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    InSync reduces travel times on Rosecrans in Midway District
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Mar 28, 2017 | 2401 views | 1 1 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    The Rosecrans Adaptive Traffic Control System is meant to “decrease gas consumption and decrease greenhouse gas emissions, all part of the city's Climate Action Plan.” That plan aims to satisfy state mandates for reducing greenhouse gases by 20 percent below 1990 levels by 2020, 40 percent by 2030 and 80 percent by 2050.
    The Rosecrans Adaptive Traffic Control System is meant to “decrease gas consumption and decrease greenhouse gas emissions, all part of the city's Climate Action Plan.” That plan aims to satisfy state mandates for reducing greenhouse gases by 20 percent below 1990 levels by 2020, 40 percent by 2030 and 80 percent by 2050.
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    A new automated traffic-signal optimization system on Point Loma's Rosecrans Street was officially dedicated March 24 by Mayor Kevin Faulconer and Peninsula leaders. Faulconer said the city's “made a concentrated push in the last few years to use techology to become a smarter city trying to use that technology to provide better service to customers and to our residents. … Now we're using technology to improve traffic.” The mayor noted the new signals “communicate with each other, memorize traffic patterns and make timing adjustments so cars keep moving along rather than sitting at a red light for minutes on end.” The new system “is all about taking real-time data, and turning it into real-time results,” said Faulconer. “Since the new signals were installed, we've seen travel times reduced by as much as 25 percent during rush hour,” the mayor added. “We've also seen the number of stops at these traffic signals decrease by as much as 53 percent, depending on the signal. We have residents and commuters who travel this corridor every day — and they've definitely noticed an improvement.” District 2 Councilmember Lorie Zapf described Rosecrans prior to the InSync traffic optimization system as “the core triangle of traffic hell.” “I never knew how long it would take,” Zapf said adding installation of the new lights was a “quality of life issue.” “This is the largest traffic signalization project in the city, and this has been a big team effort,” she concluded. Jon Linney, chair of Peninsula Community Planning Board, and Clark Anthony, president of the Point Loma Association, chimed in on the new traffic-signal system's importance. Linney referred to the new Rosecrans adapted traffic singals as a “blessing and relief” and a “major advance in taming the traffic nightmare.”Anthony said he was tired of “sitting at stoplights watching minutes tick by at empty intersections.” He pointed out the new “intuitive and innovative (traffic) system will save us time, fuel and frustration — and that's important.” Anthony concluded that “the sheer volume of traffic at both ends of Rosecrans is something we're going to have to continue to address over the years. But this is certainly a step in the right direction.” Asked whether the new traffic signal optimization system has made a difference, Peninsulans answered yes. “Rosecrans seems to flow much nicer,” said PLA board member Robert Tripp Jackson adding, “We need these at Sunset Cliffs and Voltaire/W. Point Loma. That area always backs up between those two blocks.” “I think the system works well and seems to effectively alleviate some unnecessary stops along Rosecrans,” concurred Cecilia Carrick, also of the PLA. Peter Nystrom, chair of the Peninsula Community Planning Board's Traffic and Transportation Subcommittee, noted there are 11 signal lights on Rosecrans between Nimitz and Interstate 5. “I have never been able to travel north and rarely south without at least one 'red' light stopping my progress,” said Nystrom. “With the establishment of the system for Rosecrans, as long as the traffic keeps up, I always make the trip with all 'green lights.' I don’t know what effect the system has on cross streets, or whether the system is applicable for other locations, but it is perfect for Rosecrans.” The InSync traffic optimization system installed on Rosecrans mirrors a similar traffic-optimization system installed recently on Torrey Pines Road on La Jolla Parkway. Seeking to combat worsening traffic congestion, city officials have created a $163 million master plan to install, over a 10-year period, modern stoplight timing systems and other advanced technologies that ease gridlock. The 10-year plan is intended to connect each of the city's 1,540 stoplights into a timing and coordination network controlled by a central hub. The Rosecrans Adaptive Traffic Control System is meant to “decrease gas consumption and decrease greenhouse gas emissions, all part of the city's Climate Action Plan.” That plan aims to satisfy state mandates for reducing greenhouse gases by 20 percent below 1990 levels by 2020, 40 percent by 2030 and 80 percent by 2050.
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    TaraG
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    March 28, 2017
    The traffic does flow much better. I drive this area daily. Now if someone could just fix the pot holes, that would be great!
    Opinion: What can bayside communities do about rising sea levels?
    Mar 28, 2017 | 5091 views | 0 0 comments | 13 13 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    A blue heron in Mission Bay. / Photo by Thomas Melville
    A blue heron in Mission Bay. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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    Communities with coastal management programs in place may feel they are ready for whatever sea level change may throw at them (within reason). Should the level rise, they can adapt by increasing the height of the beach and dunes to compensate for both higher tides and stronger storms. But for those communities who are on islands or barrier beaches or bays, what about the non-beach side? Is it ready for any rise in tides? What other vulnerable areas need to be looked at? It does you no good to have a high-and-dry beachfront if your mainland access is under water. Communities around the country are facing the very real sea level change impacts already, as flooding that once was rare now becomes far too common. Often, these calamities make themselves felt on the non-beachfront side first, in a variety of subtle ways that can easily sneak up on you due to their slow progression. How will you know there’s a problem – and what (if anything) can be done? - Flooding: First and foremost, increased flooding (in both depth and frequency) is a dead giveaway that sea level is on the rise. Often the first indication there is a problem is that streets inundated more frequently, by waterfront properties complaining that their lawns are being attacked by seawater, and by seeing flood levels creeping higher and higher are clear warning signs. What can you do? Elevate, of course, buildings, roadways, you name it; improve drainage in low-lying areas (assuming your drainage is not being similarly affected); even consider ways to create either barriers or distance on the non-beach side between high water lines and upland structures or infrastructure using wetlands, vegetation or other soft or hard structures. - Septic systems: If your community still relies on these systems for wastewater treatment, changes in sea level that push the groundwater levels higher will soon have an impact on their effectiveness. Most septic systems rely on drainfields to treat waste and must have significant separation (24 inches, as a rule) from the underlying groundwater. If those drainfields are inundated or holding tanks are sitting in ground water, you have a problem. What can you do? Nothing cheaply… moving to so-called performance systems (which clean wastewater above ground before releasing it into the ground) are pricey and take a lot of work to keep them running effectively. The alternative may be a move to sanitary sewer, which is a major public works effort requiring both time and money aplenty. - Potable or irrigation water: Wells also feel an impact from rising ground water, either through salt water intrusion or increased pressure on the freshwater “lens” or aquifer your wells are accessing. What can you do? Move away from relying on wells or expect to install desalination devices on them. If you’re not on a central water system now, you will be soon… and either looking for a purer source or figuring out your options to remove the salt. That may also push your community toward a re-use or “gray water” system, to avoid having to use increasingly expensive potable water for irrigation. - Stormwater management and drainage: If levels are higher and storms are stronger, your community will need to be able to hold back higher levels or water… or retain more stormwater before needing to drain it immediately away. And if some of your current drainage outfalls are starting to go under water, their ability to work when needed will be increasingly compromised. What can you do? Higher berms for retention or to forestall flooding, move outfalls higher and install one-way gates so water goes out but will not be drawn back in. - Non-beachfront barriers: Holding back any rising tides on the bay side will take either barriers or buffers (as noted above). But you’ll also need to look at what’s already in place to see if they’ll be able to stand up to higher water levels. What can you do? If you’re using seawalls, they may need to be modified to both go higher and to avoid failure through overtopping or undercutting. And hard structures may need to be replaced with “living” shorelines, which create both a better buffer and give you the ability to move them further inland as waters push them there. - Natural vs. human resources: An island is finite and, as waters around it rise, there’s less land to go around. Prized coastal ecosystems that rely on a delicate mix of conditions – especially between fresh and salt water – will be squeezed… hard. What can you do? It will be necessary for your community to eventually make some tough choices to balance natural and human needs… and these will not be just environmental choices but economic ones, should rising water levels start pushing costs equally higher. It’s better to start that conversation sooner, before options are limited and change is imminent. Some coastal experts may quibble about how much sea level is likely to change, but no one ever says there won’t be change. So coastal professionals charged with keeping their communities safe and prepared for any pending sea level change must look at all the potential vulnerabilities in order to be effective at their jobs. In many communities, the most vulnerable points may be far away from the sandy beach – and the solutions may be both complicated and costly to implement. This makes it even more imperative that your community begin the planning process now. Developing a management plan will be even more critical in years to come. That’s why understanding these pressure points for sea level change is crucial, and having a clear-eyed assessment of vulnerability and timeframe is essential. Founded in 1926, the American Shore and Beach Preservation Association (ASBPA) is a nonprofit that advocates for healthy coastlines by promoting the integration of science, policies and actions that maintain, protect and enhance the coasts of America. For more information on ASBPA, go to www.asbpa.org.
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    America's Schooner Cup returns to San Diego in April
    Mar 22, 2017 | 22246 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    America's Schooner Cup 2016 winner Lively leads Rose of Sharon into San Diego Bay. / Photo by Cynthia Sinclair
    America's Schooner Cup 2016 winner Lively leads Rose of Sharon into San Diego Bay. / Photo by Cynthia Sinclair
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    Historic ships from throughout the country’s history will be showing off in San Diego Bay for the 29th running of America's Schooner Cup on Saturday, April 1. Hailing from Southern California and the Pacific Northwest, more than 12 schooners are expected to take the starting gun. The schooners range in length from 35 to 150 feet. Spectators may watch the start and finish off Shelter Island. No registration is necessary for those viewing from Shelter Island. Spectators should arrive at 11:15 a.m. Three groups of schooners will each start between 11:30 and noon. The race runs from Shelter Island, out of the bay and back and typically takes 2-3 hours. For those who want to be part of the action, three vessels will be taking a limited number of guests: - Californian – California's official state Tall Ship – a great option for those who want to participate in the race – sdmaritime.org; - Bill of Rights – a 136-foot replica of a 19th century coastal schooner – another lively option for those who want to participate in the race – schoonerbillofrights.com; - San Salvador – a replica of Juan Cabrillo's ship that first visited San Diego in 1542 – a fun option for spectators – sdmaritime.org. The race is hosted by Silver Gate Yacht Club, with all proceeds going to the Navy/Marine Corps Relief Society – a nonprofit whose mission is to help Navy and Marine families. The event will be supported by Star Clippers, a worldwide cruise ship company featuring tall ships.
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    Status of short-term vacation rentals in limbo
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Mar 20, 2017 | 14796 views | 2 2 comments | 30 30 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    The city's Smart Growth and Land Use Committee is scheduled to take up the vacation rental issue again March 24.
    The city's Smart Growth and Land Use Committee is scheduled to take up the vacation rental issue again March 24.
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    The tide in the battle by beach residents seeking to restrict – or exclude – short-term vacation rentals in single-family neighborhoods may have turned with an about-face at the city attorney's office. Immediate past City Attorney Jan Goldsmith had maintained rules and regulations governing short-term vacation rentals were vague and needed clarification. New City Attorney Mara Elliott has taken a completely different tack with her March 15 issuance of a memorandum of law advising the City Council on the housing issue. "The city has a ‘permissive zoning ordinance,’” said Elliott's memorandum. “This means that any use that is not listed in the city's zoning ordinance is prohibited.” Elliott's memo subsequently pointed out, “Short-term vacation rentals are not specifically defined, expressly permitted, or listed in any of the zone use categories, including residential or commercial." The city attorney's memo came at a key time, just before the city's Smart Growth and Land Use Committee is scheduled to take up the vacation rental issue again March 24. Last November, following five hours of public testimony, a motion by then-City Council President Sherri Lightner, which some feel would have largely banned short-term vacation rentals in single-family neighborhoods, was defeated by a 7-2 vote. Lightner’s proposal would have restricted a homeowner's ability to rent to transients for less than 30 days in most single-family zones, with renters or owners of single-family homes also not able to rent out a room or space for less than seven days without proper permitting. An alternative motion brought by then-Councilmember, now-Assemblyman Todd Gloria was subsequently passed in November by the same 7-2 margin. His counter motion requested city staff do a fiscal analysis to determine the cost of greater stvr enforcement citywide, asked staff to draft and return with a comprehensive ordinance better defining and regulating short-term vacation rentals, as well as remanding the matter back to the City Council's Smart Growth and Land Use Committee for further consideration. Reacting to Elliott's pronouncement, 1st District Councilmember Barbary Bry said: "I was pleased to read the memo issued by City Attorney Mara Elliott confirming that short-term vacation rentals do not fall under any permissible use in the municipal code and are therefore prohibited in the city of San Diego. I look forward to working with my colleagues on the council to determine the best way to allow property owners to participate in home sharing.” Pacific Beach resident Ronan Gray, a spokesperson for Save San Diego Neighborhoods, a grassroots group opposed to short-term vacation rentals in single-family neighborhoods, called Elliott's comment a “game changer” in beginning to address noise, trash and other recurrent problems with short-term rentals. “Suddenly, these mini hotels that have been popping up are now illegal,” Gray said. “We bought our homes expecting to be living in residential, not commercial areas. This type of use is clearly commercial.” Gray added: “When you turn a home into a hotel – nobody wants to live there, it's just a constant stream of strangers and tourists. That's not what our neighborhoods are for.” Gary Wonacott, president of Mission Beach Town Council, located in an area where large numbers of short-term vacation rentals are present, said the beach community has taken a centrist approach to dealing with the issue. “While the MBTC membership has, on multiple occasions, expressed concern for the increase in the number of short-term rentals in Mission Beach in the past decade, and has voted for a minimum number of days allowed for a short-term rental, the Mission Beach community has historically embraced vacation rentals,” Wonacott said. “It is now a matter of working with the city to ensure that the final ordinance implemented by the city incorporates the features in the Mission Beach plan that tailor the requirements to the culture of this unique and special community in San Diego,” Wonacott said.
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    PSJ13
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    March 22, 2017
    I love this part: "the Mission Beach community has historically embraced vacation rentals,” Wonacott said.

    What community? There is no community in Mission Beach. That's the point! It's been taken over by STVRs. I think be "community" Wonacott is referring to the companies and absentee owners who run these former residences - now turned mini-hotels. Take a walk through MB. It's trashed - a shell of a community. A blighted tourist trap that used to be a neighborhood.

    john88
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    March 27, 2017
    that was my thought: who is even on the council? who lives there anymore?
    Point Loma’s robotic team wins regional, heading to world competition
    by SCOTT HOPKINS
    Mar 18, 2017 | 8620 views | 1 1 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Members of the Point Loma robotics team that went undefeated during a three-day competition against winners from 17 states last weekend include back row, left to right: Andrew Trent, JD Schrady, Ethan Cooper, Collin Nilsen, Joe Landon, Konrad Zirkle and Eric Schuster. Front row: Shanon Lee, Hailey Schmidt, Allison Trent and Casey Wilson.
    Members of the Point Loma robotics team that went undefeated during a three-day competition against winners from 17 states last weekend include back row, left to right: Andrew Trent, JD Schrady, Ethan Cooper, Collin Nilsen, Joe Landon, Konrad Zirkle and Eric Schuster. Front row: Shanon Lee, Hailey Schmidt, Allison Trent and Casey Wilson.
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    Residents in the Fleetridge section of Point Loma may have been suspicious after noticing a group of Point Loma High School students entering a home, coming and going regularly on afternoons, weeknights and weekends, some disappearing into the home for hours at a time even when the residents are away. Any neighbors who were concerned can now relax. The students are part of a robotic team and have been working tirelessly for months building a robot. And not just any robot – their electronically powered mechanical creation just won the First Tech Challenge Super Regional event, topping 74 area winning teams from 17 Western states over the three-day event in Tacoma, Wash., that will send the device – and the 11 students who have spent literally thousands of hours preparing it – to a world competition coming up in Houston April 19-22. Team captains are seniors Collin Nilsen and Allison Trent. The team, representing the Point Loma community, actually went undefeated throughout the grueling event, earning the title of "Winning Alliance Captain," which means they were the top-ranked team when choosing other teams to join in alliances for certain portions of the competition. Students in Point Loma have been working on such projects for the last eight years, but this is the first time they have qualified for the super regional, something that required them to finish among the top four of 36 teams at the local level. And work they did. By team mentor Matt Nilsen's calculation, the teens spent over 5,000 hours of time conceiving, building, testing, evaluating, rebuilding and retesting all aspects of the finished robot. A notebook which includes engineering notes and drawings, now runs more than 300 pages. To ensure fair competition, a new common challenge is announced each year. One of the challenges for this year's teams was to construct a robot that could not only recognize the difference between red and blue plastic Wiffle balls, but also scoop them up and shoot them into a raised basket in the middle of the competition area. Another challenge involved picking up large inflatable yoga balls and depositing them atop the same Wiffle ball basket. Robots built must be no larger than an 18-inch cube. Competition takes place in a 12-by-12 foot space with 12-inch high glass walls and interlocking rubber floor mats as a surface. "One of the great things is they give us no plans. Each team starts with nothing and comes up with a unique robot," said Casey Wilson, one of four sophomores on hand to explain the group's project. "There are some definite limitations," said Joe Landon. "Your robot can't shoot the Wiffle balls over a certain height and you have to be conscious and aware of other robots and be spatially aware of the battlefield. There are two teams on the field at once, each with three people, so communication is very important." "For our design process, we try to get inspiration from past designs," said Shanon Lee. "We also make lots of prototypes and this year we've also done some preview modeling of what we think could be a good design. We test our prototypes, and if they work, they go on the robot." With the challenge of shooting Wiffle balls, the group went through much testing. "We've gone through lots of different designs," Lee continued, "and we finally came up with a flexible shooter that can change the angle of the shots so we can shoot from anywhere on the field. We changed many things, but the end product has been worth it." And how are the needed changes made? "The programmer and the builders have to work closely together," said Hailey Schmidt, the team's programmer. "We need to come to an agreement about what will be most effective for each of our specialties. Over time, we've added a lot of new sensors and different ways of approaching the challenge." Some changes involved large amounts of patience during very time-consuming adjustments. "At first, we had a program so the robot could follow a wall by reading how far away it was," Schmidt explained, "but the robot was redesigned and we changed to using a gyro to detect what angle it's facing so it can drive in a straight line." When teams partner up, another set of standards becomes crucial. It's called "gracious professionalism." "On the field," said Wilson, "you want to help each other out. All the teams are friends, so you want to communicate and discuss strategy with them to earn the most points possible." Mentor Nilsen has a mechanical engineering degree from UCSD and works as a battalion chief for San Diego Fire-Rescue Department. He offers gentle suggestions and corrections as the students manipulate and adjust their robot. "My older son was interested in robotics," he said as the students checked the progress of charging batteries on his garage workbench. "When he was in eighth grade and his mentor left, I took the team on. This year's team is special to me, not only having my younger son on the team, but having them all around and seeing how much they enjoy this." Nilsen installed a lock box on his garage and provides keys to all team members, some of whom, such as Lee and Wilson, spend countless hours working even on weekends. The team named their robot "The Rise of Hephaestus" based on the Greek God "who built the first robot," according to Wilson. "The name changed from 'Sons of Hephaestus' when girls returned to the team several years ago." The competition is under the auspices of FIRST, an acronym of For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology, a nonprofit organization that began in 1989 and is based in Manchester, N.H. Today it has grown to include programs for all ages from kindergarten to high school that globally involves over 460,000 students, 52,000 teams, 40,000 robots and 230,000 mentors, coaches, judges and volunteers in 85 countries. Across the world, there are 3,400 teams with 85,000 participants at the grades 9-12 level. The organization also offers $50 million in scholarships to more than 1,500 students.
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    Donna Schmidt
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    March 20, 2017
    Congratulations FTC Team 4216 "Rise of Hephaestus". What a talented and dedicated group of high school students! You have worked tirelessly to advance to the World competition. Wish you the best in Houston!
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