Take a bite out of the MB centennial event with ‘Jaws’ showing
by DAVE SCHWAB
Jul 09, 2014 | 1157 views | 0 0 comments | 29 29 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Belmont Park, the site of the next installment of the Mission Beach centennial celebration, celebrated its 89th birthday on July 4. The complex is shown in this historic shot relatively early in its existence.           						 Courtesy photo
Belmont Park, the site of the next installment of the Mission Beach centennial celebration, celebrated its 89th birthday on July 4. The complex is shown in this historic shot relatively early in its existence. Courtesy photo
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Mission Beach Centennial Committee (MBCC) will feature the classic thriller “Jaws” as the Dive-in Movie offering on Tuesday, July 15 to continue the community’s yearlong centennial celebration. The showing takes place at the WaveHouse Athletic Park, 3125 Ocean Front Walk in Belmont Park.

The recent Fourth of July weekend also marked the 89th birthday of Belmont Park’s historic Giant Dipper roller coaster, one of only two that still exist in California.

MBCC is encouraging neighbors to grab their families and join the celebration of the community’s century mark by watching the oceanic drama. Doors will open at 8:30 p.m., with the movie starting at 9 p.m.

“Stick your toes in the sand and come watch ‘Jaws’ on the giant screen right in front of the Flow Barrel,” said centennial spokeswoman Wendy Crain.

Popcorn, candy, beverages and specialty cocktails will be available for purchase at the WaveHouse’s concession stand.

One of San Diego’s most notable and popular attractions, the historic Giant Dipper, both a national and state historic landmark, formally celebrated its 89th birthday July 4.

A unique part of the fabric of San Diego’s history, The Giant Dipper, was originally built as a key attraction for the 33-acre Mission Beach Amusement Center, which opened to the public in 1925. The park was developed by sugar magnate John D. Spreckels.

The original cost to build the coaster was $150,000, including its two 18-passenger trains. The Mission Beach Amusement Center was popular through the 1930s and 1940s, and in later years the venue was renamed Belmont Park.

By the late 1960s and early ’70s, Belmont Park fell into disrepair and the park and coaster were closed in December 1976. A group of concerned citizens called “Save The Coaster Committee” successfully got the coaster designated as a national landmark and asked that the ownership be transferred to them. The San Diego Coaster Company was subsequently established and put $2 million into its restoration to ensure the Giant Dipper roller coaster will exist in perpetuity.

On Aug. 11, 1990 the newly restored, historic roller coaster was reopened to the public.

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