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    Summer fun with Bianca @ Cabrillo National Monument
    by BIANCA WEINSTEIN
    Apr 24, 2015 | 11832 views | 0 0 comments | 8 8 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Bianca Weinstein at the whale watch at the Cabrillo National Monument on Point Loma.
    Bianca Weinstein at the whale watch at the Cabrillo National Monument on Point Loma.
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    Bianca Weinstein takes in the view from Cabrillo National Monument.
    Bianca Weinstein takes in the view from Cabrillo National Monument.
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    Bianca Weinstein at the tide pools at Cabrillo National Monument.
    Bianca Weinstein at the tide pools at Cabrillo National Monument.
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    Bianca Weinstein at the entrance to Cabrillo National Monument.
    Bianca Weinstein at the entrance to Cabrillo National Monument.
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    It’s a sunny day in San Diego and I want to go out and explore, so I end up at the Cabrillo National Monument in Point Loma. There are many different things to do – visit the Old Point Loma Lighthouse, marine life at the tide pools, walk along trails that overlook the bayside, watch for gray whales, and visit Juan Rodriguez Cabrillo’s monument that overlooks the San Diego bay. For only a $5 parking fee, you have something to do for the entire day; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. with the exception of the tide pools closing at 4:30 p.m. With so much history in one spot, it’s hard to determine just where to begin my adventures. I started at the tide pools where I watched the waves come crashing against the rocky cliffs. There, I was able to take a look at the ocean's ecosystem that lies along the San Diego coast. During low tide, you’re able to see the creatures of the ocean that get pushed ashore into the rocky depressions. I then ventured along the bayside trails that follow an old U.S. Army roadway through the coastal Mediterranean ecotype. After visiting the tide pools and taking a walk on the bayside trails, I went to view the Old Point Loma Lighthouse where I felt as if I was walking into the mid-1800s. This lighthouse was home to Robert Israel and wife Maria, Cabrillo’s lighthouse keeper for more than 20 years. There’s a narrow spiral staircase that allows you take a look at the different rooms inside, and all the way to the lantern at the top. While I did not see any gray whales during my visit, gray whales pass Point Loma on their yearly round-trip migration of 12,000 miles. During the spring whales head north and then return to Baja California Sur bays in the fall to mate. The best time to view these gray whales is during January and February (but the ocean view is always a pleasurable sight). Finally, I visited the Cabrillo monument, which has one of the best views of San Diego bay and Coronado. Cabrillo was the first European to set food on the West Coast when he came to the Americas in 1510: and it’s no wonder why he chose to settle in San Diego bay; it’s the heart of the town. “Summer Fun” Cabrillo National Monument and tide pools Where: 1800 Cabrillo Memorial Drive Contact: www.nps.gov/cabr or (619) 557-5450 Bianca Weinstein is the social media reporter for sdnews.com. This spring and summer she will be exploring places on the coast and trying out fun things to do for locals and visitors. Contact her at bbp@sdnews.com.
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    Terry's Travels at Ocean Beach Farmers Market
    Apr 23, 2015 | 3296 views | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Ocean Beach Farmers Market.
    Ocean Beach Farmers Market.
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    Local writer, producer, director Terry Wilson is traveling around the coastal areas profiling interesting people, places and events for sdnews.com this year. This week, Terry travels to the Ocean Beach Farmers Market.
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    San Diego and its post-bombing sympathies were well-represented at Boston Marathon
    by TERRI STANLEY
    Apr 21, 2015 | 10969 views | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    San Diego's Eric Marenburg smiles through the pain and the weather as he nears teh finish line at the 119th Boston Marathon. PHOTOS BY TERRI STANLEY
    San Diego's Eric Marenburg smiles through the pain and the weather as he nears teh finish line at the 119th Boston Marathon. PHOTOS BY TERRI STANLEY
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    BOSTON – Boston is coming off its worst winter on record; accordingly, training for the 119th Boston Marathon, run Monday, April 20, had been no small feat for many East Coast runners. But here from the West were several marathoners who trained in some of the best weather in the country. Sunny and warm but not too hot, and with much less humidity, San Diego presents an ideal climate – and with all those miles under their belts, four San Diegans were pretty confident they’d finish the race and hit their time goals (in related matters, San Diegan Meb Keflezighi was unable to defend his 2014 title, and a race to the finish in the women’s division ended with Kenyan Caroline Rotich eking out a win over Ethiopian Mare Dibaba). But this is the Boston Marathon, and anything can happen here, as the world witnessed two years ago. The already storied event has risen to a new prominence since the bombings that led to four deaths and the injuries to hundreds during the race in 2013. And in a twist that rivals that of a novel, the surviving bomber is awaiting sentencing after being convicted of all 30 counts of murder and conspiracy on April 8 in a Boston federal court. San Diego was one of many cities that rallied behind Boston after the tragedy, raising funds and awareness. Events like The Boston Strong San Diego run, organized by Vavi, the San Diego running club (where thousands of runners came out to show their support for The Last Run To Boston, organized by boom RUNNING owner Mike Daly), were commonplace. Jenni Ceglowski, who completed this year's half-marathon at 01.39.38, grew up in Arizona and has been a San Diego transplant for about five years. Her husband got her into running about a year after moving to San Diego as a way to explore, meet people and enjoy the legendary good weather. “It was really incredible to see the community come together here in San Diego after the Boston bombings,” Ceglowski said before the race. “I attended various events and runs, and the sense of support was unreal — just about everyone had a connection to the Boston Marathon. People came together to support their homes, friends and families, remember their pasts, defend their dreams and honor their country in what we did best — run. The Boston Marathon has come to symbolize our strength as a community and as a nation, our ability to stand up and push on, our empathy to reach out and support those around us, our drive, our courage and our determination to put one foot in front of the other even when we are faced with obstacles.” For most of the runners, there are competitive and emotional reasons for running Boston. San Diego has a large running community, and there are many people with ties to Boston. A Road Runner Sports marketing manager who has been running for 20 years, Garrett Sheehan, originally from Kingston, R.I., has lived in San Diego for 10 years. He finished with a time of 03.03.03, remarking that Bostonians “bleed passion for this race, just like they do for their sports teams. “I think people around the world will tell you it’s ‘the’ marathon, the one that you have to do, a box you have to check as a runner,” said Sheehan, 32. “There are amazing runners out here, and the Boston Marathon is a goal for everybody. We’re 3,000 miles away, but for people training for marathons, Boston is on the top of the list.” Sheehan said there is an added importance to running Boston this year. “I qualified last year, and I’ve been training the last six months to get ready for this. I’ve been working my butt off… and with the bomber trial happening, I think all runners took that personally, so I am excited to get out there, be a part of it, embrace it and take it back.” Lauren Padula, finishing at 03.19.54, is a running coach who received a doctorate in physical therapy from Northeastern University and has been living — and training — in the San Diego warmth for the last six years. “I ran Boston in 2007,” Padula said, “and actually went to school at Northeastern. I honestly think that the large number of people who live out here are connected to Boston. So many of us either went to college in Boston or are from the East Coast or have run Boston before, so it really affected us too when the bombings happened. It was on my college bucket list to run Boston. After the bombings, I said I want to run Boston again, I need to run Boston again.” Runners often talk about the electric energy to this race and that it is unlike any other marathon, with the possible exception of the New York City Marathon, that traverses that city every fall. Eric Marenburg, born and raised in Peabody, Mass., can say as much. He's a competitive runner, running cross-country and track and field in high school. He went on to run competitively at the University of Maryland as a walk-on and has completed six marathons, including Boston three times. His personal best was 02:39:53, and he expected to finish this year at about 02:45 – but he had a rough day, struggling with foot pains and the inclement weather as he came in at 03.24. “During the last three miles, when I wanted to walk all the way in,” he said, “I came across a girl in tears as she was chugging along. When I asked what was wrong, all she could say was she was so cold. We understood that runner bond and that we were both struggling but [that] if we can do this together we can finish. Thanks to her, I was able to run all the way to the finish, hurting foot (and hips by that point) and all.” But the race is more than tears and weather and aching bodies. “As a runner,” Marenburg said, “the best thing about Boston is you don’t have to know anyone to be cheered on because it’s such a celebration — you feel like a rock star running down the street, especially Boylston (site of the bombings). In some ways, the Boston experience ruins you, because once you do that, nothing rivals the energy.” He too, cited the added inspiration of running the Boston Marathon this year. “My motivation to be here this year were the events in 2013. It was certainly a huge influence in wanting to qualify so I could get back out there. Since the bombings happened, a lot of the people who are running it this year were motivated by this.” Terri Stanley, former editor of Boston Common magazine, is a writer, television program developer and producer who saw her "styleboston" magazine-format program win two regional Emmy Awards, including in the Outstanding Magazine Program category in 2013.
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    Mission Bay High School opens its 'field of dreams'
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Apr 20, 2015 | 3584 views | 0 0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    With a new regulation field and track, MBHS may now host CIF-level games and the new lights allow for night home games. / Photo by Ronan Gray
    With a new regulation field and track, MBHS may now host CIF-level games and the new lights allow for night home games. / Photo by Ronan Gray
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    MBHS principal Ernie Remillard at the ceremony. / Photo by Dave Schwab
    MBHS principal Ernie Remillard at the ceremony. / Photo by Dave Schwab
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    A new era was ushered in at Mission Bay High School on April 16 as more than 1,400 black-and-gold clad students joined the principal, athletes, alumni, parents and community VIPs in dedicating the school’s new stadium, softball field, upgraded baseball field and athletic facilities. The Navy Color Guard from Naval Medical Center kicked-off the stadium dedication ceremony during which MBHS principal Ernie Remillard commented, “I’m honored to welcome everyone to celebrate the grand opening of the stadium, softball and baseball fields.” As a student athlete himself, Remillard said he’d “never played in a venue as beautiful as what I’m standing in today. “I look forward to seeing the continued success of MBHS athletics and having student athletes of Mission Bay carry on this tradition that has been established by alumni,” Remillard added. Stadium project construction, which started in December 2013 and finished in March 2015, was funded by Proposition Z and State Schools Facilities Funds. It represents an investment of nearly $11 million into Mission Bay High School and the Mission Bay and Pacific Beach communities. The new athletic facilities include raised-level seating for disabled spectators, a safer rubberized running track, and a smooth-surface playing field for a variety of sports for all-year play. With a new regulation field and track, MBHS may now host CIF-level games and the new lights allow for night home games. Pam Deitz, president of the MBHS Alumni Association, noted community volunteers have been working with San Diego Unified School District for more than a decade to acquire new athletic facilities for MBHS. "We started focusing on the MBHS field when my son was starting sixth grade at PBMS,” said Deitz. "He will be graduating from college this June." Major stadium upgrades were needed. "With the new facilities, we no longer have to sell concessions out of a metal storage container," noted Kim Schoettle, president of Friends of Pacific Beach Secondary Schools. "Finally after nearly a decade of SDUSD board of education meetings, phone calls, district visits, emails, letters, countless presentations, and a year of construction, the Mission Bay High School athletic field renovations are complete,” said Kathy Miller Gray. “It is gratifying to know that the work and support of the school community helped bring our ‘field of dreams’ into reality. “We have to thank Lee Dulgeroff and his team at SDUSD for constructing the amazing facilities,” she said. “The deserving students of Mission Bay High School now proudly have athletic facilities that are safe and beautiful." Board Trustee Mike McQuary acknowledged the support of local voters whom, he said, “decided we need (phys ed) facilities and technology improvements” when they “passed a $2 billion bond at 68 percent approval: That’s incredible during a time in which we were (financially) challenged. This community trusted this board and provided the funds to make the difference.” Lee Dulgeroff, chief facilities planning and construction officer of SDUSD, thanked MBHS parents for stepping forward a few years ago in bringing to the school district’s attention that the old stadium, which opened in 1953, was “old and antiquated” and that the track was “in poor shape” while noting its patchy field had been “taken over by gophers.” Dulgeroff pointed out the new-and-improved stadium facility now has bleacher seating for 2,400 spectators — 1,600 on the home side and 800 on the visitors, as well as a new press box, a concession stand and new stadium lights. “It took a lot to make this dream a reality,” Dulgeroff concluded
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    World's oldest cat purr-fectly at home in Point Loma
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Apr 16, 2015 | 3869 views | 0 0 comments | 7 7 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Tiffany Two
    Tiffany Two
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    Retired Point Loma attorney Sharron Voorhees, 73, has owned two tortoiseshell cats named Tiffany. Tiffany One died of cancer after less than a year of ownership. Tiffany Two, whom Voorhees bought years later and named after Tiffany One (whom she strongly resembles), just turned 27 this March 13. That makes Tiffany Two the world’s oldest living cat, the equivalent of more than 125 human years, according to the Guinness Book of World Records. Proud to be the owner of such a prestigious pussy, Voorhees, who also owns two dogs and two other cats, recounted how she first acquired Tiffany Two. “I stopped at a pet shop in Miramar to buy some food,” she explained, “and there was a big sign that said, ‘We’re going out of business at 5 p.m.’ It was 4 p.m. There was this tortoiseshell cat that was almost identical to my first Tiffany, and I thought, ‘I wonder what will happen if nobody buys her.’” Voorhees then drove home, which took about 20 minutes. “I had to turn around,” Voorhees said. “I got back to the pet shop at five minutes to 5 p.m., and I plunked down $10, and that’s how Tiffany came to live with me. That was 27 years ago, and I’ve always said, ‘That’s the best $10 I’ve ever spent.’” Voorhees claims she hasn’t done anything special with her kitty, whom she noted has “eaten Whiskas all her life, mostly the dry, but in recent years, the moist, too.” “She’s a good eater,” added Voorhees. “I had to laugh. She still crunches the dry food, which means her teeth are still good.” Tiffany Two has always been an outdoor cat but is kept indoors now due to her age. But she still gets out, much to Voorhees’ surprise. “She got out about four months ago,” Voorhees said, “and I was desperate to find her, which I did in my next-door neighbor’s yard. She had scaled a six-foot fence. She jumped back over the fence and looked at me like I had lost my mind. I was astonished.” When she learned she was the owner of the world’s oldest known cat, Voorhees' only response was to reply, “I never thought my 15 minutes of fame would come through like that.” Noting Tiffany Two would fit right in at Hogwarts Academy of the Harry Potter book series because her colors are “Halloweeny,” Voorhees noted her elderly cat gets along just fine with her other animals as long as they respect her “space.” “She has her special spot, which right now is the very exact middle of the staircase,” said Voorhees. “She’s the matriarch. The other animals just walk around or jump over her. She’s OK with that.” Voorhees said she feels lucky because both Tiffanys, and all the other cats she’s had, “have all been very affectionate and loving. “I’ve never had a snooty cat,” Voorhees said, adding, “I don’t believe all that stuff about cats being hard to get along with.”
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