Days numbered for Ocean Beach house on Ebers, city issues abatement notice
by DAVE SCHWAB
Published - 11/08/17 - 02:14 PM | 0 0 comments | 9 9 recommendations | email to a friend | print
The unfinished house at the intersection of Ebers and Greene streets has rotting pieces of wood, garbage bags and mattresses in the yard. / Photo from Thomas Melville
The unfinished house at the intersection of Ebers and Greene streets has rotting pieces of wood, garbage bags and mattresses in the yard. / Photo from Thomas Melville
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The letter of abatement from the city on the wall. / Photo by Thomas Melville
The letter of abatement from the city on the wall. / Photo by Thomas Melville
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An abatement notice requiring the dilapidated structure at 2269 Ebers St. in Ocean Beach to be to be cleaned up — or torn down — has been issued by the city.

That's the latest development with the controversial housing project. The notice of abatement declaring the structure to be “a public health and safety threat and a nuisance,” was posted Oct. 23 following an inspection by the city's Code Enforcement Division.

“You shall board and secure every unsecured opening in the structure and clean the site by Nov. 17,” the notice stated. “You are required to permanently remove all litter, rubbish and accumulated debris from the property or premises.”

The abatement notice also concluded the dwelling violates city municipal codes, while adding, “San Diego Police Department reports evidence of transients at this location.”

City senior public information officer Paul Brencik Sr. noted 2269 Ebers St. has a long permitting history with the city's Development Services Department. 

The project's inspections/permitting records show: The project permit was issued March 11, 2016; To date, there have been three passed/approved inspections, an “underground” plumbing and electrical inspection on March 30, 2016, a foundation inspection on April 14, 2016, and a second floor nailing inspection on June 8, 2016.

The owner requested and was granted a permit extension on April 11 with the condition that an inspection was completed no later than June 8. On April 17, a construction change of the approved building plans was submitted to DSD plan review staff. No inspection was scheduled before June 8 and the permit expired a second time; and no additional permit extension request has been submitted.

Architect John Ambert, Ocean Beach Planning Board chair, said the city advisory group has been closely monitoring the situation.

"OBPB is aware of the abatement notice for this property,” said Ambert. “As the property has been vacant for many months now, harboring squatters and illegal activity, the property should qualify as a public nuisance.”

In a letter to the city on behalf of OBPB, Ambert asked, “Can you provide a potential timeline for future actions to be taken by the city to abate, secure, and/or demolish the property, so that we can understand the milestones in this process and maintain accountability? This property needs to be secured as soon as possible, and we want to understand the city's timeline for ensuring this happens in a timely manner.

“This issue has been ongoing for several months now,” continued Ambert. “Given the significant hepatitis issues in our community and the ongoing transient activity specifically at the location, the health and safety issues this property possess are of great concern. We are seeking swift and decisive action from the mayor's office on this matter. Please send us a timeline for action as soon as possible.”

Developer Nelco Properties could not be reached by the Peninsula Beacon for further comment about 2269 Ebers St.

However, in previous remarks, Nelco Properties, said: “With this project we are working to beautify the community and bring increased home values to the surrounding neighborhood. The project conforms to all required municipal codes, city development regulations, and has obtained all required permits … We take our duty as responsible developers seriously ... independent licensed land surveyors have surveyed the property. They have certified that the height of this structure is within the allowable 30-foot height limit. All components of this project have been stamped, approved and signed-off on by the City of San Diego to move forward.”

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