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    Anonymous donation fuels Scripps' plan for ocean-study hardware
    Sep 18, 2014 | 9962 views | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Big, ugly underwater cameras like these are a step closer to inclusion in the research  arsenal at Scripps Institution of Oceanography. COURTESY PHOTO
    Big, ugly underwater cameras like these are a step closer to inclusion in the research arsenal at Scripps Institution of Oceanography. COURTESY PHOTO
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    An anonymous donor to UCSD's Scripps Institution of Oceanography has committed $500,000 to bring sensor, instrument and platform concepts developed by Scripps scientists to completion, enabling creation of equipment that will allow new types of measurements, detection and extended power capabilities for ocean research. “This generous gift will accelerate our ability to observe and measure the ocean through the development of a new generation of viable research instruments,” said Margaret Leinen, Scripps Oceanography director. “We are grateful for this investment from a donor with the vision to support the transformative research interests of our innovative scientists.” Underwater cameras and microscopes allow scientists to look closely, even in 3-D, at freely floating, minute organisms that drift with water currents. These close-ups provide unprecedented views of critical components of the marine environment. Many federal sources of funding for the projects' instrumentation are focused on developing new instrument concepts – research into instrumentation rather than deployable instruments – making it difficult to secure funding. Meanwhile, Scripps researchers have developed many innovative inventions, such as floats, gliders, cameras, 3-D microscopes, earthquake sensors and pH detectors for ocean acidification. The donor, therefore, sought to support unique equipment development not commercially available or fabricated from off-the-shelf components. Proposal criteria focused on completing new instruments. A rigorous competitive process narrowed the field from 27 proposal submissions and resulted in awards for innovation and invention to three Scripps research teams: Making Spectrophotometric Seawater pH Measurements Convenient, Andrew Dickson, professor of marine chemistry, Scripps Marine Physical Laboratory With increasing levels of carbon dioxide accumulating in the atmosphere and dissolving into seawater, the world's oceans are becoming more acidic. The Dickson laboratory provides reference samples of seawater that are used to ensure worldwide uniformity in measurements of these changes. An automated system that can efficiently make reliable and precise measurements of the pH of seawater samples is critical to the study of ocean acidification. Dickson has a prototype precision pH measuring system that uses a spectrophotometric approach to measure the color of a pH indicator dye. With this funding, he and his team will optimize the existing system to produce a system more compact and better suited for widespread laboratory use. Scripps Plankton Camera System, Jules Jaffe, research oceanographer, Scripps Marine Physical Laboratory Jaffe is the innovator of new technology for observing oceanic phenomena and the development of inverse techniques for their interpretation. Funds will enable complete development of the Scripps Plankton Camera System (a prototype dark field zooplankton microscope system initiated under separate funding) and support its operation for at least one year. This new funding will also support the addition of a higher-resolution phytoplankton imaging system. The installation will consist of two in situ dark field microscopes with compact computers performing realtime image processing and object detection. Output from these microscopes will be broadcast to the Internet, where scientists, students and the public can explore and tag data from the system with realtime access. C-Gen: Power Generation for Remote Oceanographic Instruments from Ambient Ocean Currents, Drew Lucas,Matthew Alford, Michael Goldin, and Robert Pinkel, Scripps Marine Physical Laboratory With this gift, the Scripps science team will construct an electrical power generator that uses the energy of ocean currents to provide power for individual oceanographic sensors. Generating 1 to 10 watts from a compact, simple device will address a modern, practical oceanographic challenge: the power limitation of long-term oceanographic observations. The project will deploy the generator in a “clip-on” mode, where it attaches to a conventional sensor package and continually recharges sensor batteries. Alternatively, it can be deployed within a moored string of instruments to power clusters of sensors or along optical fiber communications lines to enable the transfer of data from remote instruments back to shore. – Staff and contribution
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    SAFELY AT HOME
    Sep 18, 2014 | 511 views | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Attack submarine USS La Jolla, the neighborhood's military namesake, returned to Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam on Sept. 3 following its final regularly scheduled deployment before its decommissioning later this year. The 360-foot submarine was under way for 150 days of its 180-day deployment and traveled 35,000 nautical miles, conducting port visits in Japan, Thailand, Singapore and Malaysia, with Commanding Officer Cmdr. Kevin Roach praising the crew's efforts during the deployment to the Western Pacific. The La Jolla is scheduled for conversion to a training to be permanently moored at Charleston, S.C.
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    Planning group votes down parade name change following request for closure of streets
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Sep 18, 2014 | 1151 views | 2 2 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    The Christmas Parade name change is one issue that never changes from year to year.
    The Christmas Parade name change is one issue that never changes from year to year.
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    A routine request to close down streets for the annual December La Jolla Christmas Parade turned into a debate over making the parade’s name faith-neutral, with the issue voted down 9-5-2 by La Jolla Community Planning Association trustees in September. The meeting took an unanticipated twist as Cindy Marten, San Diego Unified School District superintendent, speaking as a private citizen, supported the ongoing effort to remove Christmas from the La Jolla parade name and have it changed to something more generic, like “holiday.” “Yes, I do support looking at a name for the parade that is faith-neutral and inclusive of all faiths and cultures,” Marten emailed after the meeting. “While the parade may be privately funded, the use of public city streets makes it a community event.” Marten noted a discussion over a possible name change “offers us the opportunity – as a wider community – to have a meaningful, collaborative discussion about inclusivity that allows people to express their opinions without judgment and with politics aside. This is especially timely given the increasing diversity of our American workplace – a good thing – and the associated challenges with observing religious-based holidays.” Marten added that the issue of changing the parade name “may be a question for local school leaders to discuss whether participation in events with faith-based names is appropriate. I am not suggesting specific action or a future agenda item – just that it may be timely to have a more global discussion.” Later news reports said that Marten may prohibit school bands from performing in the parade if the name is not changed. A couple association trustees and private citizens in attendance said they felt discussion of the parade name change was inappropriate given that the item was agendized strictly as a traffic and transportation-related street closure, with no mention of the proposed parade name change. Trustee Francis O’Neill Zimmerman disagreed, stating it was impossible to consider closing down public streets without discussing the purpose — and symbolism — of the private parade and what it represents to the community. “We (trustees) are being asked to approve the closing of streets for an event whose name is extremely contentious,” Zimmerman said. “We ought to rethink our support for that endorsement. I don’t think we should be endorsing stuff that needs reflection and change. We have an opportunity here to get a more neutral name that is more inclusive.” Association colleague Ray Weiss said he was “sympathetic to concerns about the name of the parade,” pointing out that name “represents the town.” He added “public streets belong to all the people.” “The only way we (trustees) have any leverage here is by denying the street closures for this parade,” pointed out trustee Rob Whittemore. The argument was made that changing administration of the year-end parade, once run by La Jolla Town Council but now handled by a private, nonprofit foundation, was done deliberately as an “end-around” to avoid the parade name change controversy. Trustee Cindy Greatrex, also a town council member and immediate past president of that group, denied that claim, noting the move to create a separate private foundation and split it from town council was done so that more contributors would be encouraged to donate to the parade because of its tax-exempt status. In other action: • Following the debate, trustees voted 10-1-4 to reject a city letter that maintained the planning group violated its bylaws by not immediately seating a disputed board candidate, architect Michael Morton. • Trustees gave thumbs up to plans by George Hauer to convert his restaurant at 1250 Prospect St. to expand his rooftop dining terrace. The vote was 10-4-2.
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    RobertoAllderdice
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    September 19, 2014
    An early lesson for any student is: "Do Your Homework". Superintendent Marten has clearly forgotten that lesson. If she had done any homework on her new and ill-advised partner Howard Singer, she would have learned that his platform is not Diversity or Inclusion, but simply Atheism. He is certainly entitled to his viewpoints but somehow Marten fails to note the train she has jumped on, or what the jump will mean for her politically.

    Howard Singer is quite public about his beliefs, with no subterfuge:

    http://www.meetup.com/London-Atheist-Activist-Group-friendly-community/members/95367172/

    The question is how closely Marten will continue to hew to her new partner and his publicly affirmed beliefs. Singer advertises in the La Jolla Light (9/18/2014) that this will be publicly discussed this weekend.

    His fledgling group "The San Diego County Diversity and Inclusiveness Group" has a website and a Meetup now so as to answer questions. Currently they show have two listed Members so they are obviously trying to change that. http://www.meetup.com/humanistfellowship/members/95367172/ As they advertise in the La Jolla Light newspaper each week, they state they are looking for community feedback from all sides. Particularly this week as Marten continues her crusade to change the name of the La Jolla Christmas Parade and Holiday Festival, using her position as no less than a bully pulpit.

    This group is running community advertising stating that they want residents to meet with them at 8:15 each Sunday morning at Starbucks on Torrey Pines Road La Jolla, to receive commentary.

    To RSVP: Howard Singer 858-454-4586.

    For Media Inquiries, their Public contact information is:

    San Diego County Diversity and Inclusiveness Group

    5915 La Jolla Hermosa Avenue La Jolla CA 92037 858-454-4586

    rima1@sbcglobal.net

    RobertoAllderdice
    |
    September 19, 2014
    Cindy Marten doesn't have enough problems, it seems. This is hard to believe but apparently the case. Instead of dealing with the folly of her armored personnel carrier for schools, or her ever-declining test scores, or the various litigation in the District in any given month, she has plenty of free time in her schedule to drive up to La Jolla, a Village where she does not reside, recreate or worship, and tell us how to run our affairs. And she does this from a bully pulpit, stating publicly and on-record that she may advise parents to not allow their children to attend the parade or practice their band instruments with holiday tunes used at the Parade. If she did this to a Hanukkah or Kwanzaa Parade she would be run out on the rails, as should be. She needs to go back to school herself, before she even considers her future role as Superintendent, and learn about Amendment rights and Freedom to Assemble. She is one educator who has a lot to learn.
    Village's public right-of-way is target of clean-up effort amid city code enforcement
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Sep 18, 2014 | 493 views | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    A cluster of signs underscores the intrusions onto the Village's right-of-way and the effort to remedy it. COURTESY PHOTO
    A cluster of signs underscores the intrusions onto the Village's right-of-way and the effort to remedy it. COURTESY PHOTO
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    With the aid of the city and code enforcement sweeps, coastal communities like La Jolla are cleaning up their acts, eliminating illegal signage and intrusions into the public right-of-way (PROW). “We want to make this an educational process, not a shaming of business owners,” said Sheila Fortune, executive director of the La Jolla Village Merchants Association (LJVM), a business improvement district (BID). Through the public right-of-way enhancement program, merchants with ground-level storefronts in the city’s 12 BIDs are able to use the sidewalks in front of their businesses to place A-frame signs, limited displays of merchandise and outdoor cafés without railings. The PROW program is designed to provide a lively experience for pedestrians and diners and give merchants more leeway to expand their businesses, enhancing profit. But there are rules to be followed by merchants — guidelines to be met. “The San Diego Municipal Code prohibits unpermitted encroachments in the public right-of-way including but not limited to: portable A-frame signs, certain types of outdoor display items, umbrellas and other impediments in the PROW,” said Mike Richmond, deputy director of the code enforcement division for the city’s Development Services Department. Richmond noted BIDs like La Jolla’s have a “certain amount of flexibility” in allowing changes related to PROW enhancement. And the city’s there to make sure PROW program standards are instituted and maintained. “The code enforcement division of the Development Services Department conducts investigations and enforcement of PROW encroachments on a complaint basis,” said Richmond, adding, “This includes business locations outside of the BID boundaries or locations within BID areas where the BID has not been able to get voluntary compliance through their required notification process.” Once a code violation is identified by the division investigator, an administrative citation warning is issued that describes the required compliance requirements and time deadline, Richmond said. “If compliance is not achieved by that deadline,” he added, “an administrative citation with a monetary fine is issued. These citations may be appealed by the responsible party, which requires an administrative hearing before an independent administrative hearing officer. A large percentage of cases involving PROW encroachments get resolved by this level of administrative remedy.” Erin Demorest. from 1st District Councilwoman Sherri Lightner’s office, said that “some businesses on one block in the Village were recently visited by a land development investigator who issued warnings about sign violations. No citations were issued. There has been no ongoing ‘sweep.’ However, neighborhood code regularly receives and investigates complaints about signs illegally posted in the public right-of-way in the Village.” Fortune said the PROW enforcement program lagged in La Jolla during a recent transition from one BID to another. “When Promote La Jolla ended their contract with the city as their agent managing the PROW,” she said, “the program did not have local management to carry on this program for several years until LJVMA began the new BID and is now the agent for the PROW. Fortune talked about what LJVMA and the city are looking for in terms of eliminating illegal signage and visual clutter. “Signs cannot completely block the public right-of-way,” Fortune said. “Any signs in La Jolla that are freestanding must be on private property.” Noting it “can get a little tricky” determining where a private property line divides into the PROW, Fortune offered this general guideline. “Most times,” she said, “a person can tell by looking at the front of the business and following the façade of the building structure and any overhangs of the building. That should be the footprint of the building and private property. The remainder of the sidewalk is the PROW.” Fortune noted that illegal sandwich boards have proliferated in the Village over the years due to a number of factors, including the downturn in the economy; the city’s labor-force cuts and lack of staff to perform compliance inspections; lack of tourists visiting and patronizing establishments; and the need for locals to shop local. “This all fueled the need to do whatever (was) necessary for the merchants to attract business… thus, more and more signs were put in the PROW,” said Fortune. She added that LJVMA’s contract with the city gives it the responsibility of managing La Jolla’s PROW. “This is a huge task and very time consuming considering how large our BID is,” Fortune said. “Trying to educate the merchants is a job that has been ongoing for the last couple of years.” Fortune noted the city's Department of Neighborhood Code Compliance has recently hired more inspectors led by Duke Fernandez, senior land development investigator. “Mr. Fernandez and his staff are working with LJVMA to bring the Village back into compliance and clean up our PROW for all pedestrians to enjoy and safely travel,” Fortune said.
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    Mt. Soledad group seeks help for memorial and office
    Sep 03, 2014 | 29497 views | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    The Mt. Soledad Memorial Association is seeking volunteers in its La Jolla office and docents at the Mt. Soledad National Veterans Memorial atop Mt. Soledad. A variety of volunteer opportunities are available, including but not limited to memorial plaque designers, plaque salespersons, website support personnel, veteran event activities workers, social media coordinators and general administrative office workers. Volunteer docents at the site answer questions about the Memorial and conduct tours upon request. Each of the above opportunities calls for approximately three hours of service a week. Training programs are in place to orient new volunteers. “The Mt. Soledad Veterans Memorial stands as a beautiful symbol and reminder of those who have served our country since the military was established in 1775,” said Bruce Bailey, president and CEO of the memorial association. “It is only through the support of our docents and volunteers that we can continue our work in honoring and recognizing those men and women.” Senior chief Wilfred (Bill) Sturgeon has been an association volunteer and memorial docent for the past four years. He served in the Navy and retired after 24 years of military service. He served onboard seven different destroyers in the Korean and Vietnam wars. “I am one of seven docents,” Sturgeon said, “each of us helping visitors better understand the significance of this extraordinary veterans tribute, which recognizes the major contributions of those who have helped preserve the freedoms we enjoy as Americans. It’s an ideal opportunity for both veterans and nonveterans to show their patriotism while honoring those who have served our country.” Sturgeon's canine visitors are a highlight of each of his bi-weekly shifts. “Dog owners throughout San Diego regularly take their dogs up to Soledad Natural Park on daily walks,” Sturgeon said. “As the dogs near the top of the site, they break into quickstep knowing that I am working my docent shift, with pockets brimming with tasty dog biscuits. It’s a highlight for me to see the dogs but to also converse and share the association’s story with those who live right here in our own backyard.” In addition to answering questions and assisting the more than 60,000 visitors who pass through the memorial each year, Sturgeon completes weekly reports on the number of domestic and foreign visitors, visitor questions, plaque locator requests, group pictures and new plaque inquiries. This year, he initiated a program with volunteers to help maintain the appearance of the Memorial Walls and veteran plaques. He also oversees and supervises an induction program for new Navy chief petty officer selectees to help with general maintenance work at the memorial. He developed a detailed self-guided tour of the memorial and a U.S. Presidents and Medal of Honor Tour, which shows visitors where each of these distinguished veteran plaques are located on the Memorial Walls. "We are grateful,” Bailey added, “to the existing and future volunteers and docents who are willing to give their time and energy to preserving the spirit and commitment of the association. We hope to get the word out about our need for more volunteers and docents who bring the same energy and enthusiasm for our mission, as Bill has for so many years. He is truly an asset to our organization and to our community.” The Mt. Soledad Veterans Memorial is the only veterans memorial in the United States that honors veterans, living and deceased, from the Revolutionary War to the current conflicts in the Middle East. It is administered through a volunteer board of trustees and volunteers working directly with executive director Joanie Miyashiro-Brennan and her assistant Denise Larkins. The association offices are located at 6437 Caminito Blythefield, Suite B, in La Jolla. For additional information, call (858) 459-2314 or visit soledadmemorial.com.
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    News
    Synagogue ex-director given 19 months in mail fraud scheme
    The former executive director for Congregation Beth El Synagogue in La Jolla was sentenced Sept. 19 to 18 months in federal prison for embezzling almost $400,000 for lavish personal expenses during...
    Sep 22, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Sports
    50th hydros are history
    An emotional J. Michael Kelly won the 2014 Bill Muncey Cup at San Diego Bayfair hydroplane races on Sept. 14, capping the three-day event's 50th-anniversary celebration after leader Jimmy Shane was...
    Sep 19, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Opinion
    For better or worse, La Jolla may be getting what it's asking for
    Eateries with the handle "Azul" have recently closed in Seattle, San Francisco, Albuquerque and San Antonio; and now San Diego has added an entry to the list with the Sept. 2 closure of The Steakho...
    Sep 19, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Arts & Entertainment
    Tenth annual Restaurant Week: What's in a name?
    This year's San Diego Restaurant Week, organized by the local chapter of the California Restaurant Association, marks the end of the event's first decade, with more than 180 of the county's eaterie...
    Sep 19, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Business
    Harry's Coffee Shop building sold in $6 million purchase
    A San Diego developer has purchased several retail buildings with adjacent land in La Jolla for approximately $6.17 million – and one includes a landmark that traces its history to the Brooklyn Dod...
    Sep 19, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Obituaries
    James Freeman Gilbert, Scripps geophysics researcher, 83
    James Freeman Gilbert, Scripps geophysics researcher, 83 James Freeman Gilbert, a renowned professor emeritus of geophysics in the Cecil H. and Ida M. Green Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Ph...
    Aug 21, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 10 10 recommendations | email to a friend
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