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    Strong women tackle Alzheimer's on the gridiron
    by THOMAS MELVILLE
    Feb 10, 2016 | 2652 views | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Lisa Kondrat (and behind her from left), Michelle Anderson, Jocelyn Fielding and Amanda Ruedas celebrate a Green team touchdown. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Lisa Kondrat (and behind her from left), Michelle Anderson, Jocelyn Fielding and Amanda Ruedas celebrate a Green team touchdown. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    Green team defenders Michelle Le and Cristina Kelly tackle Pink team RB Autumn Sutterlin. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Green team defenders Michelle Le and Cristina Kelly tackle Pink team RB Autumn Sutterlin. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    Green's Colleen Stoyas drops a pass as Pink's Autumn Sutterlin and Maia Albano give chase. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Green's Colleen Stoyas drops a pass as Pink's Autumn Sutterlin and Maia Albano give chase. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    Cristina Kelly tackles Pink's Lauren Hoffmaster during the first half. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Cristina Kelly tackles Pink's Lauren Hoffmaster during the first half. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    Kat Shaw fires up her Pink teammates at half time of the TackleALZ game. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Kat Shaw fires up her Pink teammates at half time of the TackleALZ game. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    Green's Ali Nicastro runs through Pink's Eileen Johnson, Maia Albano and Alyce Fernebok for a second half touchdown. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    Green's Ali Nicastro runs through Pink's Eileen Johnson, Maia Albano and Alyce Fernebok for a second half touchdown. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    On the Saturday before Super Bowl Sunday, blondes and brunettes – and even a redhead or two – came together to tackle, tussle and take part in trying to defeat Alzheimer's disease. TackleALZ (formerly Blondes vs. Brunettes) is a volunteer-led female flag football game that raises money for Alzheimer’s San Diego. The event, partnered with Vavi Sport & Social Club, with assistance from Old Mission Bay Athletic Club, played out at the Little Q rugby field next to Qualcomm Stadium with the Green team (Brunettes) beating the Pink squad (Blondes) in a rout, 31-12. But the real winner is Alzheimer’s San Diego, which will receive more than $56,000 raised by players and fans at the annual event. "The TackleALZ San Diego game was an incredible testament to the local dedication and commitment these women have shown over the last year,” said Mary Ball, president and CEO of Alzheimer's San Diego. “Not only did they play their hearts out on game day, but together they raised more than $56,000 to support San Diego families facing Alzheimer's disease and advance local research for a cure.” For more information on TackleALZ and Alzheimer's San Diego, visit http://www.alzsd.org.
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    Are tiny homes the solution to homelessness?
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Feb 09, 2016 | 6450 views | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Rev. Dr. Simon Mainwaring, rector of St. Andrews by-the-Sea Episcopal Church in Pacific Beach, and Christopher Scott, who's designed and built his own version of a “tiny” home, have teamed to popularize the concept. / Photo by Dave Schwab
    Rev. Dr. Simon Mainwaring, rector of St. Andrews by-the-Sea Episcopal Church in Pacific Beach, and Christopher Scott, who's designed and built his own version of a “tiny” home, have teamed to popularize the concept. / Photo by Dave Schwab
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    A Pacific Beach inventor and a church rector are promoting one conceivable solution to the intractable problem of homelessness: IKEA-like tiny, build-it-yourself homes. Rev. Dr. Simon Mainwaring, rector of St. Andrews by-the-Sea Episcopal Church in Pacific Beach, and Christopher Scott, who's designed and built his own version of a “tiny” home, have teamed to popularize the concept. They're calling it “the start of a real solution to San Diego's homelessness problem.” “A kit for these 400-plus square-foot homes can be purchased for $500 or $600 and can be assembled in two or three hours with screwdrivers and without power tools,” said Scott, a forestry specialist who said he helped start IKEA, a Scandinavian chain selling ready-to-assemble furniture, in North America. “The concept I hope may work in PB is that a jobless person can start off with one of these little houses, make improvements to it, make it look pretty, and resell it and build some equity for their next step up.” Mainwaring, among five local PB church leaders who've banded together since November of 2015 to form the Pacific Beach Homeless Coalition, said Scott's creative solution to finding the homeless homes is way of stimulating “thinking about homelessness and potential solutions. “We are looking at this as a way of sparking the imagination,” said Mainwaring, who discussed the tiny homes concept. “That's the key, providing someone with a roof over their head in a location that provides stability and security, in their own little home where they can even close and lock the door, keeping them safely inside.” Once housed, an individual can then reboot his or her life, beginning the process of finding a job and re-establishing himself as a contributing member of society, Mainwaring said. One of Scott's tiny home models is presently on view in St. Andrews sanctuary at 1050 Thomas Ave., across the street from Pacific Beach library. The tiny homes, which resemble children's playhouses in design and appearance, are large enough for a medium-size person to stretch out or even stand in. “The whole country is seeded with people who are trying to approach it (homeless housing),” Scott said. Seattle has opened 14 tiny homes. A Nashville church has built six. The tiny homes are said to offer these advantages: • They provide better shelters than tarps or tents. • The homeless can build them themselves. • Wasted building materials can be collected to make the tiny homes, which adds an element of sustainability to them. • Often, tiny homes can be grown to make them a more permanent form of housing. • They're extremely cost effective. Tiny homes will be on the agenda of the next Pacific Beach Homeless Coalition meeting, to which the public is invited on Wednesday, Feb. 17 from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the Community Room of Pacific Beach Taylor Library, 4275 Cass St. “It's a group meeting between neighbors, the homeless and other interested parties,” said Mainwaring, noting the format is mostly informal. “It's a chance for people to build relationships, offer feedback,” he said. Mainwaring said the next step in the process of paving the way for the homes to become a reality is to “get neighborhood buy-in on the concept before working up a comprehensive proposal to bring to the city, then have an informed discussion.” Obviously places would have to be found, and in some cases zoning changed, to make tiny homes legal. “It's a challenging solution to what is a profoundly challenging life to lead on the street,” noted Scott, who added that dialogue about homeless housing “is a great conversation to have.” Scott pointed out that tiny homes are trending. “It's a solution being considered across the country and, frankly, the world,” he said, adding, “If we can put a man on the moon, we can find a solution for this.”
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    Mothers and daughters in harmony for charity at MADCAPS show
    by SCOTT HOPKINS
    Feb 03, 2016 | 31554 views | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Members of MADCAPS rehearse musical numbers for the group's 56th annual music and dance show Thursday through Saturday, March 10 to 12, at Point Loma Nazarene University. Tickets for the popular performances go on sale Feb. 9.
    Members of MADCAPS rehearse musical numbers for the group's 56th annual music and dance show Thursday through Saturday, March 10 to 12, at Point Loma Nazarene University. Tickets for the popular performances go on sale Feb. 9.
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    One of the community's oldest organizations is preparing to stage its annual music and dance review involving a cast of hundreds of local teens. This is the 56th year that MADCAPS (Mothers and Daughters Club Assisting Philanthropies) has entertained audiences while raising funds for charities selected by the young ladies themselves. Months of rehearsals will culminate in "MADCAPS, in Harmony with San Diego," the theme of this year's show, to be staged Thursday through Saturday, March 10 to 12, at Brown Chapel on the campus of Point Loma Nazarene University. Dozens of local young men are also featured in the production. Tickets for the popular show, which features singing, several types of dance and a farewell to graduating members, will go on sale Tuesday, Feb. 9, and range from $5 to $25 each. They can be purchased at sdmadcaps.org. "We are particularly excited about this year's theme," said Kate McKenzie, 2016 benefit communications chair of the group. "It focuses on our local community, where our boots are on the ground making a difference. An exciting new feature of the show is stage appearances by representatives of the philanthropies we support. This year, we are very pleased to welcome San Diego Habitat for Humanity, St. Vincent de Paul and San Diego Therapeutic Recreational Services to say a few words to our patrons." MADCAPS is also supporting an outreach to homeless kids led by PLNU and San Diego First Church by collecting items for kits to be distributed to those in need. Patrons are asked to bring items such as tube socks and small shampoo bottles. Community sponsors this year include Meguiar's Inc., Erin and Jim Schabarum, the Brick Youth Group of Point Loma Community Presbyterian Church and the MADCAPS Class of 2016. MADCAPS is a group of about 180 mothers and their daughters in grades 7 through 12 who live in the Point Loma, Ocean Beach, Mission Hills and Hillcrest areas. They provide direct services and donations to many area charitable organizations. Each year's new class selects charities to assist as they grow, contributing thousands of volunteer hours each year. Since its inception in 1960, the group has raised more than $828,000 in addition to the invaluable volunteer services of its members. All MADCAPS members also volunteer annually at the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer 3-Day Walk and Autism Speaks. More information is available at the group website above or by contacting McKenzie at (619) 399-9839 or kate.mckenzie@cox.net.
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    El Niño takes a crack at Sunset Cliffs
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Feb 03, 2016 | 1800 views | 1 1 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Large cracks have opened up at Sunset Cliffs near PNLU. Signs at Sunset Cliffs urge visitors to keep off unstable areas of the park. Photo by Jim Grant
    Large cracks have opened up at Sunset Cliffs near PNLU. Signs at Sunset Cliffs urge visitors to keep off unstable areas of the park. Photo by Jim Grant
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    Sunset Cliffs is on (a) crack. So much so that part of the Ocean Beach landform, which developed a sizable split beneath Point Loma Nazarene University during the last storm event, could come tumbling down. Perhaps soon, according to Prof. Pat Abbott. “The crack literally is wide enough to stick your arm in — if you dare,” said Abbott, a San Diego State University geology professor emeritus and author of a bestselling textbook, “Natural Disasters,” published by McGraw-Hill. “It looks to me like the crack is widening.” Noting cliff erosion is a natural process and that one of the forces at work, gravity, is “pulling every minute, every day,” Abbott said it's not a question of whether the cracked cliff section will one day fall but when. “It could happen any day of any year,” he said, asking, “At what instance does gravity win? A lot of times, it is not predictable. If we get a real good rainstorm that gets into that crack and causes it to open up a little bit more, it could put it past the point of no return.” Abbott noted ocean waves constantly pounding the cliffs, and especially high tides during the winter season and storm surges, factor into ongoing erosion of oceanside cliffs. Will there be any advance warning when the university cliff face gives way? “More than likely it will just fall without warning,” Abbott said. “When gravity is tired of pulling, it will be game over.” Sunset Cliffs, which straddles the Ocean Beach and Point Loma areas, is composed of two different landforms, according to Abbott. The geologist described the lower-level rock as “hard sandstone about 76 million years old,” adding, “It's compacted and cemented together.” “That older rock formed about 3,000 feet deep in the ocean is part of the uplift of the Peninsula caused by the Rose Canyon fault system,” Abbott said, adding that the upper, newer level of rock is much more loosely compacted and therefore much more susceptible to erosion. Concerning the potential threat of the cliff below the university falling, Abbott said that is a very real possibility, though he added, “The beach below PLNU is not heavily used, only used by surfers,” whom he said “might be walking under that cliff when it goes,” in which case, he added, “It would be a fatality. There is a fatality every few years.” The geology professor noted that it is extremely difficult, if not impossible, to predict when an eroding landform, like the cliff at the university, will finally give way, though he noted the current El Niño may have something to do with that. “We expect some really big storms with big waves the next couple of months,” he said. “So there's a chance we'll have some cliff failures. It's the same every day. The odds may be higher, though, of this occurring during this couple-month period.”
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    JamaZon
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    February 04, 2016
    I'd really like to see where this fault runs on a map! Is it only the cliffs, or is it the whole peninsula that is crumbling?
    Mission Bay jetty tower lost in storm
    Feb 02, 2016 | 5897 views | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    The Mission Bay channel  tower was ripped off the north jetty by huge waves during the Jan. 31 storm. / Photo by Jim Grant
    The Mission Bay channel tower was ripped off the north jetty by huge waves during the Jan. 31 storm. / Photo by Jim Grant
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    The 42-foot Mission Bay channel entrance marker tower was ripped off the north jetty by huge waves during the Jan. 31 storm. The tower, which had a navigational light, fog horn, and weather station on it, will need to be replaced by the Coast Guard. / Photo by Jim Grant
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    News
    Residents hear update on De Anza Revitalization Plan
    Residents were updated Jan. 28 at a community workshop on the De Anza Revitalization Plan, a reimagining of what Mission Bay Park's approximately 4,000 acres of beaches, parklands, picnic areas, ma...
    Feb 09, 2016 | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Sports
    Sea Lions win PLNU Reach 2016 Tournament
    The record setting season for the Point Loma women's golf team continued on Tuesday when it captured the title of PLNU Reach 2016 held at the Riverwalk Golf Course by 14 strokes with a score of 620...
    Feb 09, 2016 | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Opinion
    SD housing: Know the risks before selecting a roommate
    One of the best ways for renters to find a good deal in San Diego is to share an apartment or house with roommates instead of living alone. Whereas a typical one-bedroom apartment may cost $1,050, ...
    Feb 08, 2016 | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Arts & Entertainment
    Rio Report: Brazilians love to party at Réveillon and Carnival
    (Joseph Capp is a long time Pacific Beach resident who has lived part-time in Rio de Janeiro for the last five years. He will be sharing news and updates from Rio with sdnews.com readers through th...
    Feb 09, 2016 | 0 0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Business
    Earn your wings: Point Lomans open indoor skydiving wind tunnel adventure
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    Feb 08, 2016 | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Obituaries
    Charles S. (Chip) Cox, 93, Scripps ocean study pioneer
    Charles Shipley Cox, a professor emeritus at UCSD's Scripps Institution of Oceanography, died of cancer on Nov. 30 at his home in Del Mar. He was 93. Cox pioneered research in two fields – the elec...
    Dec 04, 2015 | 0 0 comments | 15 15 recommendations | email to a friend
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