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    Woods, Mickelson at the fore in annual Farmers Insurance Open
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Jan 28, 2015 | 1653 views | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    The gallery watches Tiger Woods hit a fairway iron during the 2013 Farmers Insurance Open at Torrey Pines Golf Course.
    The gallery watches Tiger Woods hit a fairway iron during the 2013 Farmers Insurance Open at Torrey Pines Golf Course.
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    Whether or not you’re a golf fan, there are many reasons to go to the annual Farmers Insurance Open, running Thursday through Sunday, Feb. 5 through 8, at iconic Torrey Pines Golf Course in La Jolla. This year, the PGA Farmers tournament will include two of the sport’s biggest luminaries: San Diegan Phil Mickelson, a three-time tournament winner; and Tiger Woods, who has won the tournament six times, including four years in a row (2005-08). The cost to access the tournament ranges from $30 to $200. “Our most powerful impact on San Diego is 20 1/2 hours of live coverage and 31 million U.S. viewers,” said Peter Ripa, CEO of The Century Club, the 501(c)3 nonprofit that stages the annual event and associated festivities. The Open is one of the events circled on the calendar of the La Jolla Village Merchants Association, the Business Improvement District responsible for promoting all things La Jolla. “We have hung the banners for the Farmers Insurance Open up around the Village as our support to the tournament,” said association executive director Sheila Fortune. “We promote the tournament through our social media pages and website calendar. “We will promote our... businesses and their ‘specials’ during the tournament and encourage people attending the tournament to come in to the Village and shop and dine for the evening after play,” continued Fortune. “The local hotels and restaurants are usually booked during this week, and they reach out to those that visit them annually.” Some attractions not to miss for those who go to the Farmers Tourney: • The popular Fringe, an open-air, high-energy sports bar setting located on the 15th green. Perfect to entertain clients, meet up with friends and family and enjoy some conversation, a beverage and up-close views. • The Fan Village, behind the 15th green, adjacent to the 17th fairway and a few hundred feet from the 18th tee, the epicenter of action at the Farmers Insurance Open. • Fan Village Expo, a fan-friendly exposition where guests can try the latest golf equipment, learn more about vacation packages and more. • The Grove, a popular outdoor space where fans can relax and enjoy upgraded and expanded concessions, like the Grey Goose Lounge, Beringer Wine Bar and the Michelob Ultra Build-A-Bar, or catch some golf action in the bleachers on the par-3 8th hole. The tournament originally was noted for having singer-actor Andy Williams as a celebrity host from 1968 to 1988. It started as the San Diego Open in 1952 and went by that name through 1985. Title sponsors were added in 1981, with Farmers coming aboard in 2010. The event is organized by the The Century Club of San Diego. For more information, visit FarmersInsuranceOpen.com.
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    Schoolyard Dash highlights All-Schools Fair
    Jan 28, 2015 | 3829 views | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Participants start the 1-mile kids run as part of the Friends of Pacific Beach Schools Schoolyard Dash at DeAnza Cove, Mission Bay on Sunday.
    Participants start the 1-mile kids run as part of the Friends of Pacific Beach Schools Schoolyard Dash at DeAnza Cove, Mission Bay on Sunday.
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    The Mission Bay Cluster held its All-Schools Fair and Schoolyard Dash 5K on Sunday, Jan. 25, at De Anza Cove at Mission Bay. The Schoolyard Dash 5K Run kicked off the morning full of fun activities with information booths, student bands and presentations from the schools. The second annual event drew more than 450 participants and raised funds for Friends of Pacific Beach Secondary Schools, which supports programs at Pacific Beach Middle School and Mission Bay High School. "We began this event so that the entire community could join in, interact and have fun together,” said Kim Schoettle. “We had been holding auctions for many years prior to this event and decided that we needed to begin something new and different to energize our volunteers and bring the community together. “This year we added the Mission Bay Cluster schools to the event so it involved thousands of students and their families." Schoolyard Dash 5K place-winners in all age groups include: Elementary School boys: Harold Gildehaus, Jacob Adler, Henry Gildehaus. Elementary School girls: Alexa Gibson, Lauren Pelot, Sydney Piquilloud. Middle School boys: Nicholas David Arch, Miguel Ayala Ochoa, Ian Briski. Middle School girls: Cecilia Almazon, Mariana Merlos, Songa Cayetano. High School men’s: Jason Watts, Chris Varela, Tosh Knight. High School women’s: Arianna Linley, Priscilla Tamborini, Katie Baker. Adult men: Andrew Bruck, Brian Wigley, Ernie Remillard. Adult Women: Margaret Ditchburn, Michelle Mead, Alice Kim. All results are available online at www.schoolyarddash.org. The All-Schools Fair presented all of the public schools in the Mission Bay Cluster. Barnard Asian Language Academy, Pacific Beach Elementary, Crown Point Junior Music Academy, Kate Sessions Elementary, Pacific Beach Middle School, and Mission Bay High School. Sponsors included Schoettle Financial, Ocean Park Inn, Brown & Winters, Nightingale Music, The Patio Restaurant, Broken Yolk, Bird Rock Coffee, High Performance Movement, YMCA, and Movin Shoes. Woodstock's Pizza held a pre-race carbo-load dinner and auction the night before with 25 percent of sales going back to the schools.
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    PB street musician to celebrate his 1,001st performance in Gangsta style
    by DAVE SCHWAB
    Jan 28, 2015 | 363 views | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    Taco and his new buddy Gangsta go for a ride.
    Taco and his new buddy Gangsta go for a ride.
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    Street musician Sam Schildkraut and his sidekick, Yorkie-Chihuahua (YoWaWa) mix Gangsta, will celebrate their 1,001st performance outside Skechers shoes at 4475 Mission Blvd. from 9 to 11 p.m. on Monday, Feb. 9. “We’ll both be dressed in our tuxes,” said Schildkraut of the special occasion. It’s been a year since the unlikely pair was first featured in the Beach & Bay Press. Both remain active, vital and increasingly familiar in their adopted beach community. Sam has gained notoriety for playing his sax while accompanied by Gangsta. And Gangsta is making friends, like his new buddy “Taco,” whom he hangs out with now whenever Taco’s owner Doug DePrima drops by. DePrima said Taco and Gangsta are “homies.” “They go wild for each other,” DePrima said, adding the two pet owners and their charges met at McDonald’s and have been friends ever since. DePrima gives kudos to Schildkraut for spending time with and promoting his “sidekick.” “Sam takes Gangsta to L.A. to take pictures with movie stars; he’s very busy with him,” DePrima said. DePrima hopes some of Gangsta’s “street cred” will rub off on Taco. In fact, some of it already has. “Taco does a dance on his hind legs that makes people laugh. That would make me rich if I were able to get him to do it on command,” said DePrima. “He’s the kind of dog who walks down the boardwalk and people just crack a smile when they see him.” A transplant from New York, Schildkraut came to San Diego to pursue his dream of becoming an actor. He’d always wanted a dog. He found one in Gangsta, a “furry frankfurter” he encountered while in a San Bernardino hotel parking lot and ultimately adopted after finding out he was a stray. Though strangers in a strange land, the man and his “son,” as Schildkraut refers to Gangsta, have found their niche in PB performing nightly outside the corner shoe store. It’s an experience that’s schooled Schildkraut on the human condition. The saxophone player said he’s witnessed the good, the bad and the ugly in people standing on the corner of Garnet Avenue and Mission Boulevard. “People will tip you or chat with you even if they can’t tip — that’s all good,” Schildkraut said. “But then I’ve had people, men and women, who’ve shoved me or wanted to throw their weight around or looked down at me.” Earning his living as a street musician has not dissuaded Schildkraut from his ultimate goals, which not only includes personal improvement and success but gaining notoriety for Gangsta as well. Schildkraut wants to pen a book about Gangsta, in a format yet to be determined, with the title “Gangsta: A three-pound puppy lost in the ‘hood.” With a Gangsta tome in the works, Schildkraut is forging ahead with his Gangsta “calendars,” which feature the mutt mugging with more than 100 famous folks, including the likes of astronaut Buzz Aldrin as well as actors like Sylvester Stallone, Cheech Marin and Barbara Eden of “I Dream of Jeannie” fame. Schildkraut is also looking forward to celebrating his 1,001st night as a street saxophone player. “If people have ever appreciated my work, hopefully they’ll come by and say hi,” he said.
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    Volunteers count the homeless in Pacific Beach
    by THOMAS MELVILLE
    Jan 28, 2015 | 888 views | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    In Mission Beach, a makeshift shelter is spotted near the Green Flash sculpture.
    In Mission Beach, a makeshift shelter is spotted near the Green Flash sculpture.
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    Cold, dark, and early. On Thomas Avenue, the lights are glowing at Pacific Beach United Methodist Church and nearly 40 people, bundled up in sweatshirts, hats and scarves, are huddled around Imelda McClendon in the community room. McClendon, the senior project analyst with the Regional Task Force on the Homeless, gives out last minute instructions and maps to the volunteers. It’s 3:30 a.m. and, everyone is a little bleary eyed, but eager to get moving. “Make sure to mark on the map where you see a person, but do not approach them,” she says. “We’re looking for unsheltered homeless this morning.” On Friday, Jan. 23, the Regional Task Force on the Homeless collaborated with local community groups throughout San Diego County to conduct the annual Point-in-Time Homeless Count, known as WeAllCount. According to McClendon, the count enables the region to better understand the scope, impact and potential solutions to homelessness, and empowers the community to qualify for funding that is essential to addressing the issue. At about 3:45 a.m., the volunteers pair up, take their maps, and head out to count the homeless. Marina Baroff, 60, who lives in La Jolla, and Courtney Hammett, 27, from Ocean Beach, receive the boardwalk route, which starts at Pacific Beach Drive, heads south to Belmont Park and then back north up the bay walk. Baroff, who is a retired health care executive, and Hammett, who is a social worker, are concerned about the homelessness issue and volunteered to help try and make a difference. “I was surprised to see so many homeless when I moved here from Chicago five years ago,” Hammett said. “It’s an issue I want to know more about and learn what can be done to help.” In the first 15 minutes down the boardwalk, the duo identifies two homeless people on the beach and one riding a skateboard. In Mission Beach, a makeshift shelter is spotted near the Green Flash sculpture. But on the walk north the pair does not see any homeless. “I’m surprised we didn’t see more, but maybe that’s a good thing,” Baroff said. “It’s pretty cold so hopefully they have found some shelter.” In the coastal communities there are no permanent homeless shelters, but during the winter churches and other non-profit organizations open temporary shelters. “We don’t have the numbers of homeless that they have downtown,” said McClendon, who has run the WeAllCount in PB for four years. “The homeless know where to find places and makeshift shelters to be able to sleep through the night. But we do the best we can to count them.” At about 5 a.m. volunteers started arriving back at the church to give McClendon their maps and count totals. Over the weekend, the Regional Task Force on the Homeless also conducted interviews with unsheltered homeless to find out more information on their various situations. That data will be compiled into a report and used to help secure federal funding for more services and programs to assist the homeless. According to the Regional Task Force on the Homeless’ 2014 San Diego Regional Homeless Profile Summary, at a single point in time in January 2014, about 8,500 men, women, and children were homeless in the County of San Diego. A little less than half of them (47 percent) slept in a place not meant for human habitation on that night. The report estimated that 85 percent (1,698 out of 2,007) of persons in homeless families were in a SD Regional Homeless Shelter program during last year’s count, while only 37 percent (2,796 out of 6,472) of homeless adult individuals were sheltered on that night. The 2014 report concluded that veterans made up 17 percent of all homeless adults (sheltered and unsheltered); and that approximately 26 percent of San Diego’s homeless adults suffer from some form of severe mental illness, while 19 percent are considered chronic substance abusers. After volunteering for her first homeless count, Hammett said she could empathize with people who have fallen on hard times and have found themselves out in the cold. “It also makes me appreciate how things have gone for me and how thankful I am of everything I have in my life,” she said.
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    Clean-up completes first step toward Roseville pocket park
    by Dave SCHWAB
    Jan 22, 2015 | 5562 views | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend | print
    The Canon Street clean-up will ideally stop erosion during the pocket park's development.
    The Canon Street clean-up will ideally stop erosion during the pocket park's development.
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    Residents of Point Loma's Roseville neighborhood took the first step in a long-term project, cleaning a vacant lot along Canon Street earmarked for conversion into a pocket park. In what some are calling a “pivotal moment,” Burtech Pipeline on Jan. 10 provided approximately $15,000 in heavy equipment and supplies and, with the help of several community volunteers, cleaned up the .28-acre open space parcel at the upper end of Avenida de Portugal where it dead-ends before reaching Canon Street. Removed were cans, bottles and other urban trash as well as dead acacia trees and tumbleweeds that represented a fire hazard. Also cleared were years of accumulated construction debris: steel girders, cinder blocks, blocks of concrete, dumploads of gravel and once-molten asphalt. Thanks to tree pruning, a dangerous blind curve along Canon Street is now much more visible. It is hoped the clean-up will slow or stop site erosion while money is raised and planning done to develop the park. The small undeveloped parcel on Canon Street was transferred from the Public Works Department to Park and Recreation on June 30, 2014, and is now a designated park site. Peninsula Community Planning Group board members Don Sevrens and Jon Linney have been spearheading the community redevelopment project. Sevrens said they approached the city first about doing site clean-up but were told the city “had no money. “So we asked Burtech,” Sevrens said, “and they agreed to do the work on a Saturday with their own people and equipment at their expense with the help of 11 community volunteers, both neighbors and activists.” Sevrens added the work party was well received. “Motorists driving by gave us the thumbs-up,” he said. “Neighbors left their homes and came up and said, ‘We really approve of what you’re doing. We want a park. Can you put us on a contact/work party list?’” In a community memo, the two planners noted the site cleanup accomplished a number of goals. “Now there is something tangible to see, a blank canvas for the features the public wants,” said their statement, noting, “One possibility is a passive walk-in park with trails, water-thrifty plants and signboards celebrating the Portuguese neighborhood’s historic accomplishments.” Pointing out that “the public will decide what goes in the park,” Sevrens and Linney noted other ideas being floated to redevelop the site include winding trails of decomposed granite with benches, a sculpture celebrating the Portuguese community’s achievements, signboards denoting community history and a playground piece styled after the San Salvador being built at Spanish Landing. “This will be a quiet place,” assured both community planners. “No restroom, no concrete, no Keep Off The Grass sign.” There is much more work to do on the project, which is likely to take three to five years to complete. “We will continue doing outreach, talking to individuals, neighbors and small groups,” said Sevrens. “Once a nonprofit sponsor and financial custodian are in place, we will hold two formal workshops to find out what features the public wants. We will approach the county for a possible grant.” But Sevrens conceded that “most of the money, maybe all,” is going to have to come through private donations. “To that end, we will do everything we can to keep the cost down,” Sevrens said. “If we can quickly land major donations, great. Otherwise, we anticipate opening the park in phases so the public will be able to see and enjoy the park sooner.” The planners said a community workshop will likely be scheduled at Portuguese Hall by early summer to receive public input on the pocket park development project.
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    News
    Small crimes raise larger concerns for PB residents
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    Jan 28, 2015 | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Sports
    Lady Pointers suffer first loss of season
    It was understandable when several members of Point Loma High's Lady Pointer basketball team walked off their home court last Friday in tears. They had just lost a 27-24 game to league rival Corona...
    Jan 23, 2015 | 0 0 comments | 7 7 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Arts & Entertainment
    Live ’n’ Local showcase a fun success at Kona Kai
    The Kona Kai Resort may not be hosting many music-related events at the moment, but thanks to promoter Shawn Balch, their Sunday concert series, Live 'n' Local, continues to be one of the city’s be...
    Jan 23, 2015 | 1 1 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend
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    Business
    Iron Pig Alehouse brings authentic smoked barbecue to Pacific Beach
    Iron Pig Alehouse in Pacific Beach is named for its “smoker,” the machine responsible for the authentic, slowed-cooked smoked barbecue, which is its sustenance. “The smoker is the backbone and the ...
    Jan 28, 2015 | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend
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