a fingertip catch just over the outstretched hands of his defender, who was checking him closely. “That was Collin (Rugg). He’s a great quarterback. He just placed it perfectly. But I did my part,” says the dual-sport student athlete. The underdog theme comes out as one converses with Fudge, who is taking U.S. history in class. He admires the way George Washington strategized and led a ragtag citizen militia in the Revolutionary War to defeat the army of Great Britain, the world’s superpower at the time. The wide receiver, who like his brother Braden is a kicker in football, is listed as 5’10”, 155 pounds in the Lions Baseball Tournament program. He’s going up against opponents much bigger than him. “Typically, our football team is an underdog,” he says. He lists La Jolla’s opponents last fall: Country Day, Bishop’s, Madison and Christian, all four of whom made it to CIF title games at the end of the season, with all but Madison triumphing. La Jolla swamped Country Day in the two teams’ season opener three months prior to that. Fudge’s parents are Jill Cutri and Robert Fudge, both of whom attend Trenton's games as much as possible. Fudge loves the beach as well as an In-N-Out order of a double-double, fries and a vanilla shake. He orders the California Burrito at Don Jose’s. Friends would describe him as outgoing and funny. “I like to joke around. I’m a happy guy. I like to be around people,” he responds when asked to describe himself. “We both (Braden and I) played soccer,” says Fudge in partial explanation of their success in kicking in football. “I feel he was a better kicker – a stronger leg. But we’ll see,” allowing for his senior season yet to come.
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    What's in a name? Find out at the 2015 Concours d'Elegance
    by MARTIN JONES WESTLIN
    Mar 30, 2015 | 6140 views | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    This 1927 Duesenberg, which won three awards at the 2014 La Jolla Concours d'Elegance, is a primary example of craftsmanship from the days of yore. COURTESY PHOTO
    This 1927 Duesenberg, which won three awards at the 2014 La Jolla Concours d'Elegance, is a primary example of craftsmanship from the days of yore. COURTESY PHOTO
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    Don't look now, but the nickname is no longer the province of the human experience. Automobiles have cut their way in line, and their handles are as endearing as their histories. “Caddie” is synonymous with “Cadillac”; “Beetle” is a popular descriptor for something other than the world's largest insect class; and in the right context, “Chevy” evokes thoughts of everything but a noted American comic. Then there's “doozy,” a vernacularism for the Duesenberg luxury auto that saw a pretty good 25-year run through 1937. Don't let the fancy-schmancy bow-tie front bumper fool ya – the model showed its mettle in the real world too, winning three Indie 500s and nearly morphing into a wartime aircraft. You can see similar bits of history April 10 to 12 at the 11th annual La Jolla Concours d'Elegance, set for Ellen Browning Scripps Park at La Jolla Cove and featuring coachbuilt classic cars from the 1930s and '40s – and rest assured that at least one past exhibitor knows of what he speaks, regarding the moniker “doozy” as the collateral phenomenon it is. “The [nickname] is an interesting thought and an area I've never even explored,” said Doug Skeen, who trotted out a 1927 Duesenberg that won three awards at La Jolla in 2014. “I tend to focus more specifically on the cars than the generalities.” “The cars” are all over the place this time of year, as cities from Paris to Pebble Beach trot out their automotive finery. La Jolla gets into the act for its legendary seaside locale and its place among the 60 or so American concours. La Jolla's was named one of the top three most anticipated car shows of the year by the prestigious British automotive magazine “Octane.” “It's fairly highly regarded in the collector car circle,” Skeen said. “La Jolla... has not been one of the top concours, but it looks like they're headed in the right direction. There's a little more organization each year, a little wider variety of cars. Some of the better cars are starting to come out.” Presumably, they feature a reflection on a time when quality was king. “The Duesenberg engine compartment looks like a jewel box,” Skeen said, “from a time when the builders and machinists cared about craftsmanship.” Indeed, the area under the hood takes on a life of its own – it's a different color than the rest of the car and presumably shone off the La Jolla sun last year, a testament to the picture-perfect weather that seems to greet this event each spring. Nobody can seem to remember a rainout, which would be a disaster amid such loftiness of fare. And loftiness of sticker. In 2013, the Pebble Beach concours peeps set a record with the $31.6 million sale of a Mercedes Benz racer; the following year, the concours collectively rang up $400 million in automotive sales. There's a river of money flowing through every concours ever year – but Skeen's nod to craftsmanship is an apt reminder to the thousands who will pack La Jolla Cove the weekend of April 10. For more on the event, see lajollaconcours.com or call (858) 233-5008.
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    Around the block: The art of business rules in a changing Upper Girard
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Mar 29, 2015 | 6161 views | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Upper Girard Avenue features Ferrari of San Diego, flanked by a number of up-and-coming businsses.
    Upper Girard Avenue features Ferrari of San Diego, flanked by a number of up-and-coming businsses.
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    Editor's note: This is the first in a series of pieces on a La Jolla whose current commercial face seems to change by the day. We're currently dividing the Village into several portions and will spotlight each in our hardcopy edition and online in the coming weeks. For the latest on Village life, please visit sdnews.com. Upper Girard in La Jolla, between Pearl and Genter streets, is changing its complexion. Whether you want to buy a Maserati, a sandwich, camera gear or a perm, work out, take an art class or music lessons or go on a Segway excursion, you can do it all on Upper Girard. “This block is totally a true artist’s block,” said Leon Chow of C&H Photo, which moved to 7442 Girard Ave. from Fay Avenue a couple years ago. “On the other side of the street is D.G. Wills book store, Harvard Cookin Girl and La Jolla Music. On our side is My Art Shed and us.” Tapenade French restaurant is remodeling a retail space on north Upper Girard to relocate to from its present site at 7612 Fay Ave. For Emily Latham and owner Porschia Talbot of My Art Shed at 7426 Girard, the gallery is ideally situated. “It’s a great spot because the schools (La Jolla Elementary and The Gillispie School) are so close,” said Latham, noting their stock in trade is teaching art classes and summer camps as well as hosting special events like birthday parties. “We’re also a functional gallery so people put up their work to sell as well.” The north side of Upper Girard is anchored on the corner by Maserati of San Diego at 7477 Girard, kitty-corner to San Diego Ferrari at 7514 Girard, with which it is aligned. “We’ve been here about three years now,” said Maserati sales associate Joseph Vadala. “We get customers from all over the country, especially people who don’t have Maserati dealers in their areas. “This is a great part of town to be in because of our clientele base, people with income who want some thing (vehicle) that’s a little extra, maybe something a little less com mon,” said Vadala. A couple doors down from Maserati is Pro Rituals Salon, at 7443 Girard, where hairstylists Terrence Michael Renk and Carrie Brown ply their trade. Renk previously was the hairdresser for daytime TV soap “All My Children.” “It’s a great place to be,” said Brown of the block. “Everyone here is really loyal. Once you make a relationship with people, they keep coming back. We’re getting lots of referrals.” Elizabeth Allen Atelier said her eponymous bedding business is departing soon after three years, noting “the block just doesn’t get a lot of foot traffic.” The Village Greens Healthy Food Kitchen recently opened at 7441 Girard, Suite A, co-owned by restaurateurs Nanci Kirk and April Richardson-Caulk. “Upper Girard is quickly morphing into what La Jolla was when I was a kid, which is less commercial and more unique,” said Richarson-Caulk. “About 40 percent of our business is takeouts, and I had no idea people would want home-cooked meals they can take home so much,” said Kirk. Jaw Wang, of La Jolla Music, at 7423 Girard, noted the business has been in La Jolla since 1962 and on Girard since the '70s. “We sell instruments like guitars,” said Wang, “but our main focus is lessons, which we offer with more than 30 teachers who use our rooms.” Wang added that local students in bands and orchestras are some of the store’s clientele. “We have a lot of schools around here,” Wang added, “so it’s very convenient for students to come in after school and take lessons.” There are more businesses than you think on the south side of Upper Girard, inhabiting all the little nooks and crannies in between all the deep retail spaces on the block. They include La Taverna at 7420 Girard, Armone’s Core Connection at 7438 Girard, Design Studio West — San Diego Kitchen and Bath at 7424 Girard, Lola La Jolla at 7444 Girard, Aly’s Pilates at 7448 Girard, Blush at 7450 Girard, Gracie and Company at 7458 Girard, The Faded Awning Coastal Interiors at 7464 Girard, Ogden’s One Hour Cleaners at 945 Pearl St., The La Jolla Segway Tour, The Futon Shop at 7470 Girard, Girard's Nail & Skin Care at 7454 Girard, Bellemani Salon at 7462 Girard, John’s Tailor Shop at 7466 Girard and Pannikin Coffee & Tea at 7667 Girard, to name a few. Chow noted the economy is improving, pointing out that “storefronts aren’t closing, they’re finding other spaces to land in.” He noted that, besides becoming increasingly diverse, Upper Girard also has significant parking in front and back of many businesses. Chow thinks Upper Girard has a bright future. “Everything needs to just evolve a little bit,” he said. “If we (merchants) all could just get through to the other side: Everybody here is worth it."
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    Back in time: Airport exhibit fetes Balboa Park centennial
    Mar 25, 2015 | 4609 views | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    The so-called 'electriquettes' shuttled people around Balboa Park's 1915 exposition. PHOTO FROM SAN DIEGO METRO
    The so-called 'electriquettes' shuttled people around Balboa Park's 1915 exposition. PHOTO FROM SAN DIEGO METRO
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    Officials at San Diego International Airport on March 24 unveiled a yearlong exhibition of public art that celebrates the centennial of Balboa Park. “Balboa Park & the City: Celebrating San Diego’s Panama-California Exposition” is the largest temporary art exhibit ever at Lindbergh Field, according to airport officials. “With 30 installations spread among all three terminals, the exhibition offers a truly immersive experience that takes you back in time,” said Thella Bowens, president and CEO of the San Diego County Regional Airport Authority. The exhibition includes original artwork and historic images, collectibles and artifacts from the 1915 Panama-California Exposition, which gave San Diego its first major international exposure. The display, which went up on March 23, includes historic photographs and large-format postcards that document the history, landscape and architecture of the park. Ten local artists donated original work that is representative of or inspired by Balboa Park and the city of San Diego. The exhibition’s images include historic photographs and postcards presented in large format documenting the unique history, landscape and architecture of the Park. The Art Program solicited original artwork that is representative of or inspired by Balboa Park and the city of San Diego from local artists. Ten participants were selected to exhibit their work based on their aesthetic and creative representation of the Park and unique use of media. Exhibition highlights include: • A replica of the famous wicker “Electriquette,” which transported fairgoers at the 1915 Exposition; • Lighting designs by Jim Gibson, inspired by the ornate fixtures at the 1935 Exposition; and • Original works by Guillermo Acevedo, a celebrated illustrator and documentarian of San Diego’s landmarks and historic sites. — City News Service, San Diego Metro
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    TIME, TALENT AND TREASURE
    Mar 24, 2015 | 2727 views | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Thanks to graphic artist David Roost, things are that much brighter in University City's Standley Park these days. Roost, who grew up in UC, painted this fancy design on the park's Fort Field Little League shed in a project underwritten by the University City Community Association. Roost also took the photo.
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    News
    Chargers should stay until payment of stadium bonds is met, Sherman says
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    Apr 01, 2015 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Sports
    UC lacrosse middie sees the humor in all that hard work
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    Mar 25, 2015 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Opinion
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    Mar 31, 2015 | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Arts & Entertainment
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    Apr 01, 2015 | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Business
    New La Jolla shop nails fresh clientele
    Inails & Spa, offering complete professional nail care, is now open for business in the Vons shopping center at 7523 Fay Ave., Suites C and D. The company is owned by Brian Nguyen and wife Nicky Le...
    Mar 25, 2015 | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Obituaries
    La Jolla Kiwanian John Talbot, 93
    John “Jack” Talbot, 93, a La Jolla Kiwanian of long standing who “recruited” numerous service club members over the years, died March 13 of pneumonia and congestive heart failure. Talbot was born i...
    Mar 25, 2015 | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend
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