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    Ocean Beach's darker side: an exploration
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Jul 17, 2014 | 15976 views | 1 1 comments | 9 9 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    A police officer restrains an unruly homeless man at the seawall in Ocean Beach. The community is struggling to find a balance between meeting the mental-health and substance-abuse issues of the local homeless and pushing back against unruly and sometimes violent behavior.           Photo by Jim Grant
    A police officer restrains an unruly homeless man at the seawall in Ocean Beach. The community is struggling to find a balance between meeting the mental-health and substance-abuse issues of the local homeless and pushing back against unruly and sometimes violent behavior. Photo by Jim Grant
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    Social-service providers and police officials detailed efforts to curb homelessness in Ocean Beach, while at the same time answering to frustrated residents who feel not enough is being done to solve the problem. Both sides of the issue — including advocacy of the need for services and calls for compassion for human rights and outright ejection of the sometimes harassing and violent homeless squatters — were aired during a public forum hosted by District 2 City Councilman Ed Harris on July 10. Local residents packed the Point Loma/Hervey Branch Library community room to hear from public officials and then give their own takes on the homeless situation, which some feel has gotten out of hand. One woman said she felt like a prisoner in her own home, claiming she’s virtually had to lock herself in to keep out homeless vagrants. Another angry resident half-jokingly suggested the homeless ought to be removed from the area and taken somewhere where their appetites for alcohol and drugs could be appeased without disturbing the community. A local restaurant owner said he might have reconsidered locating his business into the area if he’d known the homeless problem there was so severe. A panel of service providers on hand for the homeless discussion included Kalie Standish, PATH-Connections Housing; Piedad Garcia, county Department of Mental Health; Tom Theisen, Regional Task Force on the Homeless; Milissa Peterman, San Diego Housing Commission; and Sgt. Teresa Clark of the SDPD Homeless Outreach Team (H.O.T.). Standish, associate director of community engagement of People Assisting The Homeless — or PATH — a group of agencies working cooperatively to end homelessness, said putting a roof over street people’s heads is the first step to getting them stabilized and headed back toward leading productive lives. “We’re able to redirect folks,” said Standish of the program, which she said provides an array of services. Standish said there’s been a 70-percent reduction in homelessness in surrounding communities when a comprehensive approach involving wrap-around social services is offered. Meanwhile, Garcia said, “The main challenge for us is to coordinate the efforts of multiple agencies linking the individual with needed services.” Garcia said it’s very difficult to house the homeless because they need to acquire the necessary identification to get the paperwork accomplished, as well as to clean up any legal warrants or financial black marks from their past. Theisen talked about a new homeless pilot program under way currently in downtown San Diego, which he said involves a “coordinated assessment and housing placement program.” That program, Theisen said, involves volunteers who actively count and assess the homeless to categorize them and their needs. Those homeless people can then be dealt with in a much more individualized and focused way once they’re housed and off the streets. Details of the available programs drew responses from community members and local representatives. “You need to take those pilot programs and bring them to our coast,” said Gretchen Kinney Newsom, president of the Ocean Beach Town Council. “We need them right now.” Cathy Kenton, a business owner in the Midway area, said their coastal neighborhood “has become the dumping ground” for homeless people displaced from elsewhere in the city. “Our employees do not feel safe coming and going to work in our neighborhood,” Kenton said. Melanie Nickel, chairwoman of the Midway-Pacific Highway Planning Group, said there are four separate types of homeless in the area: people sleeping on the streets in tents, those living in vehicles, those who take to panhandling on medians and others who lounge in business parking lots. Clark, of the police department’s H.O.T. team, said the key is not only to identify resources for the homeless, but to get the homeless matched up with the appropriate resources. Theisen urged residents to be patient regarding the homeless situation, saying, “There is no magic solution. If you want to solve the problem, you have to put the resources behind it.”
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    johnnytheguitarist
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    July 24, 2014
    biased article that takes no interview from any "homeless" huh. good job at being inaccurate.

    This article spoke about the homeless people of OB as though they were less than human, as though they were all addicted to drugs, that they had no control, and that the majority of them were violent and would harass people. City councillors and shopowners of the area convened and discussed ways in order to deal with the influx of homeless people in the OB area, and the police department have instated a specialized unit that is supposed to be helping homeless people. In reality, these units are there in order to entrap and utilize bullshit laws to make the area as hostile to the homeless as they can. As someone who knows and interacts with the homeless of OB on a daily basis, believe me, they are the least violent people I know. I've seen more violence from locals than I ever have from homeless and travellers.

    I am a local street musician.

    OB is cheap , I only play music sometimes. I dislike dealing with the negative side of peoples very individual judgements and hyper sensitivity because of their jaded social beliefs. have you heard about that fema or jail bullshit happening in the east. if you ask me America is full of nazis and ass holes who care more about their next paycheck over other human beings because they are collectively stressed out because they are stuck in the wage slavery they chose for themselfs because its what seems normal . normal to me is freedom even if i have to starve. i will not pay rent to an already rich chode. i will not work fo the inflated 10 dollar an hour life stealing chode job for a year . i wont file taxes to the shadow government that consistantly allows the violation of the human rights on a regular basis placing economy above sustainabilility for the sake of their on corperate pockets. i dislike any doctor who accepts western "big pharma" medicine as he end all be all when the cure for disease is a proper diet. or the corperate food that supports gmo and toxic chemicals in food calling it healthy.or the big propagandist newspapers writ to divide my countrymen or the economy killeing greedy beastards that buy their amniesty from corrupt politicians. . or not carolinas FEMA concentration camps .these are the reasons i decided to travel. And what you think we are all the same? im pissed this biased crap get the whole story instead of only talking to the enable andrs not of social injustice. is this real news article or just forced propaganda. next time talk to the folks without the money also because i know these people first hand and this article lies AGAINST them. and also all the people you interviewed are known by us to harass us regularly until we are angered with words like "get a job!" and I already said why I wont ever again because im not going to enable the mistreatment of my fellow man by participating in the American "bull****" dream that drains us till we die. w.e know who and why we are and crap like this article just gives us more resolve to stay truly free and trust we are "truly free". mr schwab you should have titled this article' "OB's bias and scandal. trust me when I say young travelers have been murdered in OB by locals before and it was coverd up. but we saw the body with the missing eyes and stab wounds. and this article is a joke.
    Police outreach program plays key role in solution
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Jul 17, 2014 | 933 views | 0 0 comments | 7 7 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Officers monitor activity along Newport Avenue, including those of homeless people who might be causing problems for vacationers, local residents and merchants. Photo by Jim Grant
    Officers monitor activity along Newport Avenue, including those of homeless people who might be causing problems for vacationers, local residents and merchants. Photo by Jim Grant
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    A common complaint by Ocean Beach merchants is drunken homeless people, or those under the influence of drugs, passed out or panhandling outside their businesses along busy Newport Avenue. Some panhandlers are not shy about doing it.                        Photos by Jim Grant
    A common complaint by Ocean Beach merchants is drunken homeless people, or those under the influence of drugs, passed out or panhandling outside their businesses along busy Newport Avenue. Some panhandlers are not shy about doing it. Photos by Jim Grant
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    Police officers are the first line of defense in the Ocean Beach community against criminal activity. Their duties also include dealing with homelessness issues, public drunkenness and finding means to offer the homeless an opportunity to take advantage of programs and services to get them off the street — if vagrants choose to take advantage of such programs.			         Photo by Jim Grant
    Police officers are the first line of defense in the Ocean Beach community against criminal activity. Their duties also include dealing with homelessness issues, public drunkenness and finding means to offer the homeless an opportunity to take advantage of programs and services to get them off the street — if vagrants choose to take advantage of such programs. Photo by Jim Grant
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    The first line of defense in efforts to control homelessness is the San Diego Police Department’s Homeless Outreach Team (H.O.T.). The H.O.T. team consists of police officers, county Health and Human Services Department specialists and psychiatric clinicians from the Psychiatric Emergency Response Team (PERT), a private nonprofit organization. The H.O.T. team is available to assist the community with homeless-related issues. At a recent public forum hosted by District 2 City Councilman Ed Harris on homelessness issues in the Peninsula area, Sgt. Teresa Clark of the H.O,T. team told residents the key to resolving homelessness is not only to identify resources to aid those out on the street, but to get homeless people to seek out those resources. No easy task, said Clark, since people at present cannot be forced to take advantage of available social services. Clark said one objective of the H.O.T. team is “compassionate enforcement.” “It’s hard to grab people up,” said Clark, noting, “You can’t put them all in the jail system — it just can’t handle it.” What H.O.T. team members do, said Clark, is help homeless people to “make connections, pull them off the streets and get them more help.” Describing enforcement as “very challenging,” Clark said one resource available for everyone to tap into immediately is to call 2-1-1. That number is an information hub that connects people with community, health and disaster services through a free, 24/7 confidential phone service and searchable online database. “It’s just like calling 9-1-1,” said Clark, who added the 2-1-1 line allows searches for social services, including everything from substance-abuse treatment to child or elder care, food, housing and financial assistance. By dialing 2-1-1, clients are linked with highly-trained service representatives who can help provide a wide range of immediate resources to individuals and families. A recent survey of about 1,100 homeless people downtown revealed that 62 percent were “chronically homeless,” meaning they’ve lived on the street a year or more. About 14 percent of the homeless population are veterans, and as many as 75 percent of them are classified as having serious mental-health problems. Perhaps surprisingly, surveys have found the largest proportionate group of homeless is in the 50-to-59 age range. Another 12 percent of the homeless population is age 60 or older. Two-thirds of the homeless population is from San Diego or Southern California. A total of 92 percent of homeless people surveyed, when asked if they would move off the street and into transitional housing given the opportunity, said they would accept. On the city’s website, the SDPD and elected officials recognize there is a fine line between homelessness as a social issue and a criminal issue. It is noted that many homeless are on the street because of substance abuse, mental illness, or both. Often the disorder issues associated with homelessness are criminal in nature — but difficult to enforce. Being homeless is also not a crime, although many kinds of public conduct — public intoxication, loitering, prowling, fighting, trespassing, aggressive panhandling, soliciting, urinating and defecating in public, camping or sleeping in parks, littering, obstructing sidewalks, living in a vehicle parked on a public street, disturbing the peace by loud and unreasonable noises, using offensive words, behaving in a threatening manner — are illegal and should be reported to police. At the Midway-Pacific Highway Community Planning Group, which is responsible for the area north of Centre City between Old Town and Point Loma. homelessness is a frequent agenda item and a hot topic. Police Lt. Natalie Stone, who heads a police neighborhood resource team composed of a sergeant and eight officers, said homelessness is “problematic” and a high-profile presence in the Midway Corridor. Noting that the numbers of her Neighborhood Resource Team “aren’t enough to combat the problem,” which she said includes cracking down on illegal encampments and people sleeping in cars, Stone has told community planners that police and the community need to work collaboratively to deal effectively with homelessness. “A lot of the time we rely on your complaints,” she has said. “Call us and we’ll have the Neighborhood Resource Team, city code compliance officers or city neighborhood prosecuting officials to come out and clean up these areas and ask people to move along.” The phone number to call to reach the Police H.O.T. Team is (858) 490-3850.
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    Social-service providers take new tack on problem
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Jul 17, 2014 | 620 views | 0 0 comments | 9 9 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    A common sight on the streets of Ocean  Beach as the community struggles with how best to deal with homelessness issues. Photo by Jim Grant
    A common sight on the streets of Ocean Beach as the community struggles with how best to deal with homelessness issues. Photo by Jim Grant
    slideshow
    Social-service providers have adopted a new approach to combating homelessness that involves first finding them housing, then offering them an array of wrap-around services geared to their needs. That was the perspective offered by a panel of social-service providers who fielded questions from Peninsula residents at a July 10 public forum hosted by District 2 City Councilman Ed Harris. Following the forum, panelists Kalie Standish of Path-Connections Housing, Piedad Garcia of County Mental Health and Tom Theisen of the Regional Task Force on the Homeless spoke about the new direction the war against homelessness is taking. “Homelessness is an extremely complex and complicated issue that affects all of us; the neighboring resident, visitors to our city, area businesses and even the individual who calls the streets their home,” said Standish. Noting “stereotypes and stigmas exist,” Standish said, “One of the best ways to educate citizens in our community is to put a face on the issue and provide solutions that work.” Standish said roughly 8,500 people countywide are homeless, with nearly half (an estimated 75 percent) suffering from serious mental illnesses. “San Diego is home to the largest homeless veteran population in the country,” she said adding, “The marriage between homeless street outreach and housing is critical, as is support from law enforcement.” Garcia said she thought the July 10 homelessness meeting was fruitful as a means of engaging the community. “It’s to be expected that individuals had a very resonant voice and that they were concerned about safety and police issues,” she said. Noting a “housing first model” has been adopted regionwide in addressing homelessness, Garcia said that’s being coupled with support services — substance abuse, mental illness, employment, health care and other components — meant to get people off the street and back into productive lives. “The key is to address the individual needs of the homeless population, which falls into three different groups: those with substance abuse problems, the mentally ill and those who’ve found themselves out on the street due to their economic situation,” Garcia said. “We need to get these individuals anchored and provide assessment of their needs,” she said. Garcia said it’s becoming more widely acknowledged that “the city and county have a duty and responsibility to address homelessness by providing affordable housing.” That, she said, is a challenge in itself because San Diego is among the nation’s most expensive places to live. But with local government, nonprofits and the public all working together, Garcia said she is convinced it will be possible to “put a dent” in the homeless situation. “In the last couple of years, we’ve been able to take 1,100 individuals who were previously homeless off the streets,” said Garcia, who added there’s still a long way to go given the estimated population of 8,000 to 10,000 homeless countywide. “It’s not an easy situation to solve,” she said. “We’re moving forward a step at a time. That may not be as quickly as the community wants.” The community needs to weigh in on homelessness. “We need the community voice to inform us, guide us, on what course to pursue,” Garcia said. Theisen, board president of the Regional Task Force on the Homeless, referred to the 25 Cities Initiative, a national effort to assist 25 communities in accelerating and aligning existing efforts toward ending veteran and chronic homelessness. Theisen spoke of a new pilot homeless pilot program under way right now in downtown San Diego called the Coordinated Assessment and Housing Placement Program. That program surveys the homeless in order to pinpoint their social-service needs. Theisen said the homeless populations runs the gamut. “There are some people who can find their way out of homelessness without any financial intervention, and some with severe disabilities who will never find their way out of homeless without substantial intervention,” Theisen said. Theisen espoused that the objective of the new downtown pilot program is to “assess every individual homeless person to determine what their needs are, then match those individuals to the resources that meet those needs.” Theisen said the goal of the downtown pilot program is to have “taken 250 people off the streets” by mid-September, providing them with housing and services proving the system works. “This is not a test model,” Theisen said. “This is what we’re going to be doing throughout the entire community.” Theisen concluded homelessness can be resolved “if we can figure out the right approach to do it.”
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    ‘Marshmallow War’ tradition softens after community pushback
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Jul 17, 2014 | 559 views | 0 0 comments | 8 8 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    The annual Fourth of July “Marshmallow War” was tamed this year and largely limited to the beach area instead of streets, businesses and Veterans’ Plaza. Police estimated a 90-percent drop in the amount of sticky, gooey marshmallows were used in the fight this year. Photo by Jim Grant
    The annual Fourth of July “Marshmallow War” was tamed this year and largely limited to the beach area instead of streets, businesses and Veterans’ Plaza. Police estimated a 90-percent drop in the amount of sticky, gooey marshmallows were used in the fight this year. Photo by Jim Grant
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    By all accounts, this year’s traditional Fourth of July “Marshmallow War” was a lot less sticky and gooey, thanks to the pre-event “Mallow Out” publicity campaign by the Ocean Beach Town Council (OBTC) and police. “The grassroots effort by the OBTC and the OB community was a huge success,” said San Diego Police Lt. Natalie Stone. “We experienced at least a 90-percent decrease in marshmallows, and there were less arrests and citations.” The assessment was shared by community leaders. “It was a night-and-day difference from last year to this year,” said OBTC president Gretchen Kinney Newsom. The Ocean Beach MainStreet Association (OBMA) also appeared pleased with the outcome. “It was great,” said Denny Knox, executive director of OBMA, the community’s business-improvement district. “There were fewer people throwing [marshmallows] and lots more people picking them up. Most of [the marshmallows] were confined to the sand. Some people just went home.” What began in 1985 as a festive, local family feud morphed over time into a large-scale free-for-all, leaving the beach community a gooey mess that has stained streets, sidewalks and nearby businesses — forcing an army of volunteers to do increasingly costly cleanups. In 2013, the Town Council responded to a public outcry following the Fourth of July “marshmallow war” near the Ocean Beach Pier, which spilled over from the beach into the neighboring business district, leaving streets, businesses and nearby Veterans’ Plaza an unsightly and embarrassing mess. A year later, the OBTC and police officials responded with the “Mallow Out” preventative campaign, aimed at curbing overzealous revelers. The OBTC persuaded at least nine Ocean Beach businesses to refrain from selling the puffy treats to prevent them from being used as weaponry. Additionally, a citizen “Peace Patrol” was assembled to be on the lookout for revelers with marshmallows and gently persuade them to donate their stash to the Girl Scouts. Local residents and businesses were also asked by the OBTC to go online at www.obtowncouncil.org and pledge to end the “marshmallow war” tradition by not throwing the confections or selling accessories like shirts, popguns, slingshots or other items promoting the fight. “We got back to where the event was originally,” said Knox, citing the success of local merchants in “agreeing to remove marshmallows from their shelves or allowing customers to buy just one bag. It was just ridiculous to have to clean the sidewalks two or three times.” Knox said cleanup efforts necessitated by the marshamallow wars were not only a waste of time but a “waste of water during a time when we have a real shortage.” Knox said the “Mallow Out” campaign will continue next year. “We really couldn’t be happier,” she said. Town Council members were similarly pleased with the results of the campaign. “We got the word out with the blitz of media and press conferences,” said Kinney Newsom, adding the beefed-up police presence that followed the annual community fireworks show from the pier “really helped ratchet the war down to about 20 minutes, after which it was time for people to go.” The end result, she said, was that “The streets were clean, Veterans’ Plaza wasn’t a mess.” Kinney Newsom said the anti-marshmallow campaign was a “communitywide effort with everyone working in collaboration with one another.”
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    Faulconer lays cards on table on city’s present, future state
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Jul 17, 2014 | 367 views | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Mayor Kevin Faulconer, right,  holds an open forum with reporters on June 23 to discuss the broad-brush issues and nuances of San Diego’s current state, as well as its future potential and goals. 		                                                                                                                           Photo by Dave Schwab
    Mayor Kevin Faulconer, right, holds an open forum with reporters on June 23 to discuss the broad-brush issues and nuances of San Diego’s current state, as well as its future potential and goals. Photo by Dave Schwab
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    San Diego Mayor Kevin Faulconer discussed everything from the budget, water independence and energy sustainability to fireworks and infrastructural needs during a free-ranging conversation with print media June 23. In his conference room on the 11th floor of City Hall with a commanding view of downtown, Faulconer answered any and all questions. “I’ve tried to really set a tone of collaboration at City Hall,” said Faulconer. “That’s what our city desperately needed. I also think that’s the best way to actually achieve real results.” Noting a combative approach “wasn’t my style,” Faulconer said his term has thus far been focused on the city budget, which he described as the “blueprint for our priorities for the city.” Faulconer, a Point Loma resident, said his budget is all about enhancing neighborhood services and improving infrastructure — paving streets, increasing library hours and other quality-of-life issues. The new mayor said he’s spent a lot of time initially on “economic development, incentivizing the development and growth of new companies, as well as promoting small businesses,” which he characterized as the backbone of San Diego’s economy. Faulconer said he’s working hard to change the culture of city government, striving to make it more “customer-service focused. “Everyone out in our neighborhoods, our taxpayers, they expect and deserve good-quality service coming out of the city,” he said. Faulconer, in office a little more than 100 days, was queried about his stance on the city’s proposed minimum-wage increase. “My job is to make sure we are competitive and provide a good-quality climate, not only for starting new businesses but expanding existing businesses,” he said, noting the state is raising minimum wage from $8 to $10 over time and the question now is whether local entities should independently raise it even more. Faulconer cautioned, however, that raising the minimum wage will cause the opposite of the desired effect, resulting in businesses cutting back or reducing hiring. “What we can’t do is make ourselves less competitive, not create jobs,” he said. “That doesn’t help anybody.” Asked his views on the prospect of greater local control over alcohol-licensing matters, which some in Pacific Beach and other communities along the beachfront are clamoring for because of the oversaturation of bars and entertainment venues, Faulconer said he’s adopted an enforcement posture. “We have to have more enforcement and oversight,” he said, adding newly appointed San Diego Police Chief Shelley Zimmerman agrees that the objective should be “enforcing all of the rules we have with our bars and entertainment in terms of noise and activity, both inside and outside the establishment, especially at night.” Asked about homelessness, Faulconer noted it’s an “acute problem.” He said the focus should be on programs and services that transition people out of homelessness. Citing the Connections Housing Program in downtown San Diego as a workable model, Faulconer said combating homelessness is complicated by the fact that many in the population suffer from the double whammy of substance abuse and mental illness. Nonetheless, “That doesn’t mean we stop trying.” On other topics, Faulconer said the new budget funds a sustainability coordinator for the city, adding San Diego needs to “create the framework that makes us more sustainable.” The mayor said he’s also “100 percent committed” to recycling wastewater, which he said is necessary to attain energy independence for the region. Faulconer said he is pro-fireworks and said he’s willing to work with communities having problems in hosting displays to navigate through the required licensing and permitting processes. Faulconer, a San Diego State University alum, also hailed Padres star Tony Gwynn as not only “Mr. Padre” but “Mr. San Diego. “Most of the coverage of his death, which I think is awesome, was not what he did on the field, but also off of it,” Faulconer said.
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    News
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