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    Visual aesthetics earn Point Loma residence an architectural award
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    May 29, 2015 | 818 views | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    The house in Point Loma was honored with a win at The Just Imagine Awards recognizing designers who create designs using LuciteLux.
    The house in Point Loma was honored with a win at The Just Imagine Awards recognizing designers who create designs using LuciteLux.
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    You’ve heard of the better mousetrap. Well, now there’s a better plastics application. And it’s been used so successfully in residential development in Point Loma, that it has garnered an industry Just Imagine design award. The eye-catching “Louvers by Design” project, made with LuciteLux Frost in Glacier Green cast acrylic, is a residential property collaboration project by Elliott Rabin of ePlastics of Kearny Mesa and Jeff Kull Construction. The joint project was completed in early 2014. Michael Sebastian, ePlastics online marketing director, discussed the dilemma resolved by the new plastics application. “We used this Lucite plastic application for some (window) louvers because the residents wanted to be able to block the sun but also wanted to get an ocean view out of the windows,” Sebastian said. “So it (windows) were constructed to block the sun on the lower level, but not on the upper level.” Sebastian said the resulting customized plastics application has “added to the visual aesthetics of the home.” Architectural plans in the Point Loma home called for window louvers that would diffuse natural light coming into the two-story living room while allowing people on the second floor to have a clear view of the Pacific Ocean. Kull turned to ePlastics to identify a material that would not only accomplish that objective but also be strong, durable and able to withstand varying temperatures and all kinds of weather, particularly in its relatively exposed position at the top of the house. ePlastics introduced Kull to LuciteLux Frost in Glacier Green, and the rest is design history. “‘Louvers by Design is a breathtaking example of taking a traditionally functional feature – in this case the louver – and making it a major part of the home’s overall aesthetic,” said Chris Robinson, business manager for Lucite International. “We’re delighted that the duo behind the project selected one of our most versatile product offerings, LuciteLux Frost, to realize their creative vision. Its cool, frosted surface resists scratches and retains its texture when designers form it into all kinds of shapes and sizes.” “We selected LuciteLux Frost because of its opacity level and color, which blended with the ocean beautifully,” said Rabin. “The home’s decorators had a very intentional theme and color scheme. The LuciteLux cast acrylic was a perfect match.” Rabin added that the product was also selected for the housing project because of its thermoformability, which allowed it to be heated and wrapped around an aluminum frame in a controlled and uniform manner, avoiding the risk of kinking or cracking. The Louvers by Design project was honored recently with a win at The Just Imagine Awards recognizing designers who embrace the originality of working with and creating designs using LuciteLux. The Just Imagine award recognizes a designer’s achievement in the field, and celebrates their distinctive contribution to the world of design using LucieLux’s cast acrylic material. As the winner of the Just Imagine Awards 2014, ePlastics will receive a high-profile promotional campaign that includes a full-page spread in Architectural Record, a feature on popular blog Design Milk, and a ‘making of’ documentary-style video about their work and artistic vision.
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    Point Loma teams earn three league titles in spring sports
    by SCOTT HOPKINS
    May 28, 2015 | 683 views | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    The Pointer took the Central League championship with a 6-4 record (11-8 overall).
    The Pointer took the Central League championship with a 6-4 record (11-8 overall).
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    Swimmer Max Adler, foreground, helped lead his Point Loma High School team to an undefeated season and Eastern League championship. / Photo by Holly Harris
    Swimmer Max Adler, foreground, helped lead his Point Loma High School team to an undefeated season and Eastern League championship. / Photo by Holly Harris
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    Athletes at Point Loma High School brought home three league championships and barely missed another during a very successful spring showing. Boys swimming For a boys swimming team that does not have any divers, Point Loma High's second straight undefeated season and league championship is even more remarkable. The Pointers automatically forfeit each meet's diving points to their opponents, so it must compensate by its performance in the swimming events. And still, the water Dogs floated to the top of the Eastern League standings on the strength of a tense battle against Serra High that came down to the 400-meter freestyle relay. Leading 84-72, the Pointer team of Kealan Harris, Miles Koupal, Brendan McMahon and Chase Schaffer finished first, while teammates Joe McCannon, Sam McKay, Noah Stevenson and Trent Webster took second to secure the league title. All eight qualified for the City Conference meet in addition to Max Adler, Michael Damsky, Jackson Daubner, Caleb Hareb, Naone Hasenstab, Kyle Miller, Erik Robinson, Kaynin Vaughn, Adam Watson and Sean Webster. Harris recorded the fastest times in five of eight events to lead the team. The team's coaches include Joshua Fulks, Ken Toma, Jeromy Schultheiss and Jerry Rich. Track and field Nine Pointer athletes earned Eastern League championships: Courtney Justus (long jump and triple jump); Hallie Pullum (800 meters); Samantha Coon (pole vault); Jason Baker (long jump); Antonio Quintanilla, Jeese O'Brien, Malik Riddle and Jaylen Griffin (4 x 100-meter relay) and Ki'arah Johnson (100 meter and 200 meter). Others qualifying for the CIF meet were Ginger Jacobs (long jump and triple jump); Allison Detrick (triple jump and 100-meter hurdles); Dan O'Beirne (shot put); Micah Karahadian (pole vault and 4 x 400 meter); Rowan Griffiths (pole vault); Isabella Polese (triple jump); Griffin (100 meters, 200 meters and 4 x 400 meters); Malik Riddle (4 x 400 meters); Antonio Quintanilla (4 x 400 meters) and Hiwalani Sierra (discus). Keith DeLong (boys) and Alex Van Heuven (girls) split Pointer head coaching duties. Boys lacrosse The team took the Central League championship with a 6-4 record (11-8 overall). Sophomore William Price led the team in scoring with 29 goals and eight assists for 37 points. Classmate Jerry Piotrowski was second with 17 goals and seven assists for 24 points. Senior Cole Scadden played every game in goal and posted a 5.1 goals against average for the Pointers. In a first-round Div. II CIF playoff game, the No. 5-seeded Pointers were defeated 8-1 by No. 12-seeded Del Norte, which was winless in the Palomar League and 5-12 overall. Pointer head coach Alex Golland and staff are looking forward to a more experienced squad in the future from a roster made up of four juniors, 13 sophomores and eight freshmen. Only four seniors will leave. Boys tennis Head coach Mark Truver's Pointers scored another league championship, finishing 11-1 in Eastern League, then went all the way to the CIF Div. I semifinals before dropping their match against La Jolla Country Day. Following team competition, individuals continued on to earn further recognition. Sophomore Keegan Smith won the Eastern League singles title after teammate Ivan Thamma, also a sophomore, was forced to withdraw with an injury. Earlier, the two, playing doubles, reached the finals of the prestigious 115th annual Ojai Invitational tournament. Thamma, the No. 3 seed in CIF singles, went to the semifinals before dropping his match to top-seeded Billy Rowe of Coronado in a marathon 6-4, 4-6, 10-8 match. Freshman Colton O'Connell and sophomore Alex Schuster, playing in the CIF Doubles tournament, won two matches before losing to a pair of La Jolla High players in the "round of 16." Other sports - Boys volleyball just missed an Eastern League title, finishing 10-2 (18-13 overall), just behind 11-1 Patrick Henry. Henry's only league loss was dealt by the Pointers in a memorable 3-1 match last month in the Pointer gym. But Henry downed the Pointers twice in earlier season matches on the Patriots' floor. - Boys golf won its first seven matches en route to a 10-3 record. - Girls softball finished 7-5 (13-14 overall), good for third place in the Western League. They dropped a 7-1 decision to Ranch Bernardo in the first round of CIF Div. I playoffs. - Girls swimming dropped to 1-6 in league and 2-8 overall. Several members qualified for the conference meet. They include Ella Bouris, Teresa Grippo, Miranda Morrison, Lauren Olcott, Hejira Whittaker, Jade Zounes, Lyric Greif and Erica Myrmel. - Girls lacrosse was winless in Western League and 2-16 overall. All but five players should return next Spring from a roster that includes seven juniors, four sophomores and eight freshmen.
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    Apple Tree Market may sprout again in Ocean Beach
    by ANTHONY de GARATE
    May 28, 2015 | 983 views | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Though most people call it the old Bank of America, this building at 4976 Newport Ave. has more recently been the site of a Gold’s Gym, OB Surf & Skate and Rock Paper Scissors. Owner Saad Hirmez hopes to open Apple Tree Market here sometime this year. / Photo by Anthony de Garate
    Though most people call it the old Bank of America, this building at 4976 Newport Ave. has more recently been the site of a Gold’s Gym, OB Surf & Skate and Rock Paper Scissors. Owner Saad Hirmez hopes to open Apple Tree Market here sometime this year. / Photo by Anthony de Garate
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    Before the building at 4949 Santa Monica Ave. opened as a CVS Pharmacy this year, Apple Tree Market reigned there as Ocean Beach’s only full-time grocery store. That distinction ended in late 2013 when, after a quarter century, the business lost its lease. Saad Hirmez, who took over the former Safeway in 1989 and didn’t want to leave, has been counting the days until he opens a new store – literally. “It’s been two years, five months and seven days since we were kicked to the curb against our will,” Hirmez said May 6 at the monthly meeting of the Ocean Beach Planning Board. If Hirmez sounds bitter about Apple Tree’s demise, he’s equally optimistic about its return. He appeared with preliminary floor plans for a new Apple Tree at the former Bank of America building at 4976 Newport Ave., just a few blocks from the previous location. “We’ve missed the community; we’ve missed doing business here. We’re very excited to come back with a beautiful state-of-the-art building to serve the community,” he said. It won’t happen as soon as he’d like – he originally envisioned a July 4 opening – but Hirmez said he’s making enough progress on obtaining the necessary permits to open “sometime this year.” Hirmez said he bought the building in 2001, when he began to have “issues” with his then-landlord, Elliot Megdal, a Los Angeles-based Realtor. The building, most recently the home of Rock Paper Scissors, has been vacant for several years. The small size of the building will require some adjustments. There won’t be room for detergents, beauty products and other items typically found at a grocery store, Hirmez said. Furthermore, “There’s no reason for it” with the proximity of two drug stores – CVS and Rite-Aid. But shoppers who expect and prefer natural foods will not be disappointed, Hirmez said. At least 40 percent of foodstuffs will be organic. “We know the community wants this,” he said. As for alcohol, Hirmez said police have approved the transfer of his license from the former location to sell beer, wine and spirits – though final approval from the state Alcoholic Beverage Control Department is pending. To gain police support, Hirmez said he agreed to several conditions, including: no single cans of beer, no half-pints or miniature bottles of spirits, no fortified wines and no sales after midnight. No protests were filed when Hirmez applied for alcohol at the new location – in stark contrast to the contentiousness that erupted when CVS applied for a liquor license at the old Apple Tree location, Hirmez noted. He said it’s a tribute to the solid reputation and goodwill he earned at the previous location. “Zero protests (to a liquor license application) are absolutely unheard of in a beach community. That’s a testament to the community and our neighbors that they want their store back,” he said “Our intention has never been to run a liquor store. Our intention is to run a grocery store,” he added. New board members Nancy Kelley (District 2) and Georgia Sparkman (District 7) have been appointed to fill two of the four vacancies on the board. Kelley described herself as a retired vocational rehabilitation counselor and teacher and OB resident since 1971. She mentioned sustainability and climate change as a few of her interests and said she’s eager to dive into the fine points of community planning. Sparkman, a 35-year resident, holds a master’s in city planning from San Diego State University and recently retired from the city after nearly three decades as a city planner. Her career at the city began in 1986 as a community planner for Ocean Beach. Citizens seeking appointment to one of the remaining two slots on the board must be at least 18 and live, own property or run a business in the Ocean Beach Community Planning Area. They must also gather 35 signatures in the district they wish to represent. More information is available at oceanbeachplanning.org. Crosswalks on Newport Avenue? Stop signs and crosswalks could be coming to two corners near the foot of Newport Avenue – one of the most heavily traveled areas in Ocean Beach. The city has “evaluated and approved” a four-way stop sign at the Ocean Beach lifeguard station at the corner of Abbott Street and Santa Monica Avenue, Chairman John Ambert said. More stop signs have been similarly endorsed one block south at Abbott Street and Newport Avenue. There’s no word on when the improvements may be installed, but city officials have told the board some $20,000 was available for pedestrian enhancements in Ocean Beach, Ambert said. Ambert has identified five areas of need and has pitched his ideas at recent board meetings and on social media. People’s Co-Op expansion plans Preliminary plans for an organic juice bar and cafe with residential units on top at the site of the former Tiny’s Tavern, 4745 Voltaire St., could be released in as little as a month. That’s from Jim Kase, store manager at Ocean Beach People’s Food Co-Op, which purchased the property early this year. Discussions are under way with the architect Hanna Gabriel Wells, and the Co-op is eager to get public feedback on the design, Kase said. The proposal will likely call for demolishing Tiny’s, which is actually three buildings cobbled together and not up to code; and the adjacent duplex, he said. The Co-op’s current parking lot would be expanded, and the multi-use building would be constructed on the east side.
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    Summer fun with Bianca – Playing at Dog Beach in Ocean Beach and then a bath for Shila
    by BIANCA WEINSTEIN
    May 23, 2015 | 27593 views | 0 0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Bianca and Shila at the Dog Beach in Ocean Beach.
    Bianca and Shila at the Dog Beach in Ocean Beach.
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    Bianca and Shila at Dog Beach Dog Wash in Ocean Beach.
    Bianca and Shila at Dog Beach Dog Wash in Ocean Beach.
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    Shila getting a bath from Bianca at Dog Beach Dog Wash in Ocean Beach.
    Shila getting a bath from Bianca at Dog Beach Dog Wash in Ocean Beach.
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    Bianca and Shila play at Ocean Beach's Dog Beach.
    Bianca and Shila play at Ocean Beach's Dog Beach.
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    Shila meets some friends at the Dog Beach.
    Shila meets some friends at the Dog Beach.
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    The other day, I was playing with my boxer Shila, and I thought it would be a great idea to take her to Ocean Beach's Dog Beach. I packed up the car and headed out to let her run around and play. Dog Beach is an off-leash beach located at the north end of Ocean Beach, and it is the only 24-hour dog beach in the San Diego area. Before we even got out of the car, Shila was already excited and wagging her little tail. Once her paws hit the sand, Shila was off running around, meeting the other dogs. She became instant friends with some golden retrievers and was having the time of her life running and chasing a ball into the water. After meeting all the friendly dogs, Shila was worn out and ready to take a nap. Before Shila could go home, I took her to Dog Beach Dog Wash to give her a bath. The dog wash is open seven days a week from 7 a.m. to 9 p.m., with the last dog wash 30 minutes prior to closing. The dog wash includes warm water, shampoo, a grooming mitt, washcloths, an apron, towels and a brush, all for just $14. For an additional $2.50, you can use a specialty shampoo, such as hypoallergenic, flea and tick (pyrethrin or neem), coat brightening (black, bronze or whitener), moisturizing shampoo and a few more choices depending on your dog's needs. If you want your dog's coat conditioned, you can use conditioners such as aloe vera, chamomile and oatmeal for an additional $2.50 and aloe remoisturizer for $3.50. After considering the shampoo choices and conditioners, I opted for the regular dog wash and began bathing Shila with the shampoo provided with the wash. Though she is a little baby when it comes to bath time, she was feeling much softer and looking very clean afterward. Dog Beach Dog Wash also offers other services for after the bath, such as a $3.50 blow dry or fluff-box dry, grooming table/Clipper-Vac ($5 per every 15 minutes) and nail trimming for $13. There are also toys and treats available for purchase in the store ranging from $1 up. Remember to always pick up after your pet and to keep Dog Beach clean. Dog Beach Dog Wash Where: 4933 Voltaire St. Contact: (619) 523-1700 or dogwash.com
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    Surfrider chair discusses San Diego chapter's role in maintaining beaches and bays
    by THOMAS MELVILLE
    May 20, 2015 | 12352 views | 0 0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Surfrider Foundation San Diego County Chapter chair Mark West says, “That’s why we’re here.”
    Surfrider Foundation San Diego County Chapter chair Mark West says, “That’s why we’re here.”
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    About two weeks ago on the deck at Paradise Point Resort, just as the sun started to set over Mission Bay, Surfrider Foundation San Diego County Chapter chair Mark West looked over his right shoulder to see the golden hour glow growing. “See that? That's what it's all about,” he said, as he waved his arms toward the bay. “That's why we're here.” “Here” was at the Surfrider Foundation San Diego County Chapter’s 15th annual Art Gala, which raised $34,000 to help protect the region's coastline and directly benefit the organization’s education, outreach and advocacy directed at protecting local beaches. The event, which was held Friday, May 8, celebrated ocean advocacy while showcasing local artists and raising funds. “It was a thrill to see so many enthusiastic activists and supporters gathered for the event,” said new San Diego Chapter manager Mandy Sackett. While the activists and supporters bid on artwork, nibbled on orange chicken and drank Stone IPA, West was working the room making and re-establishing connections for the nonprofit. Right before sunset, the Beach & Bay Press caught up with him to discuss Surfrider and the role it plays in maintaining the area's coastal areas. BBP: How would you describe the Surfrider Foundation? Mark West: I would say that the Surfrider Foundation is all about making sure that each person can go to the beach, enjoy their day at the beach, spend their time in the ocean, spend their time in the waves, and have a great experience. This is a California treasure that so many people take for granted, but we don’t. We work to protect our oceans, waves, and beaches so everyone can use them. BBP: Why is the Surfrider Foundation important? MW: Our mission is to protect the ocean, waves, and beaches through a powerful activist network. What we do is we actually take all people who are passionate about our ocean, our beaches, our bays, and get together and really work toward cleaning them up, preventing pollution from getting into them. We even do stuff like ocean-friendly gardens where we’re thinking about the drought and how we can plant ocean-friendly gardens out there that are really California specific; they require no water, and they actually have less run-off as well. BBP: What does Surfrider do for the bays? MW: This bay (Mission Bay) has beaches all around it. We actually hold clean-ups right here in Mission Bay that are cleaning the beaches of litter before it gets into the bay. This is a large ecosystem that flows into our ocean, and if we can clean it here, then it cleans it out in our ocean, and we’ve worked really hard to make sure that we are removing pollution from this area. BBP: Do some people think Surfrider is just about surfers? MW: It’s funny, I don’t think people know that this is more than just surfers. I was a 24-year U.S. naval officer before I became the chair of Surfrider. We have all different kinds of people who are working for this because we are all very passionate about our ocean, waves, and beaches. It’s a group effort. I’ve got moms. I’ve got hipsters. I’ve got people who are all really into this group, and it’s all about people. BBP: How many members in the San Diego chapter? MW: We have about 5,000 active members, but in our email distribution list we have about 10,000 activists who are applying or involved in some form or another. Not everyone is cleaning the beaches. We have some doing web development. We have some people designing T-shirts. Everybody who has something that they’re passionate about, oceans, waves, and beaches, can come out and play a particular role in it. You don’t have to clean the beaches. Do other things. It’s all for the same good. BBP: What is the annual art gala? MW: The 15th annual art gala at Paradise Point in Mission Bay was a fantastic event. This event is our largest fundraiser that we have each year, so it’s really our biggest event that we hold, and we get all the people from all over San Diego to come out and talk about Surfrider. BBP: The funds you raise go where? MW: Right back into the protection of oceans, waves, and beaches. Every penny that we have goes right back into it. We do have a staff of two people, which for this group is nothing, but we have to make sure that we pay for the T-shirts, that we get the beach clean-up supplies. We have all these different things. This event really drives our entire year budget. So that’s why it’s so important for people come and help us out. BBP: Surfrider holds clean-ups and also has a specific program about getting the “butt” out? MW: We do beach clean-ups. San Diego is one of the largest chapters in Surfrider. We have 70 miles of beaches, which stretch from the border all the way up to San Clemente. Believe it or not, that’s part of our group. We take care of those 70 miles with programs such as “rise above plastics,” which is trying to reduce plastic that gets washed onto your beaches and carried to our beaches; and we have our “hold onto our butts” program. Cigarette butt pollution is the largest polluter of our beaches in our entire world. We get rid of those, we recycle them and turn them into money. BBP: How do you turn it (cigarette butts) into money? MW: There’s actually a company, out of Maryland, that is recycling the butts, and they either take them and turn them into furniture or certain things, and then they actually pay per pound. It’s not a ton of money, but they’re actually turning it into profits we can market back to our mission. BBP: What are some of the organizations Surfrider partners with? MW: We partner with a lot of local organizations including Wild Out Coast, which is down in the Imperial Beach area. We work with them on our No Border Sewage campaign, which is eliminating transborder pollution that is flowing from Mexico into our Imperial Beach area. We work with San Diego Coastkeeper, in fact the waterkeeper at Coastkeepers is on the board at Surfrider San Diego. So we have people all over that are in different organizations. We’re with I Love a Clean San Diego. A multitude of organizations. Really, it’s all about having people, all working toward a central goal. BBP: And that central goal is? MW: Protection of the ocean, waves, and beaches. BBP: What has Surfrider done to make a beachgoers experience more special? MW: Let me tell you about a story. Imperial Beac, where I live. In the 1970s one of the first real environment success stories of San Diego Surfrider happened. There was a proposal to build a mile long jetty at Imperial Beach. Literally rocks all the way down. We worked through our local governments to make sure that didn’t happen. I mean they were really taking the rocks out there. The majority of people, you go to the beach, you're just a normal ocean goer, we're protecting that by cleaning the beaches constantly. We have a huge network of people who go out and really work toward cleaning those beaches. So, you can take it for granted, but were gonna take care of it for you anyway. For more information, visit sandiego.surfrider.org or contact Chapter manager Mandy Sackett at mandy@surfridersd.org or (440) 749-6845.
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    News
    SeaWorld aiding 11 mammals affected by Santa Barbara oil spill
    SeaWorld San Diego reported May 27 that its specialists are taking care of 11 sea lions and six elephant seals affected by last week’s oil pipeline rupture near Santa Barbara after receiving two mo...
    May 29, 2015 | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Sports
    Point Loma sophomore wins CIF singles tennis championship
    Point Loma High School sophomore Keegan Smith fought through a rain-delayed three-hour match last Friday, May 22, at the local Barnes Tennis Center to defeat top-seeded Billy Rowe of Coronado and w...
    May 28, 2015 | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Opinion
    Midway area in need of a revitalized BID 
    Calling all community servants. There’s an urgent need to “rekindle” an effort begun more than a year ago to reconstitute and revitalize a Business Improvement District (BID) for the Midway area. T...
    May 28, 2015 | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Arts & Entertainment
    Madonna coming to Valley View in Point Loma
    Madonna will make a stop in San Diego on her worldwide Rebel Heart tour this fall. The Material Girl is scheduled to perform at the Valley View Casino Center in Point Loma on Oct. 29. General publi...
    May 26, 2015 | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Business
    San Diego’s microbrew industry featured on KPBS
    A new series documenting San Diego’s microbrew industry will debut Thursday, May 21 on KPBS. “Kings of the Craft” will introduce audiences to the unique people and businesses of the San Diego craft...
    May 21, 2015 | 0 0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Obituaries
    Hats off to civic icon Esther Viti, 1932-2015
    Esther Viti, La Jolla’s “Hat Lady,” was impossible to miss. The chapeau-clad, wheelchair-bound Viti was omnipresent in the Jewel. She hosted community clean-ups and attended civic functions. She to...
    Apr 23, 2015 | 0 0 comments | 9 9 recommendations | email to a friend
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