test
Sdnews rss feed
    Safe and relaxed: USDA program not targeting jetty cats
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Feb 23, 2017 | 2266 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Jetty cat Tiggs relaxes on a rock as the sun sets. / PHOTO BY THOMAS MELVILLE
    Jetty cat Tiggs relaxes on a rock as the sun sets. / PHOTO BY THOMAS MELVILLE
    slideshow
    One of the jetty cats cleans up after a late afternoon meal. / PHOTO BY THOMAS MELVILLE
    One of the jetty cats cleans up after a late afternoon meal. / PHOTO BY THOMAS MELVILLE
    slideshow
    Rumors that Mission Beach’s jetty cats may become part of the annual United States Department of Agriculture predator cull to protect endangered birds in Mission Bay has residents riled, leading to a petition drive initiated on Forcechange.com to protect the feral felines. But the outrage about the predator program removing members of the well-known cat colony may be misguided. In December 2016, the City of San Diego posted a notice about the federal predator management program noting its purpose is to “protect the endangered California least terns and their nests from predatory animals at nesting sites through Mission Bay.” The notice said actions against potential predators – skunks, raccoons and opossums including feral cats – may include monitoring, trapping, dispersal and shooting. That statement led to the rumors that the jetty cats could be targeted by the USDA program. But according to a statement on the Jetty Cats - San Diego Facebook page: "We have received a lot of messages and posts regarding the issue with the USDA. They are not trapping near our colony and any cats trapped in other areas will be taken into animal control. “We have been working with several other groups regarding the safety of our cats and we have found that this is already an active project that the USDA has been doing for 10 years now. The sad news is any wildlife (predators to the protected birds) will be killed. The methods are not humane and this should not be tolerated in such a modern society. San Diego Humane Society is actively working to fight this.” The Jetty Cats - San Diego Facebook page is run by volunteers who control the jetty cats population by using the trap-neuter-return program. The dedicated volunteers also feed and look out for the health and safety of the jetty cats. The annual Mission Bay predator cull is conducted by USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Wildlife Services, which noted previously: “Our predator management activities are meant to boost the survival rate of these endangered birds and increase their population numbers.” “Our devices are adjusted to minimize non-target take, and if non-target animals are captured, they are released or taken to local shelters,” said a USDA spokesman. “We have captured five cats since 2014 while doing this type of work. All were unharmed and taken to local shelters. “Wildlife Services posts signs and issues warnings to alert pet owners when wildlife traps or other devices are being used in an area for wildlife damage management,” the spokesman said. “These devices are only set at the request of and with permission from property owners or managers.” A nonprofit dedicated to animal welfare providing adoption and veterinarian services, San Diego Humane Society acknowleged it opposes the USDA's predator management program. “Suggesting we trap and kill one group of wildlife to save another is contrary to the mission of San Diego’s oldest nonprofit, and not the answer,” said San Diego Humane Society spokesperson Kelli Schry. “For 136 years, SDHS has forged common ground in our community for working together on humane and effective solutions for companion and wild animals. No one denies that the problems caused by outdoor cats are real. “We believe that trap-neuter-return programs, matched with effective public education campaigns to reduce the number of owned cats outdoors, will produce measurable results in the years ahead. Studies have shown that TNR is the most successful method we have of controlling healthy feral cat colonies. And it’s the most humane,” Schry said. Noting San Diegans “have the power and responsibility to speak up for the voiceless,” Schry added, “TNR and the other humane strategies for outdoor cats and wildlife represent a forward-thinking approach that is in tune with both ecological sensibility and the practical realities of protecting our animals and preserving our ecosystem. We don’t need to war with animals so much as we need to work together to make sure our pets and wildlife are safe now and in the future.” Asked their views on the jetty cat issue by Beach & Bay Press on NextDoor.com, several Pacific Beach residents responded. “My point of view is based solely on my opposition to the notion of culling anything … cruel and avoidable,” said Sara Jouin-Nah of PB. “Killing any animal, especially a cat, is never a 'good idea,' ” said Art Morris of PB. “Now, for the previous owners of abandoned cats … don't get me started.” “These poor cats need a chance to go to a good home rather than ending their lives because of humans who don't care for them,” said Susan Srouse of Pacific Beach. “Please help these feral cats.” Addressed to San Diego Mayor Kevin Faulconer, a preamble to the Forcechange.com petition to save the jetty cats reads: “A proposed roundup in the Mission Bay area of San Diego could result in the barbaric killing of stray cats by nearly any means deemed appropriate, including the shooting of cats ... The intended proposal will involve the placement of traps throughout the Mission Bay area, and could threaten a well-maintained and beloved feral cat colony ... The laying out of traps to capture these semi-tame cats, only to have them euthanized or possibly shot offsite, is cruel and unnecessary.” The jetty cat petition in its entirety is at forcechange.com/164591/stop-the-brutal-killing-of-feral-cats. Want to help? Each volunteer pays for food on their own. If you would like to make a donation, contact hpjettycats1@gmail.com. All donations will go for the cost of care for cats.
    Comments
    (0)
    Comments-icon Post a Comment
    No Comments Yet
    La Jolla news and community briefs
    Feb 09, 2017 | 37754 views | 0 0 comments | 21 21 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    A few sea lions catch some rays on Feb. 6 at the tide pools south of the Children's Pool. PHOTO BY BLAKE BUNCH
    A few sea lions catch some rays on Feb. 6 at the tide pools south of the Children's Pool. PHOTO BY BLAKE BUNCH
    slideshow
    'Freaky Friday' opens, runs until March 12 The La Jolla Playhouse production of Freaky Friday officially opens February 3 following previews that began Jan.31 in San Diego. Starring as the mother and daughter who swap bodies for a day are Heidi Blickenstaff and Emma Hunton, respectively, reprising their roles from the world-premiere staging last fall. Playhouse artistic director Christopher Ashley, who directed Blickenstaff and Hunton in the debut staging at the Signature Theatre in Virginia, returns to direct at La Jolla. The engagement is scheduled to run through March 12 in the Mandell Weiss Theatre. The University of California San Diego's 'SlowSD' SlowSd is a 72-hour free festival of slow music and art that will begin at midnight on Friday, Feb.10, 2017 and last through Sunday, February 12. Presented by Assistant Professor Erik Carlson, SlowSD will feature performances of modern and historic works by current professors, graduate students, and special guests. Please review the festival schedule for information on performance timing and locations. Admission to each festival event is free. The Athenaeum Music & Arts Library announces 'A Night at the Library' The Athenaeum is proud to present a literary and musical journey featuring guitarist Colin McAllister. Drawing inspiration from Alberto Manguel’s "The Library at Night (a series of essays on the idea of the library)," Colin McAllister’s captivating new recital takes the listener on a literary, musical and historical journey through time and place. For several of Manguel’s essays (e.g., “The Library as Imagination”, “The Library as Space”, “The Library as Oblivion”) McAllister interweaves music alongside readings from the book, historical vignettes and visual imagery in an engaging concert-length presentation. The compelling selection of music includes masters of medieval, Renaissance, and Baroque polyphony, the first “Golden Age” of the guitar, sensual rhythms from Latin America, and a newly commissioned work, Spines, by award-winning composer Christopher Adler. La Jolla Presbyterian to host blood drive In partnership with the San Diego Blood Bank, the San Diego Blood Bank will accept blood donations at La Jolla Presbyterian Church on Sunday, Feb. 12 from  8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.  The drive will be held at:  7715 Draper Ave San Diego, 92037 Life Center Building Room 3  About 1 in 7 people entering a hospital need blood. One pint of blood, which is the amount volunteers give when they donate blood, can save up to three lives. Approximately, 38% of the U.S. population is eligible to donate blood but less than 10% do annually. Since blood is always needed, volunteers are asked to give blood for patients, such as those going through cancer or trauma.  Donors must meet the following eligibility requirements: - 17 and older (Age 16 requires a parental consent) - 114 pounds and in good health It is recommended that donors consume an adequate meal and plenty of fluids prior to giving. A photo identification must be presented upon signing up to donate. Donors are encouraged to schedule an appointment for their convenience but walk-ins are also welcome. To schedule an appointment, please call 619-469-7322 or visit www.SanDiegoBloodBank.org. Local authors publish their love story for Valentine's Day Local authors Elwin Wallace Law and Dr. Liselotte Mettler address the issue of dual professional relationships with the release of their memoir, Lovers to Spouses. Published by Branden Books, the dual memoir shares the intimate details of a complex relationship between two intrepid young professionals, who fall in love with life as well as each other, begin ambitious careers, then separate, only to reunite 40 years later. Elwin Wallace Law, an expert in finance and investment, conquers the California real estate market in the 1970s; Dr. Liselotte Mettler competes in the 1960 Olympics in Rome, then helps invent minimally invasive surgery. When they finally come back together, they shape their relationship in a way that serves both families as well as each other. “We have a unique relationship that works,” says Law, “one that will not be limited by traditional social rules. We live both together and apart, but always reunite with commitment and plenty of love—this way we can maintain both professional and family relationships.” The book will inspire readers to reevaluate both the quality and the design of their own relationships. The publication falls in the “biographies & memoir” genre of non-fictional works. It tells the story of a woman learning to survive the constant inequity in the workplace. It tells the story of a man who grapples with the ethics of his employer, only to reinvent his career even stronger. As they mature, they marry, have children, and find themselves both single again—only to find one another again after more than 40 years. As Dr. Paul Wetter, chairman of the Society of Laparoendoscopic Surgeons explains in the Foreword of Lovers to Spouses, “This book is about the great gift of a good life.” UCSD Sports UCSDis coming off a 37-21 overall season and finished fourth in the CCAA with a 23-15 record. The Tritons won the CCAA Tournament with a 3-0 swept and earned an automatic bid to the NCAA West Regionals, where they fell to Central Washington in the second elimination game. Head coach Patti Gerckens, going into her her 25th season, welcomes back three all-conference players, and two All-West Region honorees, including the CCAA Freshman of the Year, Maddy Lewis. Lewis, a first team all-conference and second team all-region selection, will return for her sophomore year as an infielder for the Tritons. The Alameda product finished sixth in the CCAA in batting average (.367), with 47 hits, 33 RBI, and 16 stolen bases. She also led the conference in sacrifice flies (5) and played in 49 games. First team All-CCAA and second team All-Region honoree, Kelsi Maday, will enter her junior year after starting all 58 games in the outfield last season. In 2016, Maday set a single-season school record with 37 stolen bases and tied a single-season Triton record with 54 runs. The Napa product also finished with a .368 batting average, 40 RBI and 64 hits. Junior Lauren Sanders also returns after finishing the season as an All-CCAA second team selection. Sanders finished the season with 37 RBI and 17 stolen bases. The Tritons lost Lexi Edwards, a three-time All-CCAA pitcher. Edwards capped her senior season after starting 26 games, with a 1.96 ERA, 16-9 record, and 80 strikeouts. She also paced the CCAA in saves with eight. UCSD also lost key players in Taylor Abeyta (52 hits, 18 RBI, 17 stolen bases) and Emma Schneider (29 hits, 11 doubles, 13 runs, 21 RBI). Triton Notes Since 2006, UCSD is 8-3 in season openers and 7-4 in home openers. Last season, the Tritons opened 9-1, including 8-0 at home. Hannah Brown is the returning leader in the pitching staff in wins (12), innings pitched (105.2) and strikeouts (56). Milana Casillas returns as the leader in ERA (1.74) and opposing batting average (.292). Kelsi Maday was UCSD’s best hitter last season, topping the roster in batting average (.368), runs (54), doubles (12), RBI (40), slugging percentage (.552) and home runs (6). Maday was also the top base stealer in 2016, swiping 37 bags. In the field, Lauren Sanders posted a team-high 237 putouts in 2015.Maddy Lewis will be the returning leader in assists after totaling 109 last season and triples (4). Rachel Phillips returns after posting the highest fielding percentage (.992) in 2016. Maday sits on the individual career top-ten in several categories including batting average (.345), home runs (10) and steals (52). Lewis currently sits sixth on the career all-time list with a .356 batting average. The Tritons welcome seven newcomers to the 2017 squad. UCSD has 16 California natives on its roster, with Kendall Baker (Berthoud, Colo.) and freshman Alanna Phillips (Utica, N.Y.) being the only players out of state. The Tritons have two local products on the roster: Mikaila Reyes (San Diego/Torrey Pines HS) and Lauren Brown (San Diego/Academy of Our Lady of Peace). Kalaba, Mitchell, Silva added to coaching staff UCSD has added Carissa Kalaba, Carly Mitchell and Liz Silva as the newest members of its coaching staff. Kalaba has 10 years of head coaching experiencing and was most recently the head coach at Utah State from 2009-13 where she coached one All-American and seven all-conference players. Prior to Utah State, Kalaba was the head coach at Biola University from 2004 to 2009, where she compiled a 143-94 record as the all-time winningest coach in program history. She played softball collegiately at UCLA, helping the team win the 1999 NCAA World Series Championship and Pac-10 titles as well as served as an undergraduate assistant coach for the Bruins in 2000. Mitchell played softball for CSU Dominguez Hills from 2014 to 15, after transferring from San Diego Mesa Junior College, where she played from 2011 to 13. At San Diego Mesa, she helped her team win the PCAC Conference Championship in 2012 and 2013. Silva arrives in La Jolla after spending two years as the assistant coach (2015) and head coach (2016) of the varsity softball team at Hilltop High School in Chula Vista. She guided her team to two Metro-Pacific League titles and a semifinal berth in the CIF Division III Championship. She played softball collegiately for Oklahoma State, primarily as a catcher and second baseman for the Cowgirls. She was an All-Big XII selection and a member of the 1998 Oklahoma State team that finished third in the Women’s College World Series. Head coach Patti Gerckens Patti Gerckens is currently in her twenty-fifth season in charge of the UC San Diego softball program in 2017. Gerckens has amassed an overall record of 655-545 (.546) over her 24-year career, with eight straight 30-win seasons among 11 total including 2016’s 37-wins. The Tritons have gone 511-381 (.573) in 16 years since Gerckens guided the team’s transition from Division III to Division II in 2001, including 307-224 (.578) as a member of the ultra-competitive California Collegiate Athletic Association (CCAA), widely considered the best Division II conference in the country. The winningest coach in program history, Gerckens led the Tritons to four straight NCAA postseason berths from 2011-14, beginning with back-to-back school-record 45-win seasons and appearances in the Division II championship game, the first of which brought UCSD its first softball title in 2011. The Tritons finished as national runners-up in her milestone 20th campaign in 2012. Gerckens has led UCSD softball to 11 NCAA postseason appearances, with nine at the Division II level. UCSD is 22-18 (.55) in the NCAA Division II Championship. Since taking over the team in 1993, 30 of Gerckens’ players have combined for 55-All West Region selections. Forty-five of her players have earned All-CCAA honors since 2001. She has also coached four All-Americans. Three of her players have earned CCAA Freshman of the Year honors and two Tritons have won CCAA Player or Pitcher of the year during her tenure. A native of Old Tappan, NJ, Gerckens graduated from the University of North Carolina in 1989 with a bachelor’s degree in health and physical education. She was a four-year starter at second base for the Tar Heels and also played for the New Jersey Blue Jays of the Amateur Softball Association for nine years, winning a championship in 1992.
    Comments
    (0)
    Comments-icon Post a Comment
    No Comments Yet
    Thousands protest refugee ban at San Diego Airport
    Jan 30, 2017 | 34816 views | 0 0 comments | 31 31 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    After President Trump signed an executive order on Jan. 27 banning refugees from entering the country for 120 days and immigrants from seven predominantly Muslim nations – Iran, Iraq, Syria, Sudan, Libya, Yemen and Somalia – for three months, protests erupted at airports across the U.S. In San Diego, nearly 2,000 protesters were at Terminal 2 on Jan. 29 condemning the ban and supporting refugees and immigrants. / PHOTO BY NOUSHIN NOURIZADEH
    Comments
    (0)
    Comments-icon Post a Comment
    No Comments Yet
    Scripps alumnae's Rigs-to-Reefs program looks to sustain sea life
    by BRITTANY HOOK
    Jan 26, 2017 | 24139 views | 1 1 comments | 34 34 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Amber Jackson and Emily Callahan aim to protect these man-made reefs. PHOTO BY KYLE  MCBURNIE.
    Amber Jackson and Emily Callahan aim to protect these man-made reefs. PHOTO BY KYLE MCBURNIE.
    slideshow
    Scripps alumnae Amber Jackson and Emily Callahan. / Photo by Theresa Stafford / Black Hand Gallery
    Scripps alumnae Amber Jackson and Emily Callahan. / Photo by Theresa Stafford / Black Hand Gallery
    slideshow
    The California coast is lined with 27 offshore oil and gas rigs that can be seen jutting out across the horizon—a reminder of humans’ dependence on fossil fuels. Below the surface, however, these platforms are home to some of the most dynamic ecosystems in the world, harboring everything from mussels and scallops to garibaldi and rockfish. As many of these enormous rigs are approaching the end of their viable production lives, scientists, environmental agencies, and oil companies are left begging the question: should the rigs stay or should they go? Emily Callahan and Amber Jackson, two alumnae of Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego, have made it their mission to dive below the surface of these oil and gas platforms to determine the best possible “afterlife” scenario for these complex structures. The two women met in 2013 while taking a scientific diving course at Scripps Oceanography, where both were pursuing Master of Advanced Studies degrees in Marine Biodiversity and Conservation. A conversation soon emerged about Rigs-to-Reefs, which is the name of a state law and associated program that essentially converts decommissioned oil and gas rigs into artificial reefs. “What you’re focusing on with Rigs-to-Reefs is everything below the surface, like the tip of the iceberg. That’s where all the life is,” said Callahan, a marine biologist and PADI certified divemaster with expertise in environmental consulting. When she first came to Scripps, Callahan had only recently learned about the success of the Rigs-to-Reefs program in the Gulf of Mexico, where 500-600 decommissioned oil platforms now serve as artificial reefs and provide abundant fishing opportunities, world-class diving, and recreational activities, and an ecological hotbed of underwater activity. She was stunned to learn that none of California’s rigs had been approved for a similar Rigs-to-Reefs conversion. Callahan shared her interest in the program with Jackson, who was equally enthralled. “We really made it our mission in grad school and we’re still working on it—to combine science with powerful imagery and a meaningful message to change the tide of public perception around this program,” said Jackson, a fiery-haired oceanographer with a passion for science communication. “It’s been the cornerstone of what we do and it fuels our exploration and educational initiatives.” Inspired by the possibilities of Rigs-to-Reefs implementation in California, Callahan and Jackson focused their joint thesis on the topic. Their innovative research led them up and down the coast of California where they dove numerous platforms, conducted ROV surveys, studied the biodiversity of marine life on and around the structures, and analyzed the legislation surrounding Rigs-to-Reefs. They also documented their findings through video, photography, and social media—engaging visual mediums that have enabled them to show the public the beauty and importance of these thriving underwater regions. Rigs-to-Reefs is a controversial law and program in which an oil company chooses to modify a platform so it can continue to support the valuable and fragile ecosystems that have formed on and around the structures. The decommissioning process still holds platform operators responsible for removing drilling infrastructure and capping and sealing the well—and they remain permanently liable for any damages coming from the well—but the upper portion of the rig (at least 85 feet for ship clearance) is cut and towed to an alternate location or the structure is toppled on its side. Some environmental groups oppose the Rigs-to-Reefs program because it transfers liability of the structure from the oil companies to the state or the Department of Fish and Wildlife, which then manage it as an artificial reef. The program also saves the oil companies money, upwards of millions of dollars, but any savings are split 50/50 between the company’s stakeholders and the state, which is required to use that money for marine conservation and education—a silver lining according to Callahan and Jackson. The women also argue that the removal and disposal of such enormous structures—some as tall as the Empire State Building—is costly and comes with a massive carbon footprint. California doesn’t have the infrastructure on land to recycle these structures, so the only viable option for complete removal is to cut the structures down, load them onto gigantic barges, and tow them to Southeast Asia where they can then be broken down and recycled. According to Jackson, the bunker fuel used by barges outside of state waters “makes gasoline look like champagne.” After examining the Rigs-to-Reefs program from all angles, Callahan and Jackson determined that it would be a beneficial program for the state of California, providing an ecologically and environmentally friendly alternative to complete rig removal.   “The future of conservation is that you’re going to have to work with the government, you have to work with oil companies, you have to work with the ‘bad guys’ if you want to change what they’re doing and make a positive impact on the environment,” said Jackson. “Emily and I are not pro-oil and gas development; we’re working on decommissioning the end life stage of these platforms. But I just love the challenge of trying to communicate that there is an ecological, economic, and social benefit to repurposing these structures as reefs—not only in California but around the world.” Upon graduation from Scripps in 2014, Callahan and Jackson decided to continue working together and co-founded Blue Latitudes, an organization that uses scientific research to form a comprehensive study of the ecological, socio-economic, and advocacy issues surrounding California's Rigs-to-Reefs law and program. Blue Latitudes provides neutral and scientifically based consulting services to various clients, including gas and oil companies and environmental groups, to assess structures and determine whether they are good candidates for Rigs-to-Reefs. Blue Latitudes also operates as a non-profit organization through a fiscal partnership with Mission Blue, a global initiative to protect the world’s oceans led by famed oceanographer Sylvia Earle. This wing of the company allows Callahan and Jackson to focus on education and outreach, and the two are currently forging relationships with teachers and schools across San Diego and Los Angeles and developing unique classroom curriculum about marine science for middle and high school students. The duo continues to spread the word about their research through speaking engagements at aquariums, libraries, classrooms, and more. And they are digitally savvy—constantly updating their social media accounts with stunning images from their latest diving adventures and information about their latest projects. They also educate audiences through a YouTube channel called ScienceSea TV, through their website, and as guest bloggers on National Geographic. The women credit their Scripps education with providing them the expertise needed to succeed as scientists, explorers, and entrepreneurs. “Scripps has really given us the right tools to be successful with our business, so that’s been really exciting,” said Callahan, noting that she frequently emails former advisors and Scripps researchers Peter Franks and Jules Jaffe, among others, with questions. “We have such great resources at Scripps to talk to about everything from imaging these platforms, to understanding the biodiversity, to running the ROVs. I’m really grateful to have that support.” “One thing I think we really took away from our master’s program at Scripps and at the Center for Marine Biodiversity and Conservation was not only understanding the science, but also understanding how to communicate it effectively,” said Jackson. “Amber and Emily embody a sense of bold environmental activism that seeks to find solutions to environmental problems that are mutually beneficial to industrial goals and those of the environmentalists,” said Jaffe, who served as co-chair on Callahan and Jackson’s thesis advisory panel. “The Rigs-to-Reefs program’s goal is to save industry money, while at the same time having them share the savings with environmental groups. It’s a win-win for the two factions, but an even bigger win for the organisms that have made these underwater offshore oil platforms their homes, as they will, hopefully maintain the deeper parts of these structures.” The future looks bright for the ladies of Blue Latitudes, and they already have plans to expand their expertise to international waters. They have an expedition planned in March 2017 to Malaysia, where they will explore and assess the country’s platforms. Their long-term goals include researching the oil and gas platforms in Southeast Asia and Australia, all the while following their overarching goal of thinking creatively about the resources that we have and how to preserve the ecosystems thriving quietly below the surface. “Our general message of Blue Latitudes is to dig a little deeper,” said Callahan. “Rigs-to-Reefs is definitely not 'save the whales.' It’s not as easy. It’s not as digestible. But if you dig a little deeper, there’s a lot of really interesting science there, and a lot of interesting pathways to go down.”
    Comments
    (1)
    Comments-icon Post a Comment
    Michael Bear
    |
    January 28, 2017
    California's oil rigs provide a rich variety of marine life to enjoy and study. Some of my most memorable dives have been on the Long Beach oil rigs. Nice work by Ms. Callahan and Jackson--I fully support Rigs-to-Reefs as an on-going sustainable artificial reef program that will yield many scientific treasures for years to come.

    Michael Bear

    Citizen Science Project Director

    Ocean Sanctuaries

    San Diego, CA
    SeaWorld San Diego transitions to 'Orca Encounter'
    Jan 18, 2017 | 43602 views | 1 1 comments | 166 166 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    SeaWorld's new 'Orca Encounter' will focus more on how these predators exist in the wild. Photo provided by SeaWorld.
    SeaWorld's new 'Orca Encounter' will focus more on how these predators exist in the wild. Photo provided by SeaWorld.
    slideshow
    As announced in March 2016, SeaWorld is transitioning from theatrical orca shows to a more educational presentation reflecting more natural behaviors of the whales. The first of these “live documentary”-style presentations, called Orca Encounter, will debut at SeaWorld San Diego this summer. SeaWorld Orlando and SeaWorld San Antonio will follow by 2019. The final "One Ocean Shamu" show was conducted at SeaWorld San Diego on Sunday, Jan. 8. Their interim educational orca presentation called a “Killer Whale Presentation” started on Monday, Jan. 9. They have set up temporary seating (bleachers) around the orca underwater viewing area pool and will provide our guests this educational presentation while the new Orca Encounter backdrop is constructed at the main pool. Guests to SeaWorld San Diego will continue to experience live orca presentations, as they make preparations for the new education-based Orca Encounter to debut this summer. Guests will learn how killer whales behave in the wild, how they move, hunt and navigate, what they eat and even how they communicate. "Orca Encounter" will not only help guests gain a deeper appreciation and respect for the orcas, but will leave them with a new sense of determination and purpose to help preserve the future of these majestic animals. This new presentation will also look at broader themes such as research, rescue, conservation, habitats and distribution, husbandry and care, and social structures.  This will inspire as well as educate guests about the majesty of these complex animals and reinforce the company’s commitment to provide educational experiences with the park’s resident Orcas. 
    Comments
    (1)
    Comments-icon Post a Comment
    Kate-Lyn Jones
    |
    January 18, 2017
    I found a video on YouTube called "Tilikum Died - SeaWorld Executives EXPOSED: The Killing of Tilikum Blackfish Killer Whale Dies " made by Bright Insight.

    It shows that Joel Many, who came from the general motors Saturn and Saab divisions, has a base pay of $1million, but because SeaWorld is a publicly traded company, made 11.3 MILLION DOLLARS last year!

    And it's not just him, Jack Roddy the chief of human resources who came from Starbucks, Peter J. Crage the chief financial officer from Extended Stay America (a hotel chain), Anthony Esparza the Chief Creative Officer who came from a design firm and other entertainment parks, are all MILLIONAIRES! All of the corporate executives, who left Tilikum to die in that tank, make the decisions in SeaWorld and all of their other parks! Their not marine biologists, they never were, what they are focused on is making money. So who would you rather believe? Experts who have spent most of their lives studying wild Orcas from birth to death, or just a bunch of people that want to solely make money from animal abuse and probably know next to NOTHING about these animals?

    Please share Bright Insights video, more people need to know about this. He might also do a video on Lolita and Seaquarium soon.
    News
    Albion Pros gear up for Division 2; open with Phoenix Rising
    San Diego’s only professional outdoor soccer team, Albion Pros, won a 3-2 thriller over East Bay Stompers with a last-minute goal by Pros forward David Luquen on Feb. 11 at Mission Bay High. The te...
    Published - Wednesday, February 22
    full story
    LA Jolla music calendar
    Friday, Feb. 24 Ben Benavente, singer-songwriter, Noon. UTC Palm Plaza Ben Benavente, singer-songwriter, 4 p.m. Duke’s Angie Keilhauer, singer-songwriter. 5 p.m. Farmer & The Seahorse Jeffrey Dean,...
    Published - Wednesday, February 22
    full story
    Mobile barber shop goes with the flow for beach cuts
    Being a surfing devotee helped Lawrence Mendez jump into the driver’s seat and launch his unique barbershop on wheels – Coastal Flow Barber Shop. Lured by a personal need to be by the beach, Mendez...
    Published - Tuesday, February 21
    full story
    Photo exhibit examines Jewish life throughout the world
    The Gotthelf Art Gallery, part of the San Diego Center for Jewish Cultures, located at the Lawrence Family Jewish Community Center, is proud to announce its new installation, “Eye Connect: Our Glob...
    Published - Monday, February 20
    full story
    San Diego Humane Society offers free spay and neuter services on Feb. 28
    On Feb. 28, San Diego Humane Society will perform 80 free spay/neuter surgeries and give away 75 free spay and neuter appointments to qualifying pet owners in celebration of World Spay Day. Income-...
    Published - Monday, February 20
    full story
    Bloodmobile taking donations on Sports Arena Blvd. Feb. 21
    The San Diego Blood Bank will accept blood donations at Phil's BBQ, 3750 Sports Arena Blvd., on Tuesday, Feb. 21, from 11:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. About one in seven people entering a hospital need blood....
    Published - Monday, February 20
    full story
    Two Mission Beach men plead guilty to deliberately sinking boat
    Two Mission Beach businessmen have pleaded guilty to conspiracy to sink a 57-foot boat used for charter sport-fishing trips in order to collect insurance money. Christopher Alan Switzer, 39, of La ...
    Published - Monday, February 20
    full story
    Enter the Blue Sky to play the Ocean Beach Farmers Market
    San Diego has many wonderful places to hear live music, but there’s nothing like the Ocean Beach Farmers Market. Located at the intersection of Newport and Bacon avenues, a block from the beach, pe...
    Published - Sunday, February 19
    full story
    Johnston receives 'Service to Sports' award
    Pacific Beach resident, David (DJ) Johnston, a mathematics teacher at Bishop’s since 1993 and assistant coach of girls’ varsity volleyball and girls’ varsity soccer, was selected by the High School...
    Published - Friday, February 17
    full story
    The Wine Pub to hold overnight excursion to Valle de Guadalupe
    To prolong the enchanting experience of Baja’s wine country, The Wine Pub announces its first all-inclusive, overnight excursion across the border starting on Saturday, Feb. 25. The lavish trip pro...
    Published - Friday, February 17
    full story
    Funds available for affordable housing projects in San Diego
    The City of San Diego has announced the availability of $25 million to fund affordable housing projects. This Notice of Funding Availability (NOFA) released by Civic San Diego (CivicSD) will allow ...
    Published - Friday, February 17
    full story
    Free sandbags available from San Diego County
    Rains, possibly heavy at times, are heading back to San Diego County in the coming days, according to weather officials. Which means that if you haven’t done it already, it’s a good time to stock u...
    Published - Thursday, February 16
    full story
    Letter to the editor: Move pinnipeds from developed beaches
    Mr. Covington offered a choice. I choose the first proposal - move the seals. The seals and sea lions are inhabiting developed beaches that have cost the taxpayers of San Diego millions of dollars…...
    Published - Thursday, February 16
    full story
    Mission Bay Montessori Principal kisses one-eyed chicken
    At 8:15 a.m. on Feb. 15, Mission Bay Montessori Academy principal, Kristie Miller, puckered up at the school’s flag ceremony to do the deed she promised, to kiss a one-eyed chicken. As a motivation...
    Published - Thursday, February 16
    full story
    Current Issues(Archives)
    The Peninsula Beacon, February 16th, 2017
    download The Peninsula Beacon, February 16th, 2017
    The Peninsula Beacon, February 16th, 2017
    La Jolla Village News, February 10th, 2017
    download La Jolla Village News, February 10th, 2017
    La Jolla Village News, February 10th, 2017
    Beach & Bay Press, February 9th, 2017
    download Beach & Bay Press, February 9th, 2017
    Beach & Bay Press, February 9th, 2017
    The Peninsula Beacon, February 2nd, 2017
    download The Peninsula Beacon, February 2nd, 2017
    The Peninsula Beacon, February 2nd, 2017