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    How it all began ... Cabrillo Festival will re-create his historic landing, celebrate cultural melting pot
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Sep 24, 2014 | 6906 views | 0 0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Among the highlights of the annual Cabrillo Festival is the re-enactment of his landing at what is now Ballast Point in Point Loma. Actors in period garb will help bring the historic moment to life for visitors.
    Among the highlights of the annual Cabrillo Festival is the re-enactment of his landing at what is now Ballast Point in Point Loma. Actors in period garb will help bring the historic moment to life for visitors.
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    The festival also celebrates a mix of cultures with dancing, song and food, left.  Photo by Paul Hansen
    The festival also celebrates a mix of cultures with dancing, song and food, left. Photo by Paul Hansen
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    The cultures of Portugal, Spain, Mexico and Native America will be on full display at the 2014 Cabrillo Festival with food, dancing and historical narrations. 	                   Photo by Paul Hansen
    The cultures of Portugal, Spain, Mexico and Native America will be on full display at the 2014 Cabrillo Festival with food, dancing and historical narrations. Photo by Paul Hansen
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    What must it have been like for famed Portuguese explorer Juan Rodriguez Cabrillo, the first European explorer to discover America’s West Coast, to step foot on Ballast Point in Point Loma on Sept. 28, 1542 and plant a flag claiming it for Spain? Now you can stop imagining and re-experience the event the way it actually happened. Fast-forward 472 years to the 51st annual two-day Cabrillo Festival in Point Loma on Saturday and Sunday, Sept. 27-28. The highlight of the annual historic festival, of course, is the re-enactment of Cabrillo’s landing on the shores of San Diego Bay with actors in period garb representing Cabrillo, his soldiers and priests landing and claiming the land. A Portuguese navigator sailing under the flag of Spain, Cabrillo discovered San Diego Bay while searching for the Strait of Anian, a mythical all-water route across North America. Shortly after he left what would become San Diego, Cabrillo died of an infection on the islands outside Santa Barbara. “We’re going back in time and commemorating the voyages of exploration along the coast of California and Cabrillo’s arrival in San Diego,” said Idalmiro Manuel da Rosa, president of the Cabrillo Festival. Da Rosa said the two-day festival also highlights the culture and traditions of San Diego’s 15,000 to 20,000 Portuguese. “We have banners up and down Rosecrans Street,” said da Rosa. “The festival has the support of all local organizations, including the Point Loma Association, as well as the tremendous support of Naval Base Point Loma, which hosts the festival’s events on Sunday.” Da Rosa said the festival is a microcosm of the American melting pot. “It’s multi-cultural, multi-ethnic,” he said noting the event is done in conjunction with the local Native American Kumeyaay tribe. “It’s also important to the Spanish and Mexican communities,” said da Rosa. He said, though, that while the Portuguese community remains “the backbone of the Cabrillo Festival,” its influences embrace much of San Diego’s historic and ethnic cultures. The two-day festival kicks off Saturday, Sept. 27 at 3:30 p.m. with a commemorative ceremony and wreath laying honoring Cabrillo at the Cabrillo National Monument. The keynote speaker for the wreath ceremony will be Dr. Nuno Mathias, consul general of Portugal. The commemorative ceremony will be followed later that day from 6 to 7:30 p.m. with a Cabrillo Discovery Celebration Dinner-Dance at the Portuguese S.E.S. Hall, 2818 Avenida de Portugal in Point Loma. Sponsored by Cabrillo Civic Club No. 16 of San Diego and Portuguese-American Social and Civic Club, the event costs $50 per person. Tickets are available by calling (619) 426-0769 or (619) 221-8084. On Sunday, Sept. 28, festivities continue from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. with a free Cabrillo Festival at Ballast Point, Naval Base Point Loma, at the south end of Rosecrans Street. The multi-faceted festival features music, dancing, children’s activities and ethnic foods of Mexico, Portugal, Spain and Native America. The Cabrillo Festival is a fun, family-oriented event with educational activities, cultural demonstrations and exciting folkloric performances celebrating Native American, Mexican, Portuguese and Spanish traditions from the Age of Exploration. When Cabrillo landed in Point Loma in 1542, he had little or no inkling of its historical significance or that it would be celebrated forevermore as a landmark event or that Sept. 28 would be recognized as Cabrillo Day throughout what would become California. For more information, visit www.cabrillofestival.org.
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    Replica of Cabrillo’s ship, San Salvador, nearly ready to sail
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Sep 24, 2014 | 666 views | 0 0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    After four years, the San Salvador scaffolding has started to come down. Over the next few months, preparations for her launch will take place. Then the rigging process will begin. 		           Courtesy photo
    After four years, the San Salvador scaffolding has started to come down. Over the next few months, preparations for her launch will take place. Then the rigging process will begin. Courtesy photo
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    Visitors at the annual Cabrillo Festival can take another nostalgic journey back in time by heading down to The Maritime Museum of San Diego to check out a replica of the famed Portuguese explorer’s vessel. A full-size, fully functional and historically accurate $6.2 million replica of Juan Rodriguez Cabrillo’s flagship, San Salvador, is under construction at Spanish Landing Park on Harbor Drive and nearing completion. San Salvador was a 100-foot, full-rigged galleon with a 10-foot draft and a capacity of 200 tons. She carried officers, crew, slaves and a priest. Being built for the San Diego Maritime Museum, the replica will launch soon. The construction site, called “San Salvador Village,” opened in June 2011 and is accessible to the public. The project gives people the opportunity to see an example of 16th-century shipbuilding, which was the first modern industrial activity in the Americas. The replica galleon is 92 feet long with a beam of 24 feet. When construction is completed, San Salvador will be launched on San Diego Bay and will become part of the museum's fleet of historic and replica ships. After four years of work by some 200 volunteers, the scaffolding around the ship has started to come down. Over the next few months, preparations for her launch will take place. Then the rigging process will begin. The San Salvador was the flagship of explorer Juan Rodriguez Cabrillo in 1542 when he sailed into San Diego Bay. Cabrillo was the first European to explore the coast of California. Once it’s finished, the full-size galleon will be opened to visitors and for educational programs. Museum officials said it would also sail to ports throughout the state “as a traveling learning platform and symbol of our region’s Pacific origins and maritime heritage.” The project is partly funded by a grant from the Coastal Conservancy, a state agency established in 1976 to purchase, protect, restore and enhance California's coastal resources. The San Salvador construction site is open from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily at Spanish Landing Park south of the airport. You can also watch construction progress on a 24-hour webcam at anr.ucsd.edu/cam-eras/SLC.html. In all, Cabrillo’s expedition fleet had three ships: the 200-ton galleon San Salvador, the 100-ton La Victoria and the lateen-rigged, 26-oared San Miguel. The two other ships were not the square-rigged galleons commonly used for crossing open ocean. Rather, they were built in Navidad, Mexico, especially for exploration along the coast.
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    Sense of identity: residents, PLA forging a vision for future of Nimitz
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Sep 24, 2014 | 615 views | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Participants in a community workshop hosted by the Point Loma Association (PLA) this month view pictures and schematics of beautification projects the PLA has done to various medians around the Peninsula area in the past.  				  Photo by Dave Schwab
    Participants in a community workshop hosted by the Point Loma Association (PLA) this month view pictures and schematics of beautification projects the PLA has done to various medians around the Peninsula area in the past. Photo by Dave Schwab
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    The vision for how Nimitz Boulevard in Point Loma can be enhanced seems a lot clearer now thanks to a community workshop sponsored Sept. 17 by the Point Loma Association (PLA). Point Lomans weighed in on prospective Nimitz improvements, saying they wanted the boulevard to be safer, better landscaped and lighted with more public art. They also want Nimitz made more amenable for bicyclists. Workshop participants heard about the PLA, an organization of residents and businesses that has been committed since 1961 to improving Point Loma’s quality of life through beautification, education, charitable activities and civic collaboration. During opening remarks, PLA chairman Robert Tripp Jackson said the workshop’s goal was to engage residents in the creation of a “long-term vision of phased public improvements to the Nimitz corridor that reflect the beauty, culture and history of the Peninsula community.” PLA board members and former San Diego City Councilman Byron Wear talked about the history of the organization and the public improvement projects it’s been involved in. “Nimitz Boulevard is the only street connecting OB and Point Loma,” Wear said of the thoroughfare’s importance. “It’s the grand boulevard that we should be celebrating.” The visioning workshop was led by the PLA’s Nimitz Task Force, made up of Ron Brooks, Cecilia Carrick, Coleen Clementson, Ned Daugherty, Karen Davis, Kerri De Rosier, Dan Dennison, Jim Hare, Lee Hope, Jackson, Dick Lareau, Betsy McCullough and Wear. “We’re interested in what you have to say,” said past PLA chairwoman Cecilia Carrick. She said landscape improvements endorsed by the PLA date back to 65 jacaranda trees planted along Rosecrans Street in the 1960s. “We have evolved to having lots of plans and lots of workers, and we have done many things over the years,” she said, citing the elimination of billboard blight as one example. “Over the years, we’ve concentrated on doing more medians and more softscape, which are time-consuming, laborious projects that require a lot of planning between workers, the city and county and donors,” Carrick said. “We want to focus on things that will be meaningful to the community, which is why we’re here.” PLA’s most recent and largest project ever undertaken is the Nimitz Boulevard Median Enhancement. Extending from near West Point Loma Boulevard to the entrance of the Catalina Boulevard on-ramp, that project has replaced barren black asphalt with beautiful softscape succulents, accent boulders and stamped concrete. Coleen Clementson, a San Diego Association of Governments regional transportation planner and Point Loman, gave a slideshow presentation showing how other communities like Bird Rock in La Jolla with its traffic roundabouts, Mission Hills on Washington Street and Chula Vista on Third Avenue have redeveloped their roadway medians to improve their functionality and aesthetics and create a sense of identity. Residents and visioning workshop leaders then broke into small groups to discuss seven different Nimitz segments: North Harbor Drive to Rosecrans, Rosecrans to Lowell, Lowell to Chatsworth, Chatsworth to Wabaska, Wabaska to the Famosa/Catalina Bridge, Famosa/-Catalina Bridge to West Point Loma Boulevard and West Point Loma Boulevard to I-8 and the San Diego River.  Small groups then reported back to the group as a whole with their improvement recommendations. At the end of the workshop, Wear pointed out there are about 15 different funding mechanisms from various sources that could be used over time to pay for Nimitz Boulevard enhancements. “It’s going to be a phased approach, and I’ve found that it’s best to do that in bite-size chunks,” said Wear. “We can do anything we want to do if we have a collective vision.” A workshop participant who identified herself as Guinevere from Ocean Beach, said she was impressed by the meeting and its outcome. “I appreciate that you want to make Nimitz a safer place for bicyclists,” she said. “Nimitz right now is a nightmare to drive. Making Nimitz safer and more beautiful go hand-in-hand. I’m encouraged.”
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    Pointers fired up after 2-game win streak pushes record to 3-1
    by SCOTT HOPKINS
    Sep 24, 2014 | 606 views | 0 0 comments | 9 9 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Point Loma’s Jacob Ehm (No. 24) sprints to the end zone to score a touchdown in the Pointers’ 40-20 victory at Lincoln on Sept. 19. Photos by Scott Hopkins
    Point Loma’s Jacob Ehm (No. 24) sprints to the end zone to score a touchdown in the Pointers’ 40-20 victory at Lincoln on Sept. 19. Photos by Scott Hopkins
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    A group of Point Loma defenders stops a Morse quarterback back on a crucial fourth-down play in the second quarter of their game Sept. 19. Helping stop the Tiger drive are Cameron Callicutt (No. 50), Brenden Torrence (No. 3), Tim O’Brien (No. 80) and Patrick Rutledge (No. 82). 									 Photos by Scott Hopkins
    A group of Point Loma defenders stops a Morse quarterback back on a crucial fourth-down play in the second quarter of their game Sept. 19. Helping stop the Tiger drive are Cameron Callicutt (No. 50), Brenden Torrence (No. 3), Tim O’Brien (No. 80) and Patrick Rutledge (No. 82). Photos by Scott Hopkins
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    The Point Loma Pointers football team upped its season record to 3-1 with a 14-0 victory over CIF Div. III Morse on its home turf Sept. 19. In a non-league encounter, all of the Div. I Pointers’ points came in a span of less than five minutes in the second quarter as both teams were hurt by fumbles on a warm, dry afternoon. With 11:13 left before halftime, Pointer defenders stalled the Tigers on a fourth-down play to gain possession. The stop seemed to energize the Dogs. Jaylen Griffin broke free for a run of more than 50 yards before being forced out of bounds. From there, sophomore Tshombré Carter put his team on the scoreboard with a dash through the Morse defense. Following the kickoff, the Tigers let the pigskin escape once more, and the Pointers recovered with 8:42 left in the second quarter. Again the Pointers marched down the field, with Tim O’Brien’s (6 feet, 7 inches) catch and run resulting in a first down at the Tiger two-yard line. From here, the Morse defense stopped the Pointers on three consecutive runs up the middle before Griffin swept left for the touchdown with 6:38 left before the break. Other than this span, neither team was able to mount a scoring drive, with strong defense and fumbles by both offenses often the culprit. The loss drops Morse to 0-4.  The Pointers head east to Santee on Friday, Sept. 26 for their first visit to Santana High. The Dogs downed the Sultans 35-3 last year at home. Kickoff is slated for 7 p.m. at the Grossmont-Valley League school. The Sultans, also a Div. III team, stand at 2-2 after wins against San Diego Southwest and Kearny. They have lost to Castle Park and Francis Parker.  POINT LOMA 40, LINCOLN 20 The points came quickly and more often for the Pointers Sept. 12 when they traveled to Southeast San Diego to face the Hornets during a recent heat wave. The Dogs clearly learned after seeing Ramona block two of their kick attempts the previous week. On this night, however, the Pointers returned the favor, blocking two early Hornet punt attempts that led to a Jaime Medina field goal and a Gavin Grady touchdown run for a 9-0 lead as the first quarter ended. With second quarter scores on runs by Jacob Ehm and Carter, the Pointers took a 23-12 lead at halftime. A pass from Grady to a leaping Carter in the end zone and another Medina field goal upped the margin to 33-12 after three periods. With numerous Pointer reserves gaining valuable playing time, the Dogs scored yet again. Backup quarterback Brenden Torrence scrambled for yardage on the drive before Sergio Gallegos crossed the goal line for the final Pointer score. EXTRA POINTS • The Pointers are one point away from being undefeated, their lone loss coming in a 7-6 disappointment against powerful Ramona. • The younger Pointer teams also sit at 3-1 after the freshmen (23-6) and junior varsity (15-12) recorded victories against Morse. • Alexandra Van Heuven has taken over as athletic director at PLHS, replacing John Murphy. She is also the school’s head track and field coach, assistant girls’ varsity soccer coach and coordinator of the school’s weight room. • Pointer defensive standout Cole Kidd suffered a concussion at Lincoln when a teammate’s knee struck his head. He was inactive against Morse, but should return Sept. 26 at Santana.
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    Anonymous donation fuels Scripps' plan for ocean-study hardware
    Sep 18, 2014 | 22772 views | 0 0 comments | 8 8 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Big, ugly underwater cameras like these are a step closer to inclusion in the research  arsenal at Scripps Institution of Oceanography. COURTESY PHOTO
    Big, ugly underwater cameras like these are a step closer to inclusion in the research arsenal at Scripps Institution of Oceanography. COURTESY PHOTO
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    An anonymous donor to UCSD's Scripps Institution of Oceanography has committed $500,000 to bring sensor, instrument and platform concepts developed by Scripps scientists to completion, enabling creation of equipment that will allow new types of measurements, detection and extended power capabilities for ocean research. “This generous gift will accelerate our ability to observe and measure the ocean through the development of a new generation of viable research instruments,” said Margaret Leinen, Scripps Oceanography director. “We are grateful for this investment from a donor with the vision to support the transformative research interests of our innovative scientists.” Underwater cameras and microscopes allow scientists to look closely, even in 3-D, at freely floating, minute organisms that drift with water currents. These close-ups provide unprecedented views of critical components of the marine environment. Many federal sources of funding for the projects' instrumentation are focused on developing new instrument concepts – research into instrumentation rather than deployable instruments – making it difficult to secure funding. Meanwhile, Scripps researchers have developed many innovative inventions, such as floats, gliders, cameras, 3-D microscopes, earthquake sensors and pH detectors for ocean acidification. The donor, therefore, sought to support unique equipment development not commercially available or fabricated from off-the-shelf components. Proposal criteria focused on completing new instruments. A rigorous competitive process narrowed the field from 27 proposal submissions and resulted in awards for innovation and invention to three Scripps research teams: Making Spectrophotometric Seawater pH Measurements Convenient, Andrew Dickson, professor of marine chemistry, Scripps Marine Physical Laboratory With increasing levels of carbon dioxide accumulating in the atmosphere and dissolving into seawater, the world's oceans are becoming more acidic. The Dickson laboratory provides reference samples of seawater that are used to ensure worldwide uniformity in measurements of these changes. An automated system that can efficiently make reliable and precise measurements of the pH of seawater samples is critical to the study of ocean acidification. Dickson has a prototype precision pH measuring system that uses a spectrophotometric approach to measure the color of a pH indicator dye. With this funding, he and his team will optimize the existing system to produce a system more compact and better suited for widespread laboratory use. Scripps Plankton Camera System, Jules Jaffe, research oceanographer, Scripps Marine Physical Laboratory Jaffe is the innovator of new technology for observing oceanic phenomena and the development of inverse techniques for their interpretation. Funds will enable complete development of the Scripps Plankton Camera System (a prototype dark field zooplankton microscope system initiated under separate funding) and support its operation for at least one year. This new funding will also support the addition of a higher-resolution phytoplankton imaging system. The installation will consist of two in situ dark field microscopes with compact computers performing realtime image processing and object detection. Output from these microscopes will be broadcast to the Internet, where scientists, students and the public can explore and tag data from the system with realtime access. C-Gen: Power Generation for Remote Oceanographic Instruments from Ambient Ocean Currents, Drew Lucas,Matthew Alford, Michael Goldin, and Robert Pinkel, Scripps Marine Physical Laboratory With this gift, the Scripps science team will construct an electrical power generator that uses the energy of ocean currents to provide power for individual oceanographic sensors. Generating 1 to 10 watts from a compact, simple device will address a modern, practical oceanographic challenge: the power limitation of long-term oceanographic observations. The project will deploy the generator in a “clip-on” mode, where it attaches to a conventional sensor package and continually recharges sensor batteries. Alternatively, it can be deployed within a moored string of instruments to power clusters of sensors or along optical fiber communications lines to enable the transfer of data from remote instruments back to shore. – Staff and contribution
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    News
    Flying high again
    The Navy’s Blue Angels are again on the docket for the 2014 Miramar Air Show, the country's largest military air show, after beng grounded last year amid federal budget sequestration and a 16-day g...
    Oct 01, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Sports
    COLLEGE ROUNDUP: PLNU triumphs in golf, hits cold streak in volleyball
    FULLER TAKES TITLE AT PLNU FALL PREVIEW Haley Fuller did not shy away from the opportunity that awaited her entering the final round of the Point Loma Nazarene University Fall Preview at Torrey Pin...
    Sep 24, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Opinion
    GUEST VIEW: End of an era for Ob barber still a happy sunset story
    This isn’t a sad story because there are two happy endings. But it starts with a bit of nostalgia for an Ocean Beach that is no more. First was the pet store on Cable Street and Newport Avenue. The...
    Sep 24, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Arts & Entertainment
    Local musicians will get their due at the SD Music Awards
    The 24th annual San Diego Music Awards is set to take center stage Oct. 6 at Humphreys Concerts by the Bay. While the event is open to the public, for local musicians it’s the social event of the y...
    Sep 24, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Business
    Bali Hai slates Polynesian blowout in honor of its 60th anniversary
    One of Point Loma’s high-profile restaurants and an iconic destination for locals and visitors alike, the Bali Hai Restaurant on Shelter Island will host a 60th Anniversary Celebration on Thursday,...
    Sep 24, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 93 93 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Obituaries
    James Fielding Vaughan, aka ‘Von Ton the Atom Bomb’ of Pacific Beach, 85
    James “Jim” Fielding Vaughan, 85, of Pacific Beach, passed away at home on Sept. 12. A celebration of life will be held at 3 p.m. on Friday, Oct. 10 at Mission Point Park.   “Von Ton the Atom Bomb”...
    Oct 01, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend
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