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    ISA Adaptive Surf Championships celebrate second year
    by BLAKE BUNCH
    Dec 08, 2016 | 5941 views | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Surfer at the inaugural ISA Adpative Surf Championships, La Jolla Shores, 2015. Photo Credit: ISA.
    Surfer at the inaugural ISA Adpative Surf Championships, La Jolla Shores, 2015. Photo Credit: ISA.
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    Water is therapeutic – especially salt water. Despite any surfer’s theological stance, all surfers maintain a saintly reverence and keen desire to fully understand the ocean. Regardless of this truth, surfers (as well as most people) can be rather exclusive – protecting “their” break or clique from those deemed unworthy. Out of the water, those with adaptive issues have to endure excruciating social and kinesthetic issues. In the water, however, and on top of whatever board can work, one can blissfully block out the chatter. No thinking, just instinct and reaction. Adaptive or not, they love to surf and – for the second year in a row – the International Surf Association (ISA) will be hosting the “Stance World Adaptive Surfing Championships” from Dec. 8 to 11. Fernando Aguerre, from Mar de Plata, Argentina, fell in love with surfing as a young child. When a military dictatorship banned surfing in his country 1976, he founded the first Argentinian National Surfing Association. In 1994, after having competed in several ISA events as a surfer, he was elected president of ISA. Currently based out of Bird Rock, Aguerre’s passion for surfing and the disenfranchised is tangible. Following a great deal of success and international excitement seen from the inaugural competition, Aguerre aims to keep the event in California – where it all began. “You know, there was such a buzz following last year’s competition,” said Aguerre. “In a lot of places around the world, these athletes are viewed as second and third class citizens. California is different, however, and is why we chose to have the competition in La Jolla.” Aguerre further explained that athlete’s who participated in 2015 witnessed how U.S. society takes care of those with limitations, and went back to their respective countries demanding equality. This year’s competition, which is sponsored by Stance surf socks, will entail roughly eighty entrants from over twenty-two countries. At last year’s event, there were about sixty surfers from eighteen countries. A range of categories will be available under which to surf, as no two individuals are alike. Boards of various sizes, shapes and adaptive design will be seen at the competition. “We call it an ‘adaptive’ competition, not only for the athletes adapting their skills, but also the creativity into the equipment they use,” said Aguerre. “As surfers, we are all constantly adapting. One you catch a wave, you aren’t thinking. Instinct takes over then, and you forget about whatever stressors the day may have entailed. It truly is therapeutic.” Solace can be found in numbers, and that is ultimately a goal of ISA’s. While one may be discouraged regarding their functional capabilities, an event like this shows them that they aren’t the only one with a particular issue or limitation. They can talk with others who have endured similar difficulties, or simply get out and be stoked on surfing. “My wife and I surfed the Shores today,” said Aguerre. “I heard a surfer speaking in Argentinian Spanish, with someone telling him when to go. He was blind, and another athlete was coaching him into a wave. That is truly why we host this event, to come together as humans and surfers.” For more pictures or information about ISA’s World Adaptive Surfing Championship, visit www.isasurf.org/events/isa-world-adaptive-surfing-championship/.
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    San Diego fares well on Climate Action Campaign’s report card
    Dec 07, 2016 | 10185 views | 1 1 comments | 8 8 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Downtown San Diego as seen from Mission Bay. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Downtown San Diego as seen from Mission Bay. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    Climate Action Campaign unveiled the inaugural edition of their Climate Plan Report Card on Dec. 7, which grades the climate action plans, or lack thereof, of all 19 San Diego municipalities in the region. Only the City of San Diego – who received national accolades when it adopted a binding 100 percent clean energy Climate Action Plan last year – earned a gold designation. Zero cities earned a silver grade, while Del Mar, San Marcos and Carlsbad all took home the bronze designation for their climate action plans. Read the full Climate Action Plan Report Card at www.climateactioncampaign.org. “The City of San Diego continues to lead the way with its groundbreaking Climate Action Plan and is honored to be recognized as the new standard for other cities to follow,” said Cody Hooven, chief sustainability officer at the City of San Diego. “In the year since the plan was formally adopted, we’ve already begun to make significant investments that will help reduce greenhouse gas emissions and create a cleaner tomorrow for our neighborhoods.” Climate Action Campaign published the report card to serve as a tool for cities, advocates, and the public to understand the best practices for protecting families’ future from climate change. By enhancing transparency and accountability, the report card seeks to incentivize local cities to take action through friendly competition and collaboration. “In the face of a new president threatening to dismantle federal progress on climate and clean energy, leadership from local governments is more important than ever,” said Nicole Capretz, executive director of Climate Action Campaign. “We hope our report card will inform the public about what their city is doing to slash carbon pollution and protect their kids’ future. There are 19 local governments in our region, yet only seven had gradable climate plans. Our goal is to spur even more cities to take action to safeguard our quality of life.” The first edition of the Climate Plan Report Card assigns points and gives grades based on the goals and strategies contained in each plan. As CAPs become a mainstay throughout our region, future editions of the report card will measure how effectively local governments are actually implementing their plans. Here’s what local leaders are saying: “Even if we stop emitting greenhouse gasses tomorrow, there will still be significant Sea Level Rise (SLR) affecting our region over the next several decades. It is imperative that we address and prepare for those changes in ways that preserve our quality of life and the very resources that draw us to San Diego, like our beaches and waves. The earlier we start planning, the more options there will be. The challenges are real and we hope that cities will address them proactively and responsibly though robust Climate Action Plans” said Julia Chunn, Surfrider San Diego. “The implementation of Climate Action Plans is vital to combat climate change, protect our children's health, promote an innovative and green economy, and above all – invest in our most vulnerable communities historically impacted by pollution. We must ensure that the focus is on equity so that every child, regardless of their zip code, has a better future with clean air, clean energy, and clean jobs” said San Diego District 9 City Councilwoman-elect Georgette Gómez. “Climate Action Campaign’s report card shows San Diego is a national leader, however, a substantial amount of hard work is needed to keep raising the bar throughout our whole region,” said Daniel Sullivan, founder and president of Sullivan Solar Power. “Locally, solar is contributing over $1 billion in economic activity each year and is serving more than 100,000 rooftop solar customers in San Diego. We will continue working with industry partners, government officials, and groups like Climate Action Campaign to lead a solar energy revolution that systematically unplugs entire communities from outdated fossil fuels.”
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    December 08, 2016
    How do you fail at something that's fake?
    Susan G. Komen San Diego 3-Day walk raises $7.6 million
    Dec 04, 2016 | 17814 views | 0 0 comments | 7 7 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Jenny Dich and Heidi Howard from Redmond, Wash., finish up day two of the Susan G. Komen San Diego 3-Day Walk at Crown Point Park in Pacific Beach. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Jenny Dich and Heidi Howard from Redmond, Wash., finish up day two of the Susan G. Komen San Diego 3-Day Walk at Crown Point Park in Pacific Beach. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    Jenny Dich and Heidi Howard from Redmond, Wash., look for their tent in a sea of pink on day two of the Susan G. Komen San Diego 3-Day Walk at Crown Point Park in Pacific Beach. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Jenny Dich and Heidi Howard from Redmond, Wash., look for their tent in a sea of pink on day two of the Susan G. Komen San Diego 3-Day Walk at Crown Point Park in Pacific Beach. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    Thousands of Susan G. Komen San Diego 3-Day participants – women and men – walked 60-miles over the course of three-days in the fight for a world without breast cancer, raising $7.6 million. These funds will benefit breast cancer research and community outreach programs. Since 2003, the San Diego 3-Day has raised more than $113 million. “We could not accomplish this feat without our incredible participants,” said Carrie Stovall, Susan G. Komen events director. “The preparation and dedication of these walkers is inspiring and helps us get closer each day to eliminating this disease.” Participants spend months training and fundraising to prepare for the Susan G. Komen San Diego 3-Day. Throughout this weekend, lifelong friendship and memories are formed in honor of those who have battled and for those who continue to fight breast cancer. Participants spent the weekend walking through San Diego communities and camping in pink tents each night. What began early Friday morning at the Del Mar Fairgrounds concluded with a moving closing ceremony Nov. 20 at Waterfront Park. Susan G. Komen has provided more than $920 million in funding for breast cancer research and $2 billion in funding to screening, education, treatment and psychosocial support programs serving millions of people in more than 30 countries worldwide. For more information or to register for the 2017 Susan G. Komen San Diego 3-Day, visit The3Day.org. For opportunities to support the breast cancer movement in San Diego year-round – including through the Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure – contact the Susan G. Komen San Diego affiliate at 858-573-2760 or www.komensandiego.org.
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    The future of San Diego healthcare is here
    by BLAKE BUNCH
    Dec 01, 2016 | 7422 views | 0 0 comments | 8 8 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    The Jacobs Medical Center is located at 310 Medical Center Drive.
    The Jacobs Medical Center is located at 310 Medical Center Drive.
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    Jacobs Medical Center opens on UCSD's East Campus On Sunday, Nov. 20, UC San Diego Health opened the doors to the $943 million Jacobs Medical Center. The new 245-bed facility represents a future wave of healthcare for the area, boasting iPads as room controls, floor-length windows and various technological amenities to enhance a patient’s care. While many San Diegans question the direct need for such a large-capacity healthcare facility, Dr. David Brenner, vice chancellor for health services and dean of the School of Medicine at UCSD, finds that by 2030 most will be singing a different tune. The project, which has roughly taken a decade or so to come to fruition from the idea stage to completed construction, will suit specified needs of San Diegans for years to come. “It was always a long-term goal of ours to build a healthcare facility that was contiguous with the rest of UCSD’s School of Medicine,” said Dr. Brenner. “Now that this project has come to completion, this world-class hospital and research center have brought our educational and healthcare system ahead of the curve.” Named after Joan and Irwin Jacobs, who provided around $100 million in gifts to UCSD, the new building reflects a continued healthcare “boom” in San Diego—and southern California at large. Mr. Jacobs arrived in San Diego in 1966, and was the co-founder of Qualcomm. When he first arrived, Jacobs noted that UCSD had “just opened a medical school, but retained no hospital of any kind.” “We are committed to providing outstanding medical care for San Diego,” said Dr. Brenner. “By 2030, a good deal of our existing facilities will be rendered seismically unfit. While that may seem like the distant future, this foresight will ultimately provide San Diegans with the care they need. We want residents to have access to healthcare without having to leave the city. Ten years ago, that was not the case.” The 509,000 square-foot, ten-story facility includes three specialty wings: The Rady Pavilion for Women and Infants, the Pauline and Stanley Foster Pavilion for Cancer and the A. Vassiliadis Family Pavilion for Advanced Surgery. Similar to Jacobs’ case, all of the wards are also named after philanthropists. Dr. Brenner touts these three separate pavilions for their specialized care. “The top floor (Rady Pavilion) will serve women and infants in high-risk pregnancy situations,” said Dr. Brenner. “Directly underneath, and for the first time in the history of San Diego, cancer patients are able to walk about the ward.” These patients are presented this tremendous ability due to the fact that the entire Foster Pavilion is pressurized to suit those undergoing chemotherapy. The Vassiliadis Family Pavilion presents one of the greatest achievements for the facility, and is where neurosurgery, organ transplants, advanced imaging and other specialized surgery will take place. It must be noted that all 245 rooms are equipped with “knowledge walls,” which allow patients to control the comfort of their own room, as well as procure information regarding their current conditions. “One thing most people tend to overlook, is that our older hospitals will be deemed unsuitable relatively soon,” said Dr. Brenner. “With the Jacobs Medical Center, we can provide exclusive care for all San Diegans.” The facility is now open, and has generally received outstanding reviews from those who have occupied its new wards. Though some remain shortsighted, this overall advancement in medicine is arguably beneficial for all residents of America’s Finest City.
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    North Course at Torrey Pines reopens after $12.6 million renovation
    Nov 29, 2016 | 14225 views | 1 1 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Torrey Pines North Course - No. 15. Photo credit: Torrey Pines Golf Course
    Torrey Pines North Course - No. 15. Photo credit: Torrey Pines Golf Course
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    Following a comprehensive nine-month, $12.6 million renovation, the North Course at Torrey Pines Golf Course has reopened to an eagerly awaiting golfing public. Originally designed by William F. Bell and opened in 1957, the renovated North Course now stands to rival the popularity of the world famous South Course, host of the U.S. Open in 2008 and in 2021. The North and South courses, owned and maintained by the City, are both public courses, and the North averages approximately 82,000 rounds of play per year. “We are excited to re-open the North Course to the global golf community,” said Herman Parker, director of Park and Recreation for the City of San Diego. “Torrey Pines is a world-renowned golf facility, and we are pleased to be able to offer two outstanding courses, each with their own unique characteristics. Now, no San Diego golf excursion is complete without playing both the North and South at Torrey.” Course architect and golfing great Tom Weiskopf visited Torrey Pines this week to officially unveil the renovated North Course, a project that holds a special place in his golf career and design portfolio. His first career win came at Torrey Pines at the 1968 Andy Williams-San Diego Open, predecessor to the current Farmers Insurance Open played every January at Torrey Pines. “It’s really special,” Wesikopf said. “And to work on a piece of property that amazing doesn’t happen very often. The sheer beauty of the place always captivates me. Now people can look forward to playing 36 incredible holes at Torrey Pines by playing the North and the South.” While the North Course maintains a similar feel to its original design, there were some significant changes. The number of bunkers has been reduced from 59 to 41, and the average green size increased from 4,500 square feet to 6,400. All 18 greens were completely reconstructed to United States Golf Association standards, with the existing poa annua grass replaced with 100 percent bent grass – a Tyee 007 blend. The front and back nines were also reversed, allowing golfers spectacular ocean and canyon views as they finish their rounds. Carts paths have been replaced, and irrigation has been improved. Greens were fitted with an advanced SubAir system that pulls moisture out of the surface and can cool greens during hot weather. The work was completed on time and on budget. “Switching the nines is very significant because the back nine is so iconic with its incredible views,” Weiskopf said. “The larger greens allow for more pin placements and more variety, and we’ve taken out bunkers but kept others that are strategically placed.” Weiskopf’s renovations have successfully struck a balance between providing ample challenge for professional and scratch golfers and keeping the course playable for amateurs and casual golfers of all abilities. The North Course now features five sets of tees, allowing it to play as long as 7,258 yards or as short as 5,197. In total, the North has been lengthened nearly 200 yards from the tips. “I tried to bring the North Course into the 21st century,” Weiskopf said. “It was built in the 1950s, and nothing of significance had ever been done to it. Everything we did in the redesign was to bring it up to current standards. It’s now a top-of-the-line golf course.” Weiskopf Design Group has completed 60 golf course design projects since 1985. Among those are five that have been included in Golf Magazine’s list of the top 100 courses in the world – Troon Golf and Country Club (Scottsdale, Ariz.); Forest Highlands Golf Club, The Canyon Course (Flagstaff, Ariz.); Troon North Golf Club, The Monument (Scottsdale, Ariz.); Loch Lomond Golf Club (Scotland) and Double Eagle Club (Galena, Ohio). Weiskopf was named Golf Architect of the Year by Golf World magazine in 1996. A winner of 16 tournaments during his nearly 30-year career on the PGA Tour, Weiskopf owns one major championship trophy (The Open Championship, 1973) and finished third or better in six other majors. Housed within the City of San Diego Park and Recreation Department, the City’s Golf Division manages and operates Mission Bay, Balboa Park and Torrey Pines golf courses. Its mission is to serve patrons and players of all ages and abilities while enhancing their enjoyment of the game by providing a high quality golf experience. For more information about the City’s Golf Division, visit www.sandiego.gov/golf.
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    AB2ski
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    November 29, 2016
    Ahhhh, my old home course while growing up in the 80's! Played Jr. Golf and H.S. Golf there, and just lots of good memories with my dad. Can't wait to get back there and try it out.
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