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    OH! San Diego architecture and design event offers free tours of area’s iconic buildings
    Mar 22, 2019 | 350 views | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    The monumentality of world-renowned architect Louis Kahn’s vision of The Salk Institute is particularly felt in the open courtyard of travertine marble, bisected by a ribbon of water which leads your eye to the ocean beyond. In 1992, the Salk received a 25-Year Award from the American Institute of Architects (AIA) and was featured in the AIA exhibit Structures of Our Time: 31 Buildings That Changed Modern Life. The Salk Institute has been described by many as the single most significant architectural site in San Diego.
    The monumentality of world-renowned architect Louis Kahn’s vision of The Salk Institute is particularly felt in the open courtyard of travertine marble, bisected by a ribbon of water which leads your eye to the ocean beyond. In 1992, the Salk received a 25-Year Award from the American Institute of Architects (AIA) and was featured in the AIA exhibit Structures of Our Time: 31 Buildings That Changed Modern Life. The Salk Institute has been described by many as the single most significant architectural site in San Diego.
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    The San Diego Architectural Foundation (SDAF) has announced its popular OH! San Diego architecture and urban design event will take place March 23-24. This festival of free tours at an impressive 100 locations citywide offers the public a rare, behind-the-scenes look at some of San Diego’s most iconic buildings. Visitors will have the chance to discover some of the newest, never-before-seen buildings, in addition to historic landmarks throughout downtown, Bankers Hill, Barrio Logan, Balboa Park, Point Loma (see below), and, new this year, La Jolla (see below). There will be designer-led tours and talks at many sites. There will be a juried architectural photography competition, with prizes awarded in a variety of categories. Attendees will start their weekend by signing in at a neighborhood hub where they will receive a free souvenir map and passport, which will be stamped at each site they visit. Each OH! San Diego site features its own unique story: innovative use of materials, repurposing of space, environmental sustainability, energy efficiency, or unique use of public areas. Spaces such as architecture and design studios, museums, schools, hotels, high-rises, and SDAF Orchid Award winners, as well as historically designated sites are featured. “Absolutely everyone is welcome to attend,” said Susanne Friestedt, founder of OH! San Diego. “We expect thousands of San Diegans and out of town visitors, including families and architecture and design students interested in learning about the design, history and development of our city. Last year, more than 7,500 visits were tallied at 83 sites. This year we anticipate at least 10,000 site visit visits. 350 trained volunteers will be on hand to assist visitors.” Todd Gloria, Assemblymember of San Diego’s 78th District and honorary chair of OH! San Diego 2019, said: “High quality planning, design, and architecture enrich our lives as well, as the physical beauty of San Diego, and are hallmarks of a great city. OH! San Diego is an opportunity to explore outstanding examples of architecture and design in our community.” This year’s highlights: • Cutting-edge sustainable buildings: Block D Makers Quarter, features net-zero energy and integrated environmentally responsive technology. The J. Craig Venter Institute sets the standard for sustainable scientific research facilities world-wide. • Innovative mixed-use buildings: These feature high-density living, bold design and roof tops with amazing views. Visit Shift, IDEA1, Park 12 and Broadstone Makers Quarter, all in East Village. Get a sneak peek at K1 on a “Hard Hat Tour” before it opens this summer. • Affordable housing developments: Atmosphere and PATH Connections offer critical support services for their residents, many formerly homeless. • Architecture and design studios: These sites offer visitors one-on-one interactions with leading design professionals. Domusstudio architecture has transformed an eyesore into its beautiful Orchid Award-winning design space. • Kids activities: Opportunities for kids and parents include collaborating with architects to sketch their own versions of architecture at Liberty Station and Wisteria Cottage. • Behind-the-scenes: Opportunities include an insider’s perspective of San Diego’s iconic performance venues, including Spreckels Organ Pavilion, Jacobs Music Center and the historic Spreckels Theatre. Most sites will be open from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. with open access. Some will offer scheduled talks and guided tours on a first-come, first-serve basis, while others will require reservations. Most sites are family friendly and easily accessible by public transit, bike or trolley. A full list of participating sites is available at nsdarchitecture.org/openhouse. POINT LOMA Situated on a peninsula with breathtaking views of San Diego Bay and the Pacific Ocean, Point Loma reflects many rich and deep histories: a close-knit Portuguese community; Juan Rodriguez Cabrillo’s famous 1542 landing site; America’s Cup Harbor and yacht clubs; Marine Corps Recruit Depot, the former Naval Training Center, now Liberty Station; Fort Rosecrans; the Naval Base; and the world-famous Cabrillo National Monument. _____________________________________________________________________________________ 71 ALL SOULS’ EPISCOPAL CHURCH 1475 Catalina Boulevard Robert Mosher, 1969 The sanctuary is a wonderful example of mid-century modern church architecture. Its hexagonal plan, sweeping protective roof, magnificent pipe organ, and finely crafted wood interior celebrates worship, community, art, and a kinship with nature. An exquisite stained glass window by renowned artist James Hubbell illuminates the space with magical, spiritual light. The church is currently embarking on a re-imagining of the campus to better serve the community. ___________________________ SAT 10AM – 4PM / SUN 1PM – 4PM / Self–guided tour / Architect-led tour SAT at 11AM & 12:30PM _____________________________________________________________________________________ 72 POINT LOMA HERVEY BRANCH LIBRARY | OH! SAN DIEGO HUB 3701 Voltaire Street Conwell Shonkwiler & Associates, 2003 The library’s design follows a nautical theme, with its faux ship’s hull, wave-like roof form and a periscope that allows patrons to view the surrounding community from within the building. At night, up-lighting makes it glow, creating a beacon for the neighborhood reminiscent of the region’s most notable landmark, the Point Loma Lighthouse. ___________________________ SAT 10AM – 4PM / SUN 10AM – 4PM / Self–guided tour / Architect-led tour SAT every 30 min from 10AM – 2PM Kids Activity: Point Loma High School Robotics Team Demonstration SAT 10AM – 2PM _____________________________________________________________________________________ 73 JENNINGS HOUSE CAFE 1018 Rosecrans Street Unknown, 1886 The Jennings House was built by Sheriff Frank Jennings and his wife, Inez. The home is thought to have at one time included a single-cell jail for the small Point Loma Community – not a far trek for Sheriff Jennings! The simple frame house has been maintained as a local gathering place and coffeehouse for over 20 years. The architecture is complemented by period photography throughout, capturing Point Loma in the late 1800s and early 1900s. Crown molding, glass doorknobs and vintage furnishings add the finishing touches. ___________________________ SAT & SUN 10AM – 4PM / Self–guided tour _____________________________________________________________________________________ 74 POINT LOMA NAZARENE UNIVERSITY 3900 Lomaland Drive Multiple Architects Before serving as the Point Loma Nazarene University campus, this site was the location of a Theosophical commune run by Katherine Tingley, known as ‘Lomaland’. The campus on a bluff overlooking the Pacific Ocean is one of the Top 20 Most Beautiful College Campuses in the U.S. Its mix of architectural styles include historic buildings from the Theosophical era, the first Greek Theater in the U.S., mid-century classics by campus architect Richard Lareau and innovative, energy efficient, modern masterpieces. Visit the campus and explore the buildings below among many others.   MIERAS HALL 1901 One of the most striking buildings remaining from the Theosophical Society era, it was once home to Albert G. Spalding, the sporting goods tycoon. The central octagonal-shaped room has a dome crowned with a six foot tall amethyst-colored glass bulb and decorative carved wooden elements throughout. The exterior features a covered porch and unique spiral staircase.     LYLE AND GRACE PRESCOTT MEMORIAL PRAYER CHAPEL Carrier Johnson + CULTURE and Tecture, 2018 Simple lines and pure forms embody the true essence of a chapel’s purpose—a spiritual anchor for the campus. The entry plays with scale, compressing and then opening up to enhance the progression from exterior to interior. The tall and narrow interior volume of the sanctuary is expressed in textured concrete, wood and glass. Overhead, a light filigree of native wood hangs in the space, filtering natural daylight and evoking Christ’s crown of thorns. The number three, symbolic of the Holy Trinity, is evoked throughout the design, such as in the three prayer niches that radiate from the main space.   LATTER HALL & SATOR HALL Carrier Johnson + CULTURE, 2015 The 32,900-square-foot Science Center has iconic curved stainless-steel screens, laser cut with Alpha and Omega symbols. Ethereal sunlight floods into the building which contains teaching labs and lecture rooms. A rooftop terrace provides expansive views of the Pacific Ocean.   ___________________________ SAT  10AM – 2PM / Self-guided tour / Check in at TBA Guided tour at 10:30AM, 11:30AM & 12:30PM / Meet at Latter Hall & Sator Hall _____________________________________________________________________________________ 75 PORTUGUESE HISTORICAL CENTER 2831 Avenida de Portugal In 1977, the late Basilio Freitas and others founded this historic center to preserve the culture, heritage, language and folklore of the Portuguese community for future generations. The Center hosts a collection of genealogical information, photos and artifacts from the community’s rich history, and archives the many accomplishments of Portuguese leaders and organizations, both locally and worldwide. Members also maintain the Tunaman’s Memorial on Shelter Island. ___________________________ SAT 10AM – 4PM / Self–guided tour _____________________________________________________________________________________ 76 ST. AGNES CATHOLIC CHURCH 1140 Evergreen Street The history of this church is tied to the Portuguese immigrants who first settled here in 1883 to work in the fishing industry. The church was originally built by men of the parish in 1908. In 1933, the crews from 15 boats each pledged 25 cents per ton of fish to build a new church, a Mediterranean-style structure with a bell tower containing an illuminated statue of Our Lady of Good Voyage, who guided the fishermen back to the bay. The church is adorned with beautiful stained glass windows imported from Ireland and many life size statues from Italy. ___________________________ SAT 10AM – 1PM / Self–guided tour _____________________________________________________________________________________ 77 ARTS DISTRICT LIBERTY STATION | OH! SAN DIEGO HUB 2640 Historic Decatur Road San Diego’s largest Arts & Cultural District is located in the historic buildings of the former Naval Training Center, where from 1923 to 1997, nearly two million young men—and eventually women—were trained. The Art’s District’s restored 45 buildings are home to nearly 145 tenants including museums, galleries, artist studios, dance companies and non-profit organizations that showcase San Diego’s creative community. The principal influence on the design of the original structures was architect Bertram G. Goodhue, who designed many buildings for the military, in addition to his work in Balboa Park for the 1915 exposition. Goodhue created a simplified Spanish Colonial Revival style with Pueblo influences that was very plain and unadorned and which was realized throughout NTC by the Navy Public Works Office. Buildings included in the guided tour include those listed below, among others. BUILDING 175 / DOROTHEA LAUB DANCE PLACE 2650 Truxtun Road Navy Public Works, 1941 This former Navy School building, where recruits learned how to make torpedoes, is now home to three of San Diego’s leading professional dance companies and schools.     BUILDING 200 / DICK LAUB NTC COMMAND CENTER 2640 Historic Decatur Road Navy Public Works, 1942 This distinctive building with a pointed cupola above the vestibule lobby, is set back from the street within gardens and palm groves. The former mahogany paneled Commanders’ offices are now community meeting rooms. The hallways are lined with historic exhibits and art from current Art’s District artists.     BUILDING 35 / THE LUCE AUDITORIUM / THE LOT 2620 Truxtun Road Navy Public Works, 1941  Navy recruits saw training films here and enjoyed the latest Hollywood offerings, along with Point Loma residents. Bob Hope and other celebrities did radio broadcasts from its stage. It is fitting that the historic Art Deco building has been rehabilitated to serve as a modern cinema, complete with a new glass-enclosed cafe/ bar. ___________________________ SAT & SUN 10AM – 4PM / Self–guided tour / Start at Dick Laub NTC Command Center Guided walking tours SAT at 1PM / Reservation required _____________________________________________________________________________________ 78 STONE BREWING WORLD BISTRO & GARDENS 2816 Historic Decatur Road David Robinson Design, 2013 This former mess hall has been re-purposed as a brewery and restaurant, but hasn’t forgotten its roots. The main dining hall retains the original architecture with its tall, exposed wood ceilings and introduces an industrial and organic mix of metal, stone, concrete, and reclaimed wood. At over 20,000 square feet, the space features multiple dining areas and a 10-barrel brewery. Outside, the equally expansive garden space includes water and fire features. ___________________________ SAT & SUN 10AM – 4PM / Self–guided tour ____________________________________________________________________________________ 79 SIM BRUCE AND JANET RICHARDS RESIDENCE III 955 Bangor Street Sim Bruce Richards, 1957 Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright apprentice, Sim Bruce Richards, for his family, this home is sited on a steep hillside. The mid-century architecture features a palette of natural materials, a flowing floorplan, unique siting, and one-of-a-kind fireplace designs. Purchased from the Richards family in 2017, the home now showcases the new owners’ vast collection of post-war pieces by San Diego artists and craftsmen, such as John Baldessari, Margaret Loring, John Dirks, James Hubbell and Jackson Woolley. ___________________________ SAT & SUN 1PM – 4PM / Self–guided tour / Owner available to answer questions _____________________________________________________________________________________ 80 THE MILLER HULL PARTNERSHIP 4980 North Harbor Drive Miller Hull Partnership, 2009 In October 2018, Miller Hull moved its architecture studio into this vibrant waterfront complex that they had previously designed. The firm has a strong commitment to ecological design and, like their Seattle studio, this space was designed with the intent to become certified with the Living Building Challenge, which asks the question – “What if every single act of design and construction made the world a better place?” The net-zero energy studio is aided by a rooftop PV array and retrofitted with operable windows to take advantage of the cool marine air and reduce energy loads. The interior is finished with healthy, sustainable materials and is filled with daylight and beautiful views of the harbor. ___________________________ SAT 10AM – 4PM / Self–guided tour / Guided tour every 30 min _______________________________________________________________________________ 81 ULLMAN SAILS 2805 Canon Street, 2nd Floor In 1967, 21-year-old competitive sailor, David Ullman, founded the company with a single sewing machine, making sails for Lido 14 and Sabot class boats. Over fifty years later, the San Diego “Loft,” as full-service sail maker locations are called, is one of 77 Ullman lofts located world-wide. The company provides sails for Olympian sailors and world-class teams for many Cup races and National Championships. The large, open space was remodeled in 2007, adding sewing pits to the Loft, allowing use of the floor as a table to facilitate working with larger sails. ___________________________ SAT & SUN 10AM – 4PM / Self–guided tour / Access via stairs only _______________________________________________________________________________ 82 BALI HAI 2230 Shelter Island Drive Raymond Frazer, 1953 / Graham Downes, 2010 There has been a tiki bar in this location on Shelter Island since 1953. When Tom Ham, now a well-known San Diego restauranteur, took over a year later, he rechristened it Bali Hai, after the mythical forbidden isle from the book, which became the 1949 musical, South Pacific. The Bali Hai has maintained its iconic tiki style, which is complemented by new design features added under the direction of the late, renowned San Diego architect, Graham Downes. The original woodwork – 15 types of rare, exotic wood – was restored to its original natural beauty. A sculptural wood façade, outdoor dining deck and free-standing event pavilion with breathtaking bay views, were added. To accommodate boaters, the dock was retrofitted, making it the largest ‘Dock & Dine’ dock on the Bay. The Ham family continues to operate the Bali Hai, still one of the region’s most famous tiki ‘temples’. Look for the iconic “Goof on the Roof” and “Mr. Bali Hai” sculptures. ___________________________ SAT 10AM – 1PM / Self–guided tour / Guided tour at 10AM & 11:30AM _______________________________________________________________________________ 83 POINT LOMA ASSEMBLY 3035 Talbot Street John B. Stannard, 1915 Founded in 1911, this bungalow-style community center has served many purposes – civic meetings, art exhibits, social functions—and was a Red Cross Distribution Center during World War I and II. Today, it remains a vibrant gathering place, hosting meetings, plays, weddings, and church services. A vintage car, period outfits, historic photos and music of its original era will be on display. ___________________________ SAT 10AM – 4PM / Self–guided tour _____________________________________________________________________________________ 84 UPSES CHAPEL 2818 Avenida de Portugal Built 1922 The style of chapels on the island of Terceira, Azores, is replicated in this almost century-old chapel. The interior follows the tradition of small chapels that devout fishermen constructed in their tuna vessels from the 1920’s. Today, the Chapel is used to house the Crown of the Holy Spirit during the Festa do Espirito Santo celebrations. On Pentecost Sunday, devotees of the Holy Spirit visit the Chapel to pray and offer a donation of money, or Portuguese sweetbread to assure the continuation of this time-honored ethnic religious celebration. ___________________________ SAT 10AM – 1PM / Self–guided tour _______________________________________________________________________________ 85 ARMADA TERRACE RESIDENCE 736 Armada Terrace Lloyd Ruocco, 1950 / DNA Design Group, 2018 Honoring the original architect’s vision of minimalism, contemporary design and wood and glass construction, this reimagined 1950’s-era home seamlessly flows from indoors to outdoors. Features include a floor-to-ceiling sliding door system, a more functional open floorplan, eco-friendly materials, an infinity pool, and an abundance of low-irrigation landscape and smart-home technology. ___________________________ SAT & SUN 1PM – 4PM / Self–guided tour LA JOLLA Founded in 1887 and home to Ellen Browning Scripps, who built her house on the ocean side of Prospect Street, “The Jewel” has become an educational and cultural epicenter anchored by Scripps Institution of Oceanography, the La Valencia Hotel, La Jolla Playhouse, University of California San Diego, the Salk Institute, and Birch Aquarium. Visitors come from around the world to visit sea lions at Children’s Pool, stroll Prospect street’s shops and restaurants, hike Torrey Pines State Beach, explore tidepools and sea caves, and swim, surf and sunbathe at iconic beaches. _____________________________________________________________________________________ 86 ATHENAEUM MUSIC & ARTS LIBRARY 1008 Wall Street William Templeton Johnson, 1921 / William Lumpkins, 1957 / David Singer, 2006 The Spanish Revival-style building is home to this non-profit membership library, dedicated to the study of music and art. It is one of only seventeen such libraries in the country. The site is comprised of three historic buildings, joined together to create a cohesive space. It features stylized arched windows and classical columns at the front portico and an iconic rotunda, which houses the music room. Eminent La Jollan and philanthropist, Ellen Browning Scripps, was the first president of the organization, which was founded in 1899. As the oldest cultural institution in La Jolla and one of the oldest in San Diego, the Athenaeum today is a vibrant cultural center, presenting exhibits, concerts, lectures and art classes. ___________________________ SAT & SUN 10AM – 4PM / Self–guided tour / Guided tour every 30 min _____________________________________________________________________________________ 87 GRANDE COLONIAL HOTEL  910 Prospect Street Richard Requa, 1913 / Thomas L. Shepherd, 1925 / Frank Stevenson, 1928 The Colonial Apartments and Hotel, as it was originally known, is La Jolla’s oldest hotel. The main four story, concrete hotel, boasting the first fire sprinkler system west of the Mississippi, was built in 1928. During construction, the original wood-framed structure on the site by architect Richard Requa, was moved to the rear of the property where it still operates as part of the hotel. Putnam’s La Jolla Drugstore and Soda Fountain was located there for many years and was managed by actor Gregory Peck’s father. Today, the property includes two designated historic landmarks – The Little Hotel by the Sea, by architect Thomas Shepherd, and the Garden Terraces. ___________________________ SAT & SUN 10AM – 4PM / Guided tour every 30 min / Reservation required / SATURDAY TOURS / SUNDAY TOURS _____________________________________________________________________________________ 87 DAN MCKINNEY YMCA  8355 Cliffridge Avenue Built, 1967 / Golba Architecture, 2018 Dan McKinney, a longtime La Jolla resident, and the facility’s namesake, generously donated to the expansion of the 50+ year-old YMCA. 25,000 square feet was added and the property now includes two new swimming pools, a splash pad for water play, a three-story “adventure center” play structure and studio for children, a community space with cafe, and an outdoor fitness area. ___________________________ SAT & SUN 10AM – 4PM / Self–guided tour / Guided tour every 30 min _____________________________________________________________________________________ 88 IS ARCHITECTURE | OH! SAN DIEGO HUB 5645 La Jolla Boulevard Built, 1951 Formerly a retail storefront, this building now houses IS Architecture, an award-winning firm specializing in historic restoration and custom residential architecture. The two side-by-side storefronts provide employees with a shared open plan space for collaboration and more private areas to retreat to for focused work. The firm’s passion for historic preservation can be seen in the carefully-crafted design of the office, featuring an eclectic mix of contemporary and historic fixtures, such as a Danish modern light and repurposed doors from Egypt. ___________________________ SAT & SUN 10AM – 4PM / Self–guided tour  _____________________________________________________________________________________ 90 J. CRAIG VENTER INSTITUTE 4120 Capricorn Lane ZGF Architects, 2013 J. Craig Venter Institute (JCVI), is a leader in genomic research, with a commitment to environmental stewardship. The architecture of this 44,000 SF, three-story laboratory and research facility, is a direct response to the client’s challenge that a building should generate more energy than it consumes. The LEED Platinum-certified building contains some of the most innovative water conservation and energy-efficient systems available and serves as a model for sustainable research buildings worldwide. It also houses the offices of at least one Nobel Prize winner. ___________________________ SAT 10AM – 3PM / Guided tour every hour / Reservation required / 16 and over only / Park in garage and enter via doors in garage _____________________________________________________________________________________ 91 LA JOLLA HISTORICAL SOCIETY | OH! SAN DIEGO HUB 780 Prospect Street Built 1904 / Irving J. Gill, 1909 / IS Architecture, 2013 Housed in Wisteria Cottage, a fine example of vernacular architecture of early La Jolla, the Society serves as a popular resource and gathering place where residents and visitors explore history, art, ideas, and culture. Over the years, the simple structure has served as a guest house, a school and a bookstore, with additions by Master Architect, Irving Gill. The surrounding garden terraces with cobblestone walls feature the newly installed Venturi Pergola and Garden. The interior of the former house has been adaptively reused for exhibition space. It will feature Tangible Memories: Recollections of La Jolla Pioneer Women, a show about the life and history of early 20th-century women, artistically interpreted by female contemporary artists. ___________________________ SAT & SUN 10AM – 4PM / Self–guided tour  _____________________________________________________________________________________ 92 LA JOLLA RECREATION CENTER 615 Prospect Street Irving J. Gill, 1915 Originally called the La Jolla Playground and Community House and dedicated to the children of San Diego, it was commissioned by noted philanthropist Ellen Browning Scripps. The tilt-up concrete construction creating Gill’s signature arched arcade, was considered innovative for its time and became a hallmark feature of his work. A bench dedicated in 1926 to Miss Scripps, with a bas relief of children playing and an inscription by Robert Louis Stevenson, is the work of artist J.T. Porter, who also created a bronze statue of a child nearby. ___________________________ SAT & SUN 10AM – 1PM / Self–guided tour _____________________________________________________________________________________ 93 LA JOLLA WOMAN’S CLUB 7791 Draper Avenue Irving J. Gill, 1914 Like the La Jolla Recreation Center, the Woman’s Club was commissioned by Miss Scripps and employed Gill’s innovative tilt-up concrete construction. This prominently sited building with its clean lines and white plaster walls is enhanced by the series of pergolas, porches, courtyards and gardens that surround it. Gill’s trademark arches sit side-by-side with the simple, classic columns of the pergola and cast interesting shadows on the simple building mass. The spaces inside and out, evoke tranquility and purpose. In 2017, the club won the coveted Legacy Award from the San Diego Chapter of the AIA, who called the LJWC “the jewel in the crown of Irving Gill’s work.” ___________________________ SAT & SUN 10AM – 1PM / Guided tour every 30 min (last tour at 12:30) _____________________________________________________________________________________ 94 LA VALENCIA HOTEL AND SPA 1132 Prospect Street Reginald Johnson, 1926 For over nine decades, La Jolla’s Pink Lady has elegantly graced the seaside bluffs in the heart of the Village. The architect conceived a Mediterranean palace of pink stucco and terracotta tile, overlooking lush, terraced gardens and the sea beyond. Exquisite details are throughout the property, including mosaic fountains, Spanish tiled steps, hand-painted ceilings, and elaborate ironwork. Over the years, this storied hotel has served as a hideaway for Hollywood luminaries, from Chaplin to Pickford to Garbo. Irving Gill’s adjacent Hotel Cabrillo was integrated as the west wing of the hotel in 1956. ___________________________ SAT & SUN 10AM – 4PM / Self–guided tour _____________________________________________________________________________________ 95 LUCE ET STUDIO ARCHITECTS 5070 Santa Fe Street, Suite A Practicing at the intersection of architecture, art, and design, the studio’s work spans multiple scales from regional masterplans to custom furniture. By continuously exploring and seeking a solution that is specific to the problem, the studio’s custom design, thoughtful use of materials and attention to the smallest of details is evident in their workplace. Learn more about current projects such as the transformation of Mingei International Museum, Extraordinary Desserts at the Louie, and a private residence in Manhattan. ___________________________ SAT & SUN 1PM – 4PM / Self–guided tour / Guided tour every 30 min _____________________________________________________________________________________ 96 QUINT GALLERY 5171 Santa Fe Street, Suite H This industrial gallery space has presented over 250 exhibitions during its 37 years of business. The gallery consists of 7 spaces exhibiting contemporary art by emerging, mid-career, and established artists. Past exhibitions by well-known artists Kelsey Brookes, Gisela Colon, Robert Irwin, Ryan McGinness and many more have raised the bar for contemporary art in San Diego. When Mark Quint took over this space in 2016, he completely rebuilt the interiors and transformed the spaces to accommodate his vision for the gallery. ___________________________ SAT & SUN 10AM – 4PM / Self–guided tour _____________________________________________________________________________________ 97 REBA | LA JOLLA REAL ESTATE BROKERS ASSOCIATION 908 Kline Street Henry Hester, 1964 Designed specifically as a meeting space for the La Jolla Real Estate Brokers Association (REBA), the architecture’s mid-century modern lines are enhanced by the textural quality of the stacked masonry walls and the glamour of the book-matched polished marble slabs on the front façade. Wide planes of glass oriented to the entry courtyard, allow for the integration of indoor and outdoor spaces, while protecting them from the street. ___________________________ SAT & SUN 10AM – 4PM / Self–guided tour _____________________________________________________________________________________ 98 SHEPHERD FIREHOUSE YMCA 7877 Herschel Avenue Harold Abrams, 1936 / Trip Bennett III, 2015 Fire Station Engine Company 13 began life as much more than a fire station. Simultaneously, it also housed La Jolla’s first city hall, a police station, a hospital room, and the water department until 1976. The City of San Diego Historical Landmark was designed in the Spanish-Mission Revival style for the Works Progress Administration. The building remained unused for about a decade until the YMCA leased it from the City in the 1980s. The most recent renovation restored the firehouse’s exterior and added modern metallic finishes that contrast with the historical building’s façade. ___________________________ SAT & SUN 10AM – 4PM / Guided tour every 30 min _____________________________________________________________________________________ 99 ST. JAMES BY-THE-SEA EPISCOPAL CHURCH 743 Prospect Street Louis J. Gill, 1929 / Restoration, 2014 Like other important structures in La Jolla, this church has a strong connection to the Browning Scripps family. Eliza Virginia Scripps was instrumental in the founding of a church on this site in 1909. In 1928, Ellen Browning Scripps laid the cornerstone of the bell tower in memory of her beloved half-sister, Eliza Virginia. She selected the nephew of established architect Irving Gill to design the structure. He drew his inspiration for the iconic tower from the Campo Florida church in Mexico City. Today, the richly decorated Chimes Tower houses a working set of tubular bells and a newly renovated art gallery. The interior features a rugged wood beam ceiling. ___________________________ SAT 10AM – 4PM & SUN 11:15AM – 4PM / Self–guided tour / Guided tour every 30 min / Enter via front doors of church _____________________________________________________________________________________ 100 THE SALK INSTITUTE 10010 North Torrey Pines Road Louis I. Kahn, 1965 The Salk Institute was established in 1960 by Jonas Salk, MD, developer of the first safe and effective polio vaccine. Salk envisioned spacious, unobstructed laboratory spaces that could be adapted to the ever-changing needs of science, with building materials that were simple, strong, durable, and as maintenance-free as possible. The result: two mirror-image six-story structures, constructed of concrete, teak, lead, glass and steel, flanking a grand courtyard. Three floors house laboratories with the level directly above each of them providing free access to their systems and utilities. Towers jutting into the courtyard house study spaces for senior faculty. The monumentality of world-renowned architect Louis Kahn’s vision is particularly felt in the open courtyard of travertine marble, bisected by a ribbon of water which leads your eye to the ocean beyond. In 1992, the Salk received a 25-Year Award from the American Institute of Architects (AIA) and was featured in the AIA exhibit Structures of Our Time: 31 Buildings That Changed Modern Life. The Salk Institute has been described by many as the single most significant architectural site in San Diego. ___________________________ SAT & SUN 10AM – 1PM / Self–guided tour with docent stations / Access to plaza level only / Reservation required / SATURDAY TOURS / SUNDAY TOURS _____________________________________________________________________________________ a101 WARWICK’S 7812 Girard Avenue Built 1918 Established in 1896, Warwick’s is the oldest family-owned and operated bookstore in the United States. Known for its highly curated selection of books, including architecture and design books, eclectic gifts and jewelry, as well as fine stationery and office supplies, Warwick’s has the vibe of a community marketplace. Over the years, the events program has grown tremendously and the store is a popular place for authors to speak. Enjoy a game of chess on the giant chess board in front of the store. ___________________________ SAT & SUN 10AM – 4PM / Self–guided tour 
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    Tragedy at Torrey Pines Gliderport as two paragliders die in collision
    by EMILY BLACKWOOD
    Mar 22, 2019 | 60 views | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    A paraglider floats above Blacks Beach in Torrey Pines. / THOMAS MELVILLE / VILLAGE NEWS
    A paraglider floats above Blacks Beach in Torrey Pines. / THOMAS MELVILLE / VILLAGE NEWS
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    By all accounts, it was a pretty perfect day. The air was good, and there was plenty of space to fly, according to Torrey Pines Gliderport flight director Gabriel Jebb. No one could have imagined that it would be the backdrop for the Gliderport’s first death in more than 10 years, and its first midair collision to cause multiple deaths. It was a tragedy. One that, according to Jebb, "couldn’t have happened to two better guys.” On March 9, Glenn Johnny Peter Bengtsson, 43, of Carlsbad, and Raul Gonzalez Valerio, 61, of Laguna Hills, died after they crashed into each other and fell into a cliff. Both Bengtsson and Valerio were certified pilots who were well aware of rules regarding the distance to keep between each other. Valerio had fallen in love with paragliding after he retired and learned a couple of his buddies were doing it. He finished up his training at Torrey Pines a year ago, where he met Jebb.  “He had this incredible dynamic personality,” Jebb said. “The first day you met him, you liked him.” Valerio was known for being friends with everyone and could be found at Gliderport flying or even just hanging out with the pilots at least four days a week.  Bengtsson worked as a commercial pilot and was passionate about “aviation in any form.” Jebb met him back in January.  “His feeling was that once you started paragliding, flying a jet is like flying a car with more rules,” Jebb said. “Paragliding is about as close to being a bird as you can be." The San Diego Police, the San Diego Fire-Rescue Department, and the Medical Examiner's Office are still investigating. what exactly caused the collision, Jebb said the deaths of their good friends has not only been a tragedy but a wake-up call. Jebb said that as pilots, they try to learn from accidents like this one so that they can do their best to prevent it from happening again. In this case, he wants to encourage paragliders to really develop their situational awareness on things like fluctuation in the wind and how close they are to terrain and other pilots.  “There are inherent risks to the sport, but it’s no more dangerous than driving a car. But it can become incredibly dangerous when you stop paying attention. And unfortunately, I think that’s what happened.” Still, it is a relatively safe sport. According to ABC 10 News San Diego, the paragliding fatality rate is one in 100,000; the same statistic as automobile fatalities in the United States.  It was also reported that the staff at Torrey Pines Gliderport might host a memorial fly-in for Bengtsson and Valerio, but that date has not been set.
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    La Jolla businesses offer fun ideas for a daycation
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Mar 17, 2019 | 20221 views | 0 0 comments | 9 9 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Owned by Robert Mackey and Kai Koehnke, La Jolla Golf Carts started out as a promotion of their sister company, La Jolla Social, to help folks get around town. But it was such a good and workable idea, that the golf carts quickly became a hit on their own.
    Owned by Robert Mackey and Kai Koehnke, La Jolla Golf Carts started out as a promotion of their sister company, La Jolla Social, to help folks get around town. But it was such a good and workable idea, that the golf carts quickly became a hit on their own.
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    A handful of 2 1/2-hour tours at Fly Rides highlight the beauty – and history – of La Jolla.
    A handful of 2 1/2-hour tours at Fly Rides highlight the beauty – and history – of La Jolla.
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    Ever heard of a staycation? In La Jolla they have one better. It’s being referred to as a “daycation.”  And it’s something available from merchants offering tours, like San Diego Fly Rides, La Jolla Golf Carts and Pedego Electric Bikes. Max Shenk, operations manager of San Diego Fly Rides at 7444 Girard Ave., said locals and tourists alike take advantage of bicycling tours they offer daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. “When we first started out it was mostly tourist-driven,” said Shenk of Fly Rides. “But now we have a lot of locals who go themselves, or who have guests in town who want to do the tour.” Fly Rides started out small in an art studio space on Prospect, before spreading its wings and moving to Girard Avenue across from the Pannikin. The new space is filled to the rafters with pedal-assisted e-bikes of every imaginable type, both rentals and for sale. The retail space also has a full-service shop for repairs in the back. Fly Rides accommodates everyone from serious cyclists, to families to people just looking for a leisure day of exercise.  A handful of 2 1/2-hour tours at Fly Rides highlight the beauty – and history – of La Jolla. Torrey Pines Bike & Hike escorts guests through UC San Diego. Two of the most popular tours, costing $99 and $79, respectively, are SoCal Riviera and Cali Dreaming. SoCal Riviera is a loop of coastal La Jolla with a climb up Mount Soledad. Cali Dreaming is a downscaled version omitting the climb. On a recent weekend tour, native La Jollan Peter Hulburt of Fly Rides escorted Lyn Mettler, a visiting travel writer from Indiana, on the SoCal Riviera. Starting at La Jolla Cove, Hurlbert and guest took in the scenery, seals, sea lions and exquisite ocean views. The group stopped periodically for Hulbert to narrate a history of each area and its famous residents, like Ellen Browning Scripps.  At the Cove, the bike guide pointed out gnarled, leaning trees there that inspired famed children’s author Theodore “Dr. Seuss” Geisel’s work and art. Then it was south through Scripps Park to Windansea Beach, with Hulburt pointing out the high-profile surf breaks along the way. The SoCal Riviera Tour takes its name from the multimillion-dollar homes along the way in the downtown Village, at Windansea and on Mount Soledad. The tour wound through the popular La Jolla bike path between Bird Rock and La Jolla High School, with a stop to admire a huge cactus plant of the agave family from which tequila is made.  Returning to Girard, it was hard to believe 2 1/2 hours had elapsed. A similar, yet different, “daycation” experience is to be had at La Jolla Golf Carts at 7512 La Jolla Blvd. near the corner of Pearl Street.  Owned by Robert Mackey and Kai Koehnke, La Jolla Golf Carts started out as a promotion of their sister company, La Jolla Social, to help folks get around town. But it was such a good and workable idea, that the golf carts quickly became a hit on their own. “It started out with, ‘You need a ride here?,’” said Mackey, “Then it became, ‘It would be cool to drive it yourself.’ We basically turned it into a rental car company.” “We call it a self-guided tour,” said Mackey of La Jolla Golf Carts, which rents vehicles by the day, week or month. “It’s a great way to cruise around and enjoy beautiful La Jolla,” said Mackey. “We ended up helping a lot of people solve a transportation problem around the Village.” Mackey noted golf carts are especially handy for the aged, infirm or injured. Patrons at La Jolla Golf Carts have to be at least 21 years old. Families are not only welcome but are a centerpiece of the business, which offers four- and six-passenger carts for rentals, with plenty of kid space. Four-passenger carts rent for $169 a day, $189 a day for a six-passenger cart. “Our carts are street legal and have upgraded safety features,” pointed out Mackey noting carts have a 20 mph speed limit. La Jolla Golf Carts is open seven days a week, 365 days a year from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Go a bit south to Bird Rock, where Pedego Electric Bikes La Jolla has made a name for itself indulging biker’s need to proceed. “Most of our tours are custom and range from friends and family tours to corporate ‘team-building’ tours,” said Pedego spokesperson Tracy Sheffer. Pedego tours include: La Jolla Coastal/Mount Soledad National Monument Lunch Tour; Lookout Tour along the La Jolla Coastline to the La Jolla Cove, La Jolla Shores optional; Couples “Champaign Toast” Romantic Tour along the La Jolla Coastline to the La Jolla Cove; Electric Bike and Hike Torrey Pines State Park; La Jolla Shores Coastal Excursion to the Torrey Pines Glider Port and/or State Park; Southern Coastal Ride to the Historic Crystal Pier in Pacific Beach; La Jolla Shores Tour to the Birch Aquarium; and Customize Your Own Tour with the La Jolla Pedego team.  Pedego electric bikes have 250- to 500-watt motors capable of cruising distances up to 60 miles on a single battery charge. Pedego’s high-quality, innovative “pedal or not” models include cruisers, tandems, commuters, fat-tire bikes, mountain bikes, cargo bikes, a trike and a convenient electric folding bike.  Info Box:  San Diego Fly Rides 7444 Girard Ave. 888-821-6827 sandiegoflyrides.com La Jolla Golf Tours 7512 La Jolla Blvd. 858-401-6307 lajollagolfcarts.com Pedego Electric Bikes La Jolla 5702 La Jolla Blvd., Ste. 101a 858-291-8845 pedegoelectricbikes.com
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    Senior Gleaners gather surplus food in San Diego to help feed the hungry
    by LUCIA VITI
    Mar 15, 2019 | 36863 views | 0 0 comments | 12 12 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    A crew of Senior Gleaners working the coast including the Cayetano pick in Mission Beach. / Photo by Daryush Bastani
    A crew of Senior Gleaners working the coast including the Cayetano pick in Mission Beach. / Photo by Daryush Bastani
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    Calling all active seniors in need of productivity and vegetable farmers and homeowners with backyards filled with fruit trees. San Diego’s Senior Gleaners are ready, super excited and able to glean surplus produce in an effort to feed the hungry. Celebrating 25 years as a nonprofit organization, this dedicated group of volunteers collects food that would otherwise be wasted. Members glean surplus produce from farms, fields, groves, and backyards. The group also collects damaged or outdated foods and products donated by grocers, food services, and even restaurants throughout San Diego County. Picking occurs almost every Tuesday morning, year-round. Grocery crews are scheduled four mornings a week to grocery stores the include Windmill Farms, Vons, Ralphs, Keils, even Outback Steakhouse. Crew sizes and detailed surplus varies. The coastal communities of La Jolla, Pacific Beach, Ocean Beach and Point Loma are abundant with produce. “With all of the negativity in today's world, gleaning, a tradition established by landowners who set aside portions of their harvested bounty to feed the poor, is positive and productive,” said Monte Turner, Senior Gleaner board president. “We help to feed the hungry, reduce waste and keep retirees active.” According to Turner, the Senior Gleaners collected more than 280,000 pounds of produce and distributed nearly 252 tons of food in 2018. And yet, San Diego continues to waste 500,000 tons of food annually while 500, 000 people live in poverty or are considered food insecure. “While not starving, many San Diegans don’t know where their next meal is coming from,” he said. “We don’t have a hunger problem, we have a food distribution problem. Rather than compost edible food or fill landfills with what becomes harmful methane gas, it makes more sense to support groups like ours who get food to the people who need it.” Turner spoke of the emotional satisfaction that he gets from gleaning. “I love being outside with friends picking fruit appreciated by people who frequent food pantries,” he said. “People often receive canned goods and unsold grocery food items but rarely fresh fruit. And San Diego is fruit country (oranges, tangerines, lemons, grapefruits, avocados apples, and pears are among the County’s produce surplus). “We often pass trees loaded with fruit and within a few weeks, the fruit is unsightly, rotting on the ground, attracting insects and feeding rats,” he continued. “To date, we’ve collected less than 10 percent of what’s available, leaving huge untapped resources.” Turner noted that it’s now standard practice for nationwide grocery chain stores to connect with groups like the Senior Gleaners to ensure that edible food is feeding the hungry, not landfills. “Food organizations like ours are being tapped into after a recently enacted state law that requires cities and counties to reduce the amount of organic, soon to be toxic material, to be dumped into landfills,” he said. Senior Gleaners supply small distribution groups – those not served by large food banks – which includes churches, senior centers, low-income housing units and food pantries. Volunteers are needed for gleaning and transporting at least 300 pounds of produce to Heaven's Windows, a satellite facility of the San Diego Food Bank and Feeding America. There is no minimum time requirement, however all volunteers must be 55 or older. Donors receive detailed receipts to claim tax deductions. The federal Good Samaritan Food Donation Act protects donors from liability for “damages incurred as the result of illness,” as long as the donor has not “acted with negligence or intentional misconduct.” The Senior Gleaners of San Diego County is a certified non-profit organization affiliated with the San Diego County Office of Aging and Independent Services/ Retired and Senior Volunteer Program, a nationwide program that encourages seniors to serve their community. For more information, visit seniorgleanerssdco.org.
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    91-year-old La Jolla volunteer cleans up Coast Walk’s clutter
    by VICTORIA DAVIS
    Mar 08, 2019 | 32125 views | 3 3 comments | 13 13 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    A new sign has been added to the Coast Walk Trail to educate visitors about the Marine Protected Area. 
DON BALCH / VILLAGE NEWS
    A new sign has been added to the Coast Walk Trail to educate visitors about the Marine Protected Area. DON BALCH / VILLAGE NEWS
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    John Abbe
    John Abbe
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    From repainting railings and benches to removing invasive plant species, Brenda Fake, founder of Friends of Coast Walk, says it has “taken a village” to maintain La Jolla’s beloved Coast Walk Trail. Focusing on the safety and environmental preservation and restoration of the sea-side trail, the nonprofit has partnered with the City of San Diego on a few Coast Walk repairs, but Fake says it’s primarily the informal efforts of community members that has helped Coast Walk to thrive. “If it weren’t for our volunteers, things would not be as cleaned up or as nice as they are along the parks,” said Fake. “These people do this without any acknowledgement, but just with this sincere desire to keep their park clean.” One of Coast Walk Trail’s oldest volunteers is John Abbe, a 91-year-old Casa de Manana Retirement Community resident. With a plastic bag, trash grabber and “clothes I don’t care about ruining” as his equipment, Abbe goes out once a week to pick up the garbage along the trail that hikers leave behind. The avid volunteer also cuts back trail weeds and excess brush in addition to sweeping bench areas. “I like the term ‘volunteer’ because when people see you picking up trash along a road or trail, they think you’re working off a DUI or something,” said Abbe. “Or they think you’re homeless looking for stuff to recycle. I’m neither one of those. This isn’t for my own satisfaction, but to acknowledge that we need people to be more contentious along the coast. La Jolla Village itself has a real problem with littering.” Abbe used to work with the American River Parkway foundation when he and his wife, Carol, lived in Sacramento. He says he has always had an affinity for community service and, after moving to La Jolla two years ago, noticed the Coast Walk Trail’s need for some TLC. “The city does pick up along the areas where there’s access by pick-up truck, but when they get up to the cove here where the trail starts, that’s as far as they go,” said Abbe who has picked up everything from baby shoes to beach towels and even some collapsible chairs. “The Coast Walk Trail itself is not policed by sanitation or pick-up people like it should be.” According to Fake, the Parks and Beaches personnel collect trash at only three places along the half-mile trail: the parking area on Coast Walk, the trail head on Prospect, and at the trail head by the Cave Shop. While Timothy W. Graham, spokesperson for the City of San Diego, says the trash cans at each location are “checked daily and emptied as needed,” there’s about a quarter stretch of trail where littering has not been maintained, until Abbe came along. “John looks after that trail like it’s his own yard,” said Bill Robbins, unofficial “Mayor of The Cove” who is also a retiree and trail clean-up volunteer. “He’s part of my merry band of ‘Litter Gitters.’” In the very beginning, Abbe did an experiment where he put out five white plastic buckets – which he salvaged from the dumpsters in the back on Casa – along the Coast Walk benches as make-shift trash cans. Abbe would come and empty out the buckets every three or four days but recently had to abandon that tactic due to people stealing the buckets. Abbe plans to put the buckets back out on the trail in the summer when foot traffic is at its highest. Though his hope is for the city to eventually take the reins, Abbe sees the immeasurable value in localized efforts. “Government doesn’t always have the money to service all community needs, so they rely heavily on volunteers and nonprofits to fill the gaps,” said Abbe. “This is the final career of my whole life and, believe it or not, I get more job satisfaction from this than any regular jobs I’ve had before.” For those interested in getting involved as volunteers with the Coast Walk Trail, go to friendsofcoastwalk.org.
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    my helper
    |
    March 14, 2019
    After being in relationship with Wilson for seven years,he broke up with me, I did everything possible to bring him back but all was in vain, I wanted him back so much because of the love I have for him, I begged him with everything, I made promises but he refused. I explained my problem to someone online and she suggested that I should contact a spell caster that could help me cast a spell to bring him back but I am the type that don't believed in spell, I had no choice than to try it, I meant a spell caster called Dr AKHERE and I email him, and he told me there was no problem that everything will be okay before three days, that my ex will return to me before three days, he cast the spell and surprisingly in the second day, it was around 4pm. My ex called me, I was so surprised, I answered the call and all he said was that he was so sorry for everything that happened, that he wanted me to return to him, that he loves me so much. I was so happy and went to him, that was how we started living together happily again. Since then, I have made promise that anybody I know that have a relationship problem, I would be of help to such person by referring him or her to the only real and powerful spell caster who helped me with my own problem and who is different from all the fake ones out there. Anybody could need the help of the spell caster, his email: AKHERETEMPLE@gmail.com

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    call/whatsapp: 2349057261346 you can email him if you need his assistance in your relationship or anything. CONTACT HIM NOW FOR SOLUTION TO ALL YOUR PROBLEMS

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    Beteur Dawler
    |
    March 09, 2019
    Thank you John Abbe for the volunteer work you do to keep the trail safe and clean. You are a very good role model and I hope others are inspired by your work and message to volunteer where-ever their hearts lead them.
    anna lucas
    |
    March 08, 2019
    Hello viewer’s

    I don’t have much to say there are so may scammers going on online so we cant detect the real herbal medicine doctors. Thank GOD for leading me, please don’t ignore this post is real Dr Emmanuel, is a real herbal Doctor, he cured me from Herpes virus, i am living so happy and free , i was fully recovered within 4 weeks of usage of dr Emmanuel herbal medicine ,please viewers out there that have any deadly disease don't fail to contact him via his email; nativehealthclinic@gmail.com or WhatsApp/Call: 2348140073965 thanks once again to dr Emmanuel GOD bless you abundantly
    News
    ‘The Talented Nine’ at La Jolla Country Day
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    Published - Friday, March 22
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    La Jolla Shores Association comes out against allowing vehicle habitation
    La Jolla Shores Association approved writing a letter to the city in March protesting neighborhood vehicle habitation. San Diego City Council recently repealed a 1983 ordinance prohibiting resident...
    Published - Friday, March 22
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    Sip, shop and Enjoya La Jolla on Saturday nights
    In March, La Jolla Village Merchants Association introduced Enjoya La Jolla, an upcoming monthly Saturday night twilight event promoting the Village. “We’ve got a lot happening with marketing and w...
    Published - Friday, March 22
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    SD Audubon Society and volunteers to help endangered California Least Tern
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    Published - Friday, March 22
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    Police finally solve La Jolla murder that occurred in 1979
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    Published - Thursday, March 21
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    Local environmentalists favor regional Green New Deal for San Diego
    Local environmentalists are endorsing a San Diego Green New Deal to develop a regional vision to fight climate change and build economic sustainability. According to an annual report card compiled ...
    Published - Thursday, March 21
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    LIVE MUSIC: Rising country music star Stephanie Quayle to perform at Moonshine Beach
    Stephanie Quayle comes to Moonshine Beach for a two-night stand on March 22–23. Recently named one of CMT’s “Next Women Of Country” Class of 2019, Quayle is currently touring behind her new single,...
    Published - Thursday, March 21
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    La Jolla Symphony & Chorus executive director Diane Salisbury announces retirement
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    Published - Wednesday, March 20
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    BRIEFS: New mural in La Jolla, free watercolor class and more
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    Published - Wednesday, March 20
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    La Jolla woman pleads guilty to health and safety code violations
    A La Jolla woman pleaded guilty Monday, March 18 to five misdemeanor counts of the health and safety code violations involving improper maintenance, mold, and exposed electrical wiring in 2017 at t...
    Published - Wednesday, March 20
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    La Jolla Community Center's 'Last Friday Jazz' and other upcoming concerts
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    Published - Wednesday, March 20
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    Surf City Pizza & Gelato opens in Pacific Beach
    Gary Zendell bootstrapped himself into the Pacific Beach restaurant business. The owner of recently opened Surf City Pizza & Gelato at 4263 Mission Blvd., formerly a Subway, has come full circle. H...
    Published - Wednesday, March 20
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    Rock Church responds to Body Shop problems in Midway District
    The Rock Church has responded to criticism that the Body Shop strip club it bought in the Midway District last year is languishing, and that drugs and trash in the neighborhood has worsened. “The b...
    Published - Wednesday, March 20
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    Malashock Dance to present ‘Art of Dance’ with fashion, dance, and culinary arts
    Malashock Dance will hold its third annual Art of Dance fundraising celebration featuring high-fashion contemporary dance, craft cocktails, and culinary arts inspired by Marc Chagall's painting, "T...
    Published - Wednesday, March 20
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